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Found 4 results

  1. Fossil collector rescued after becoming trapped by landslide Fishermen dig injured man out of mud before he is airlifted to safety The Independent, November 2018 https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/fossil-collector-trapped-mud-landslide-cliffs-port-mulgrave-yorkshire-a8605461.html Yours, Paul H.
  2. Fossil hunters tromping through fields, forests, pastures, and grasslands should always be careful of tick bites. The upswing in Tick-Borne Meat Allergy is an important reason to be careful of ticks while fossil hunting. What the Mystery of the Tick-Borne Meat Allergy Could Reveal. Unraveling why tick bites are suddenly causing a strange reaction in some people who eat meat could help scientists better understand how all allergies work. The New York Times https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/24/magazine/what-the-mystery-of-the-tick-borne-meat-allergy-could-reveal.html Red Meat Allergies Caused By Tick Bites Are On The Rise Morning Edition, June 25, 2018 https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2018/06/25/621080751/red-meat-allergies-caused-by-tick-bites-are-on-the-rise A couple of more web pages are: Amblyomma americanum (Lone Star Tick) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amblyomma_americanum NIAID scientists link cases of unexplained anaphylaxis to red meat allergy". National Institutes of Health (NIH). 2017-11-28. https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/niaid-scientists-link-cases-unexplained-anaphylaxis-red-meat-allergy Yours, Paul H.
  3. Although the below article do not specifically mention fossil collecting, the below articles discuss a nasty, hazardous plant, that fossil collectors and anyone either collecting, working or playing in the outdoors of Upstate New York likely need to be aware of and avoid. 'Horror Plant' causes 3rd-degree burns, blindness, is spreading in Upstate NY (photos) By Ben Axelson | baxelson@nyup.com June 26, 2018 https://www.sciencealert.com/invasive-toxic-giant-hogweed-burns-skin-blindness-virginia-clarke-county https://www.newyorkupstate.com/expo/news/erry-2018/06/f2e509cfd11171/horror_plant_causes_3rddegree.html https://nypost.com/2018/06/17/this-plant-causes-3rd-degree-burns-permanent-blindness/ Yours, Paul H.
  4. Hazardous site and behaviour

    Today I had an adventure and I'm very embarrassed. I forgot to bring my common sense. I limped home injured and I really don't want to admit the story! But I will share this, because I really should have known better. I have always been prone to wander. I love nature, exploring, and fresh air. I am disabled so I try to keep my wanderings reasonable for my situation. Over the years I have developed some common sense approaches that work for me: bring lots of water, paper maps, phone batteries, sunscreen, and snacks. I tell neighbors my expected destinations and return times. I wear two GPS tracking devices which continuously transmit my location to family. So what happened today? I don't know. Maybe it's just that my mind is hopping with ideas and I didn't put them into my traditional framework. I did my prepack and communications as usual and headed out. As soon as I got to the water, I started studying it with a new eye toward collecting samples to request identification. I found an item and started toward it. Right away I started making mistakes. I folded up my pant legs to expose my calves so I wouldn't get my pants wet. Wrong! The shells embedded in rock are razor sharp. Then I grabbed a branch to stabilize myself as I went down the bank. Again, wrong! The trees in Florida are made to withstand fierce winds; they are neither sturdy nor stable! I slid down the bank, getting badly cut up, with multiple bruises and knots. The free flowing wounds went into the water, of course, immediately. Ugh! I tried to get back up by stabilizing myself on ... Yeah, slippery rocks. I have mobility problems and getting up was not easy. I kept falling back in. Probably looked and sounded like a dying moose. Anyone who saw me floundering and heard me crying would have thought I was crazy. Today I made every mistake. Amazingly, I didn't hear any shells crunch so that's lucky. I stopped for a moment to ponder my absolute foolishness as a small school of fish curiously approached my wounds. Then a new hazard emerged. This site does not have much to indicate people or animals come here frequently. No footprints. Banks/rocks covered with sheets of undisturbed and fragile lichen (old and new). No gator holes. I gently fished myself out of the river and went onto dry ground to investigate some strange noises I couldn't identify. There, in the woods, I found a human habitation. Not like an ordinary tent camp with regular homeless people. This place had mounds for each tent, carefully covered and concealed. There were concealed traps. There was bedding next to each mound, neatly folded, with no leaves or dirt on it. I believe the only reason I heard noises is that the occupants wanted me to know they were there. Anyway, no fossils today.
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