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Found 106 results

  1. The skull of any dinosaur is composed of many different elements. When I go collecting in an Edmontosaurus bonebed one never finds a skull but the elements that make up one up. Like to use this topic to share the complexity and variety of some of the elements I have collected. I do not have many but will post the ones I have and will continue to add as I prep or find them. Of course if anyone sees any discrepancies please feel to comment and like to thank Olof (LordTrilobite) in the ID of some. Skull still in a jacket not from my usual bonebed but one can see it all together. One day I'll get it mounted. To aid in identification of where SOME these elements are located have this illustration that comes from Marsh's 1893 This is a Saurolophus skull but elements are the same QJ: Quadrotojugal PMX: Premaxilla L: Lacrimal SA: Surangular SQ: Squamosal PO: Postorbital EO: Exoccipital Dentary (Less Teeth ) The Maxilla Surangular Squamosal Quadrotojugal Exoccipital Quadrate \ Splenial
  2. The virus put a damper on my Spring dinosaur collecting trip but I was able to get a partial one in for the Fall. I was able to spend several days at my usual Edmontosaurs bonebed but unfortunately only one day at a channel deposit in Montana where theropod/mammal material can be found. Hopefully next year will be more normal, Hopefully. Quite a few new members since my last trip so I will get into more specifics to get them a view of how I collect this material. First let me share with you a view of the collecting area and the LOCAL wildlife that we deal with on a daily basis. The area in Montana is very remote no phone or internet The badlands where we collect in South Dakota The most beautiful critter that we see everywhere on these sites and all over the west is the Pronghorn. At this time of the year we typically see a small herd with a bull and his harem. For those of you not familiar with a Pronghorn its the fastest animal in the western hemisphere able to achieve speeds in excess of 50 mph (80 km/h) Mule deer are ever present and very dangerous if you are driving when dark The site is located on edge of cliff and over the years lots of holes and cavities have been created by erosion creating a wonderful winter den area for the local snakes. So during our fall trip its not uncommon to have visitors slither by us and of course wishing us good luck by waving their tongue Here are some we have seen this season: The only dangerous one is the Prairie Rattler but they typically are not interested in bothering us. You just have to watch where you are walking. Being from Arizona its normal... The Western Ribbon Snake The Yellow belly Racer The Prairie Bullsnake We do have more cuties' Tiger Salamander after a rainfall On to collecting Other than a pick and shovel these are the tools I use 90% of the time to collect I use two glues, Paleobond field prep and stabilizer. The latter on teeth and when I need a very strong deep bond. Harder to prep with PB002 so its only used when needed. For wrapping the bones Heavy duty aluminum foil does the trick where minimal support is needed . Where additional support is needed on large bones we use burlap and plaster. However plaster cloth like the one in the photo works most of the time and is a heck easier to use than burlap
  3. Richardoestesia or Dakotaraptor?

    Hi everyone, I just got this tooth from the Hell Creek Formation of Carter County, Montana. It was labeled as Richardoestesia, so based on the curvature, I was assuming the proper ID would be cf Richardoestesia gilmorei. However, when taking some measurements, what caught my eye was that the mesial carina appeared to end 1/3 from the base, and I started to wonder if instead this tooth could possibly be Dakotaraptor. These are the measurements I was able to get: Mesial: around 5.5-6 serrations/mm Distal: around 5 serrations/mm CH: around 16.5 mm CBL: around 7 mm CH/CBL: around 2.4 The crown appears to be smooth, the base is almond shape, and I believe the denticles have rounded tips. Please let me know what you all think. Also, some of the measurements may need double checking. Thanks!
  4. Juvenile Nanotyrannus lancensis

    From the album Dinosaurs

    A tooth from a juvenile Nanotyrannus lancensis. Only missing the very tip.
  5. Edmontosaurus annectens

    From the album Dinosaurs

    Hadrosaurs evolved very interesting teeth and complex mastication. Read "Complex Dental Structure and Wear Biomechanics in Hadrosaurid Dinosaurs:" https://science.sciencemag.org/content/338/6103/98
  6. I was very happy to see that recent publication that finally described the youngest known alvarezsurid Trierarchuncus prairiensis from the Hell Creek Formation. Material is rare but is most commonly overlooked and described as Croc or unknown theropod so knowing what to look for helps. I'm constantly on the lookout for this material and have been for years and have been fortunate to either find it or be able to acquire it over time. I used publications of other Alvarezsauridae like the Asian Mononykus and Canadian Albertonykus to help in the identification of my specimens. The paper is pay-walled but I included it for reference purposes. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0195667120302469?via%3Dihub Extremely rare associated material found in SD
  7. Every few years we get rewarded with a new dinosaur described from the Lance/Hell Creek Formations. In this crazy year we finally have one. Finally an Alvarezsauridae has been described from the Hell Creek Formation: Trierarchuncus prairiensis. Sorry its paywalled cannot make comments https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195667120302469 Here is some info on this very different dinosaur, one of my favorites, including some of my material so you can see what the paper is describing. Far better than what you see in the paper
  8. Late Cretaceous mammal fossils from North America

    Could someone help me find PDFs of scientific papers about mammal fossils from the Campanian-Maastrichtian of North America? I'm specifically interested in papers that deal with mammal faunas from the Hell Creek Formation, the Lance Formation and the Dinosaur Park Formation... Thanks for any help Christian
  9. Looking for confirmation on this theropod bone being sold. Seller is identifying it as a theropod (Anzu?) Arctometatarsal from the Hell Creek of Montana, Powder River County.. 10.4" Long. They indicate it cannot definitely provide an ID but the giant raptor Anzu Wylie is a likely candidate be cause other material from this theropod has been found at the quarry. What is a Arctometatarsal?
  10. Hi all, I posted this tooth for ID a while back. Conclusion was that it could be a Dakotaraptor, maybe, maybe. Since then I am going back and forth on the ID, basically on a daily basis So I decided to take more & new images, measure it thoroughly, put it up again, and kindly ask for your help. It was found in the Hell Creek Fm, Powder River Co., Montana. Measurements are: CH: 2.08cm CBL: 0.8cm CBW: 0.42cm Serration count per 5mm is mesial 24 and distal 18. What makes it hard for me to judge: the shape of denticles is between round and chisel (?), the tiny mesial denticles, and the position of the carinae. Lowest part of the mesial carina is sheared off, but I would not expect a twist - looking closely it would end either half way or 1/3 from base. Any help is highly appreciated!
  11. Unidentified Theropod tooth

    Hey everyone i hope you all had a great holiday season....this next tooth in my collection was labled saurornitholestes from the hell creek formation from powder county MT. We know that the only two described raptors from there are dakotaraptor and acheroraptor so im curious to see what you all think of this one. Nanotyrannus perhaps? Unfortunately the anterior serrations have worn off which im sure will make id'ing this tooth difficult but anyway here it is. ....the CH is 9 mm the posterior serrations are 12 per 3 mm. @Troodon
  12. Troodontid or Dromaeosaurid teeth?

    Hey everyone, I came across these teeth online; They're being sold as an Acheroraptor teeth, but seemed odd to me and reminded me of some recurved Pectinodon teeth I had seen elsewhere (given their small size, too). [Tooth 1] The tooth was found in Hell Creek deposits in Carter County, Montana. I edited the seller's images together to make some features more visible. Its total height is 5mm; the serration density I measured is around 6/mm; Scale bar is 4mm. [Tooth 2] The tooth was found in Hell Creek deposits in Powder River County, Montana. Its total height [?] is around 4mm; Since there was no exact scale reference I couldn't edit in a scale bar. Thanks for any help with this!
  13. I urge caution to all collectors buying or trading from dealers, diggers or fellow collectors. Most collectors, diggers or dealers are honest and trustworthy but not all have a firm handle on identification and I'm seeing this situation worsening not improving. Its not easy even for paleontologists who are trained. I include collectors because like myself, have over the years, been sold misidentified material. So dont trust anything you see offered to you and get it verified. Here is just a sampling of a few items I've run across. Provenance is very important in identification ALWAYS request Formation, State or Province and very important County or Town if in the States or City/Area if Alberta. I see lots of genus/species names being assigned to Ceratopsian or Hadrosaurian bones. Other than Edmontosaurus from the Hell Creek or Lance formations its extremely difficult to assign names to any post cranial material from these families. There are just to many named or yet to be named species from Campanian deposits of formations like Aguja of Texas and the Judith River & Two Med Formations of Montana not to mention Canada. Theropod teeth especially Jurassic ones are very hard to distinguish between one another, photos are just not adequate to validate them. Serration counts and dimensions are needed to try to properly assign them. So request it from the seller. Some real life examples: Very nice Metatarsal listed as a Lambeosaurus from the Hell Creek Fm, Jordan, Montana. Species does not even exist in the HC. Its Edmontosaurus This beautiful vertebra is being listed as a caudal of a Carcharodontosaurus sp., a great collector piece. The description states that the ball and socket indicated how far the tail could swing. Unfortunately the seller is looking at the wrong end of the dinosaur. To me it looks like a cervical vertebra of a Spinosaurid. I did advise the seller a few days ago and he did say a change would be made and the listing has been corrected. Here is a photo of a Sigilmassasaurus for you skeptics This type of tooth from the Kem Kem is an indeterminate Abelisaurid not a RAPTOR, not a Dromaeosaur, not a Deltadromeus Very nice femur being listed as Pachycephalosaurus, its Thescelosaurus .. Very nice rooted tooth being listed as Torosaurus, its a Ceratopsian tooth. There is no way to distinguish Torosaurus teeth from all the other large bodied ceratopsian in the Hell Creek Fm other that if it was found with an identifiable skull. This claw was sold as Troodon from the Judith River, to me it looks like Caenagnathidae This is being listed as a first phalange Toe bone of a tyrannosaur Daspletosaurus. Its a metatarsal of an indeterminate Tyrannosaurid either Daspletosaurus or Gorgosaurus. Unless it was found with some Daspleto diagnostic material, difficult to tell them apart. Seller was advised a long time ago, no changes made. A Daspletosaurus tooth is listed from the Judith River Fm...beautiful tooth but one cannot distinguish teeth between teeth of Tyrannosaurids and Daspletosaurus sp. although assumed to be present its yet to be described from JR deposits
  14. Hey everyone! In this post im going to be sharing two teeth from my collection. The first one was sold to me as acheroraptor. Its from the Hell Creek formation in MT and its CH is 7 mm. @Troodon
  15. My sons and I have been searching different formations in MD/VA for many years so we know how to recognize the different formation layers and have a good idea where to find/or at least check for micro sites/micro lenses. My sons have also been collecting the Eocene/Oligocene formations of Nebraska for years so again they know how to recognize the formation layers. My younger son Mel moved to South Dakota in 2018 and began to also collect the Lance Formation and Hell Creek Formation. However he is still learning the different formation layers. His interest is dinosaur fossils from these formations. My interests are the much smaller micro dinosaur fossils as well as the micro mammal, squamate, amphibian, and fish fossils. I’m always bugging him to send me micro matrix. He sent me matrix this Fall. This post is about one batch of matrix. Mel’s first approach was to send matrix from small areas that have high density surface concentrations of teeth and bones. Where Mel is collecting is more flat and rolling with different Hell Creek layers exposed on the surface versus bluffs and small cliff faces. Mel for Thanksgiving sent me a large USPS priority box of matrix (around three gallons) from a small 6 ft. by 6 ft. area that had a high concentration of dino teeth on the surface. Although sand/clay based this matrix was hard as concrete. I had to use a rock hammer and a small hand sledge hammer to break what he sent into more manageable pieces (definitely not recommended if you are looking for larger specimens). That said the matrix broke down completely in a single day in buckets of very hot tap water and dawn dish soap. I would every few hours use finger pressure to help break up clumps. There was very little residue left after breakdown of this matrix. The below picture shows the residue from about 1/3 of the matrix or around a gallon. The below picture shows what I found. On the left maybe some petrified wood? Doesn’t really look like bone. Maybe geologic. In the middle there is a really nice Croc tooth (4mm), seed (5mm) (maybe modern?), and a partial gar fish scale (7mm). On the right there are several definite small bones and a few specimens that could be bones. Looks like a terrestrial/fluvial environment. What I found was nice but not worth the effort to remove the matrix, send it to Virginia, break the matrix down, and then to search it. Although like I said earlier, there was very little residue after breakdown, so it took only about 15 minutes to search all of the residue. Sampling different sites/layers and trial and error can be extremely tedious and non-productive if you really don’t understand the formation layers and how to recognize them in the field. So I reached out to a TFF member for advice and insight. He explained the matrix types and gave advice on where to take matrix samples. Taking matrix from areas with high density surface concentrations of larger fossils is one way to sample for micros like Mel did for this matrix. However TFF member cautioned that lots of times these concentrations of larger fossils got washed from another layer to the current area years ago and that the underlying layer may not contain much at all as seemed to be the case with this area/layer for this matrix. When you find a good micro site/layer it is very rewarding in the micros that you can find but these sites/micro layers can be difficult to find especially if you don’t have a lot of experience with the Formation. If anyone reading this post has any advice or insight for looking for a Hell Creek Formation specific micro site/layer please post it in a reply. Marco Sr.
  16. Work on Hell Creek Display Begins

    It has taken 10 and a half months but I can finally start putting together our large display of the Hell Creek Fauna. I am really quite excited to start putting it together. We have a pretty good cross section of critters and I think it will be an excellent display to show the diversity of the formation. I also think this will be a great display to use as we explain how different animals share an ecosystem which is a science standard we want to get into more with the 2nd and 3rd grade students. I delayed starting this until we had tracked won three key fossils we were missing, Leptoceratops, Pachycephalosaurus, and Denversaurus. Those three have all gotten crossed off the list in the last month or so with the final domino being Denversaurus. We are still missing a Pectinodon tooth but we can add that down the road. I think now is the time to put it together so we can use this display for our presentation in Paradise which comes shortly after the year anniversary of the Camp Fire which burned the city down. It is a special program at the newly rebuild elementary school I will add some pictures of all the fossils in their individual displays later and once it is all living in one display. I am really proud of this one and I want to give a huge thanks to @Troodon who helped us immensely with this formation. Here is the Denversaurus tooth that I just picked up. A pretty nice tooth and a decent price at that. Today has been a good day for us as this is the one we needed to finish this up right !
  17. This was on several twitter paleo pages, posted this morning by several paleontologists. Comments and photos are that of the of North Dakota Geological Survey's Paleontology protection program. 2014 article https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2014/oct/21/dakota-ducbkilled-dinosaur-home-bismarck This was the old "Dakota" exhibit. It was meant to be temporary. The arm is the piece on the bottom edge. It was previously displayed with the palm up, and this side was not well prepared and wasn't exposed before. This is indeed a portion of "Dakota" the Dinomummy, which is part of the North Dakota State Fossil Collection. We are currently working on cleaning this specimen for a new exhibit to open Feb 2020 People were confused at exactly what they were looking at here, so we've thrown together a little guide to explain how the bones of the hand relate to the fossilized soft tissue. Yes, digit III has a large 'hoof-like' nail, and much of the hand is encased in 'mitten' of skin. What this means is that the fingers could not really move independently that much, but acted more as a single unit. The tiny pink finger (digit V) is reduced and had no nail. Note: these images are "in progress" images. More work has been completed since they were taken Tail skin
  18. I try to get out dinosaur collecting twice a year and this year has been very good to me. Here are some quick field shots of SOME of my finds for this fall. I have a big prep job in front of we but I also use someone in Hill City to do some of my complicated work. Sites are in Montana and South Dakota all from the Hell Creek Formation. My Spring trip post have more specifics on the localities. My best find of the trip occurred on day 3 in Montana a complete dentary (lower jaw) with teeth of a Ceratopsian most likely Triceratops sp. The field photo show the jaw with lots of matrix around it to protect the sheath and teeth.. The jaw layed perfectly for me with teeth side up and flat so it made collecting easy. Here is an initial look at the jaw. The bone area in the middle is actually a sheath that is covering battery of teeth. Not all the teeth are covered by the sheath those in the far right are exposed and you can see the center ridge poking out, red circles. Prepping will expose them. Length 25" (65 cm) sorry did not brush it clean before the photo In addition to the one above I found two Hadrosaur jaws in SD from an Edmontosaurus. Both jaws are laying vertically, teeth side in against the wall. Typically they do not have teeth but until the prep is complete hard to say. One was from a Juvie about 20" (19 cm) and the other from a very young animal +13" (33 cm) which is pretty rare for this site. My initial view of the larger one was to expose the ascending ramus ( hinge) Here is the small jaw - preservation of the hinge area was not good but needed to collect it because of size. No teeth present.
  19. Hell Creek Metatarsal Joint Fragment

    Hey everyone, I recently came across this fossil online. It was listed as a metatarsal joint fragment, which to me checks out, but the person further identified it as a Dromaeosaurid [though they didn't specify based on what characters] and tentatively assigned it to Dakotaraptor based on size. Now I was wondering: Can remains this fragmental even be reliably distinguished from the other small- to medium-sized theropods in Hell Creek? The fossil was found in Hell Creek deposits in Wyoming [no info on the exact location], measures 30.9 x 27.5mm [not specified along which sides], and weighs 252 grams. Thank you for any input on this!
  20. Rex Toe Bone?

    Hey everyone, I recently purchased this toe bone and the seller identified it as an Edmontosaurus, but now I’m thinking it might be a bit to big to be Edmontosaurus. I was thinking it might be from a bigger animal, like Tyrannosaurus Rex. The bone is about 4 inches long and 2 inches wide. It was found in the Hell Creek Formation in Montana. Any help is appreciated! Thanks!
  21. Hell Creek Avian Tooth

    This is a pretty interesting tooth and I figured I would post it here to get some additional thoughts. This is labeled as an Avisaurus tooth from Garfield County Montana, Hell Creek formation. The first thing that stood out to me was that the shape was a bit different than most teeth labeled Avisaurus that I have seen. Granted I have not seen many but this looked different. It is also close to 1/4" which seems quite large for an Avisaurus. Since there are several Enantionithean birds from Hell Creek, it could be from one for sure but could it be something else? I did some research and found photos on line of a jaw fragments from an Ichthyornis from Kansas that had a similar looking tooth. I am talking general shape really, not saying that is what this is. I also found a comparative study of Hesperornis and Ichthyornis teeth on line and it has a similar shape to one of the Hesperornis teeth in that study. I am very unfamiliar with Avian teeth so I am strictly going by what little research I could find on line. I know there are a couple of Hesperorniformes and an unnamed Ichthyornithean from Hell Creek so it is possible that this tooth belongs to a bird that is not an Enantionithean but I thought this is an ideal tooth to put on the forum and seek some help from those with far more knowledge. Any comments, insights, or thoughts ?
  22. Need Help IDing Hell Creek Dino Bone

    I have a fossil found in the Hell Creek Formation in South Dakota. Through studying I have not found a bone that matches mine in any known Hell Creek dinosaur. The bone is 8 1/4 inches tall, 5 inches long, and a width of 1 3/4 inches. The fossil weighs 2 lbs and 14.2 ounces. My belief is that it is from an ornithischian, possibly a ceratopsian or an ornithopod. It has a large hole in it for bone marrow, and at first glance looks like a human hip bone. Please help ID my fossil! Thanks!!!! -Carnoraptor
  23. Just got back from a trip to the badlands of Montana and South Dakota in the Hell Creek Formation.. Here are some photos of some of the bones I picked up at an Edmontosaurus site. My hope was to collect specimens fitting in a shoebox and I was fairly successful at that which was quite surprise since you dont get to choose what you find. The site is faily large and the area I was collected had about 6 foot of overburden removed a couple of years ago so there was only 12 inches left before I hit the layer. The layer in this area is about 17 to 20 inches thick, white lines. Nothing is prepped at this point, lots of work in front of me but here are the raw photos before beautification Foot Bones - numbers correspond to my finds #1 Juvenile Metatarsal - IV #2 Phalanx II-2 Ventral view #3 Phalanx IV not yet sure which one #3 Another Phalanx IV bone #4 Ungual Digit III... found two close match to each other #4 Ungual Juvie think its Digit IV but I need to verify after prepping
  24. Hell creek small theropod bone?

    I was recently going through some old finds from last summer when I came across this little bone, it is partially hollow and has very porous bone structure. that's why I assume this bone came from a very small theropod. It shares some resemblance to a bambiraptor coracoid as shown in the last picture and is almost exactly the same size. the bone measures 11mm wide in the first picture
  25. Help with interpreting fossils

    Hi, Brand new to the site. Any help would be appreciated. I am a 6th grade Science teacher in suburban St. Louis. About 8 years ago I attended a dig with the St. Louis Science center to the Hell Creek formation outside of Jordan, Montana. I brought several fossils home to use in my classroom. I would love to get more information about them. My students absolutely love hearing about them and the more details the better! The first set of images was identified as being part of Triceratops frill. I can see the blood grooves in the bone. There also appears to be fossilized blood vessels on the surface of the bone. One starts at one side of the frill, travels through the frill and comes out the other side. Can blood vessels fossilize? Am I interpreting that correctly? Also on the "back" side of the fossil there appears to be a lot of dark almost granular material. At first I thought it was something organic (lichens) from the site where I found it. It is definitely fossilized and not something I can scrape off. Any ideas what that is? The second fossil is still unidentified. I was not able to get information about it on our trip from the paleontologist. Any information would be awesome! Thank you!
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