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Found 74 results

  1. My son and I recently started an education non-profit using fossils. Since the little kids love dinosaurs, we decided to include them in our programs. I do not know much about Dinosaur fossils but I am trying learning on the fly. There is no way we can pick up a full tooth or large bone from a T-Rex. our purchasing power is limited. I did find a dealer that has several partial teeth or tooth shards listed as T-Rex. They are affordable for us and did come from Hell Creek. I am apprehensive about buying any of them though because I do not want to drop any money on something called a T-Rex unless I can be fairly certain that is what it is. I do not possess enough knowledge to ID a partial tooth nor do I know if you even can correctly identify a tooth shard. I will put to this those here with far more knowledge than I have.... Can you ID a tooth shard as T-Rex and if that is possible, what would you look for ? Thank you in advance for any help that I can get
  2. I've gotten a tooth and need help to identify it. He should comes from Wyoming (Hell Creek Formation) and is about 4,3cm (1.7 inches) tall. A geologist said, he might have come from a Carcharodontosaurus, but he does not come from North America. This is also the brown-black color. Carcharodontosaurus is native to Africa and would rather have sand color. However, I'm not a paleontologist^^. The Nanotyrannosaurus could it also be, if the origin is right. Of course, I also hope that it is not a fake, because on the inside, is a purple spot to see and I've never seen that in a fossil. By weight, it comes in any case to an original. It would be great if you could help me. (By the way, the Seller said it is a animal in family of the Tyrannosauridae)
  3. Hey guys, I´m from Germany and have bought this little tooth from the Hell Creek Formation in Montana. The seller described the tooth as "Dromaeosaur tooth", which belongs possible to Dakotaraptor or Acherorator. I´m not sure about the identification of this tooth and hope, that you can help me. The tooth is 1,27cm (= 1/2") in lenght. Thank you in advance and kind regards!
  4. Hey guys, Hello I am from Germany. That's why I apologize for my bad English. This tooth (top right in the picture) I have recently screaked from the US. The tooth comes from the Hell Creek Formation (Wyoming). It was sold as a "Raptor" tooth. He is about 7mm (0,28") long. I´m not sure, to which dinosaur the tooth belongs, thats why I asked my question in this forum. I hope, that you can help me! Thank you in advance and kind regards!
  5. In the current (July-August 2018) issue of American Scientist magazine there's an article on champsosaurs. Anyone who's collected Late Cretaceous fossils in Montana, the Dakotas, Wyoming, or southern Canada has probably found a few. You tend to get just a paragraph or two about the group in mainstream science articles about animals that survived the K/T extinctions but there's a whole article about them. Check out your local Barnes & Noble if you don't have online access.
  6. The seller put these teeth up for sale and identifies them as unidentified Dromaeosaurus teeth with possibly one being Acheroraptor. Looking for consensus on the identification, thank you for looking
  7. Hello Fossil Forum! I recently purchased a metasequoia cone that is from the Huff, North Dakota area and the place I purchased it from has a tag claiming that it is 85 million years old. I believed it at first, but after some research I am unsure of its age. I have a Mesozoic collection going, so I’d like to know if it is late Cretaceous in age. Thank you!
  8. This weeks round of red flags Recent listings offers a number of very long Spinosaur teeth at very low prices. Most of these have fake roots and more. Avoid and post here before you buy. A member just got taken last week so please be careful. Large rooted teeth are expensive. A finger bone is offered described from a Spinosaurus. I think its a carpal but we have no scientific evidence that this morphology is from a Spinosaur. Its a very nice indeterminate Theropod carpal. This bone is listed coming from a Carcharodontosaurus. We have no idea who is the owner of this bone, no associated foot material has been published for any large Kem Kem Theropod. Best identified as indeterminate Theropod. Lots of fake Dinosaur eggs continue to be listed. Please post interest before you buy. A pair of Aublysodon Premaxillary teeth offered for sale. Reminder this is no longer considered a valid species, they are best identified as Tyrannosaurid indet. Most likely Nanotyrannus.
  9. Triceratops claw?

    Hi, Is this a claw from a Triceratops? it is from the Hell Creek Formation and is slightly over 2 inches in length.
  10. Saw these listed yesterday and the tooth was identified as a T-rex 1.55" long and Vertebra being from a Hadrosaur. Like to have confirmation on those ID's thanks
  11. Theropod skeletons from the Hell Creek Formation are very rare and avian ones are exceeding rare. Here the Black Hills Institute is putting together a replica of a partial Ornithomimosaur skeleton that was found with a complete undistorted skull. The skull and skeleton of this ornithomimosaur probably represent a new taxon according to the BHI. They state: that because this is the first skull from any member of the family Ornithomimosauridae from the Hell Creek Formation, it is impossible to compare it with other specimens. Clearly, however, the skeleton shows some features in the hand and pelvis that separate it from the described Struthiomimus sedens. Like my other BHI topics the photos and comments are from BHI President Pete Larsen. This replica is going to China. Started mounting an undescribed ornithomimosaur today for a Chinese museum. Using our copy in the background to speed up the process. Making progress on the cast of the undescribed ornithomimosaur from the Montana Hell Creek today. This is a very nice skeleton, despite the missing caudals and most of the dorsals More progress on the ornithomimid today. Finished mounting the other pelvic bones, dorsal and cervical vertebrae. Got a little bit done on the ornithomimosaur today. Finished mounting the chevrons and started on mounting the ribs. Mounted a bunch of bones on the ornithomimosaur today. One must be careful when you give a dinosaur a ribbing, because quite often they can be armed. Without complete feet it’s difficult for a dinosaur to move. I guess this ornithomimosaur will have to be toed We finished the ornithomimosaur mount today. Now we have to tear it down and make shipping brackets, readying it for the long painting process. This Hell Creek fossil is one of the great skeletons from the end of the age of dinosaurs. This is despite the fact that it is missing one leg and arm as well as its tail and most of the dorsal vertebrae Probably the most important part preserved is a complete and, for the most part, undistorted skull! One is not finished with mounting a dinosaur until shipping brackets are constructed to imobalize the parts inside a crate, and to be used should the skeleton be put into storage. We finished the mounting of the ornithomimosaur today
  12. David Evans and crew from the ROM have been collecting in the Hell Creek of Montana instead of their usual Judith River localities. They have not reported finding much but today's Twitter feed David posted these pictures and commented "We found dinosaur eggshell today! It’s a rarity for the Hell Creek Formation. Thanks to Wendy Sloboda for her expert help finding it.". Have never been lucky enough to find any and like David indicated they are pretty rare in the HC. @-Andy- @HamptonsDoc @CBchiefski hazard a guess what type they are?
  13. I saw these teeth for sale and the Id's look squirrely but I'm not an expert so look for a positive ID. All from Hell Creek Formation The seller identifies this as a Troodon tooth 1/4" looks more like a Pectinodon The others are being sold as Dromaeosaurus/Raptor All are 1/2" or less. They look like juvie Nanotyrannus
  14. Consolidated all my informational Topics to make it easier to reference. Will keep updating since some of the reference material is outdated. Have to thank @PFOOLEY for suggesting this consolidation and it makes it a lot easier for me to access these topics as well as our members to know what's out there. General Tips in Buying Theropod Teeth Dinosaur Anatomy 101 Stratigraphy of the Late Cretaceous in North America Best Books for Dinosaur Identification Triassic Identification of Dinosaur Teeth from the Triassic of New Mexico Jurassic: Morisson Formation Identification of Theropod Teeth Tips in Buying a Sauropod Foot Claw Ornithischians from the Morisson Formation Jurassic: Europe Dinosaurs of Costal Portugal Jurassic Theropods of Germany Cretaceous: North America Identification of Theropod Teeth in the Hell Creek and Lance Formations Identification of Troodontid Teeth Identification of Tyrannosaurid Teeth From North America Identification of Ankylosaurid Teeth Identification of Acheroraptor Teeth North American Tyrannosaurids what is Described Identification of Claws and Ungals from the Hell Creek and Lance Formations Identification of Pachycephalosaurid and Thescelosaurus Teeth Tooth Features in Tyrannosaurids Dakotaraptor Teeth and Claws Hell Creek Fm Identification of Bones /Claws from Alvarezsaurids from North America Hell Creek Faunal Representation Identification of Theropod Teeth from Judith River and Two Medicine Formations . Theropod Assemblage of New Jersey Cretaceous: Kem Kem of Morocco Kem Kem Theropod Teeth Kem Kem Theropod Tooth Morphology Identification of Sauropod Teeth from the Kem Kem Tips in Purchasing a Spinosaurid Hand Claw Identification of Claws from the Kem Kem Identification of Spinosaurid Jaws from the Kem Kem Republic of Niger Identification of Theropod Teeth Cretaceous: South America Patagonia's Theropod Teeth Cretaceous: Uzbekistan: Identification of Theropod Teeth: Uzbekistan Sauropod Teeth: Uzbekistan Cretaceous: Europe Identifying Baryonyx Teeth
  15. I see a tooth being sold as Aublysodon and the seller also states it could be another juvenile tyrannosaurid My understanding is that this is not a valid species correct. Tooth is around 1/2 "
  16. I saw this beautiful toe bone for sale and wondered if it's identified correctly, seller calls it a Struthiomimus. From the Hell Creek Formation of Montana, 2 3/4" long
  17. An very rare Ornithomimus foot claw and digit is being offered for sale from the Hell Creek Formation of Montana. It's a beautiful claw unfortunately it belongs to a Thescelosaurus. The digit probably also belongs to a Thescelosaurus but it's a from a phalanx position 1 and therefore not next to the claw like shown in the photo. What you are spending your money here is for the claw not the digit. It's not very rare claw but nicely preserved and a great addition to any collection.
  18. I noticed a Dakotaraptor tooth for sale and caution anyone interested in it to do a bit more homework before you buy. Dakotaraptor teeth are difficult to diagnose and can easily be confused with Nanotyrannus teeth. These teeth have been very difficult to find and are prized but be patient and be sure its the real deal. If interested my suggestion is to obtain more information on the tooth: A photo of the mesial carina. On the holotype the mesial carina typically ends 1/3 from the base A closeup pictures of the mesial and distal denticles, see below on what they should look like. Not box shape like Nano. From the photos provided it might look right but need that closeup A serration count midline of both edges 5mm wide. Being a Dromaeosaurid the serrations are larger on the distal carina than mesial one. . Denticle shape from DePalma paper included in my topic shown below
  19. Spring 2018 Dino Trip

    Anytime you can go collecting fossils its a good time and I would like to share my spring trip to South Dakota and Montana. My South Dakota site is in the upper Hell Creek Formation and full of the hadrosaur Edmontosaurus annectens. I've been collecting this site for over 20 years and its still delivering. We are on the edge of a bluff and the fossil layer can be between 2 to 4 feet. Lots of good bones are to be found but we also have lots of punky or junk bones and about 70 % is collectible. The site is quite large and like I said last year we have no idea of its size but it contains scores of hadrosaurs, all disarticulated. No skulls are found but all the elements that make up a skull can be found. I like collecting in the section where smaller bones, unguals-toe-carpal-verts, are more typical while others like to go after larger limb bones. My trip to these areas takes me through the Chile Capital of the World, Hatch, New Mexico. Greeting me is Mr Rex a good start to my trip. I hear he is harmless... all show no action Some pictures of the South Dakota site The collecting zone is between the white lines a layer of 2 to 4 feet. The layer is shown below. The top is very crumbly and full of concretions. My Collecting gear consists of a tool box with everything I need to collect My glue field consolidant, orange bottle, without strength but is easy to prep and my structural glue, red. Activator to accelerate curing which rarely used. Tips for the glue Basic Tools I like to use No its not a beach day but temperatures approaching 90 degrees (32C) can get pretty hot so some protection is needed
  20. Newest Rex Tooth

    Good morning all, it has been a bit since I've posted here. I recently picked up a nice Tyrannosaurus rex tooth from the Hell Creek formation. This tooth has a lot of character to it. Even though it is not huge by any means, it has beautiful enamel and excellent serrations. I just wanted to get everyone's thoughts on it. Thank you!
  21. I post this as a reminder to Dinosaur tooth collectors that the Kem Kem Beds is not the only place that you need to be careful when you are looking to buy teeth but offerings from the States can be problematic. New collectors should to be especially mindful that sellers are not always accurate in what they are selling. Best to ask us B4 you buy. Here are a few examples: A beautiful Tyrannosaur tooth is being offered and sold as Albertosaurus from the Judith River Formation of Montana. Unfortunately this species is not described from this locality and currently only known from very late campanian, early maastrichtian deposits of the Horseshoe Canyon Formation in Alberta. You cannot distinguish between species of Tyrannosaurid teeth from campanian deposits. So this tooth is either a Daspletosaurus or Gorgosaurus tooth. Best identified as Tyrannosaurid indet. Aublysodon pre-max tooth is being offered from the Judith River of Montana. Unfortunately this species is no longer considered valid and teeth of this morphology are assigned to other Tyrannosaurids. In this formation, it's either a Daspletosaurus or Gorgosaurus tooth. Nice tooth best identified as Tyrannosaurid indet. An offering of a Nodosaurs tooth, Edmontonia rugosidens from the Hell Creek Formation. Unfortunately this species is not described from the Hell Creek Formation. Currently only Denversaurus schlessmani is the only described Nodosaur from the Hell Creek/ Lance Formations. Again a nice tooth. Be aware that other Nodosaurs may exist in these localities and this tooth is best described as Nodosaurid indet. but until those discoveries are made calling it Denversaurus is acceptable. The Ceratopsian Leptoceratops gracilis is being offered from the Hell Creek Formation. Again this species has not been described from this formation. The teeth are however identical to those L. gracilis and should be identified as: c.f. Leptoceratops gracilis. until we have a named species described. Daspletosaurus tooth being offered from the Judith River Formation. Similar comment as my first one. You cannot distinguish between species of Tyrannosaurid teeth from campanian deposits. Either a Daspletosaurus or Gorgosaurus tooth. Best identified as Tyrannosaurid indet.
  22. Not sure how many have see this Devian Art Representation of the Dinosaur fauna in the Hell Creek & Lance Formations. It's Paleop interpretation of what he believes exists. Download the image in the link to see it best. Not everything he shows has been officially described but the number and type look pretty good. It's pretty cool The image is the link
  23. A very brief article about the "Chicken from Hell" Anzu wyliei found in the Hell Creek Formation. Added some of my photos to get a better view of this cool Dinosaur. Carnegie Museum Article http://carnegiemuseumnaturalhistory.tumblr.com/post/165688152585/anzu-wyliei-perhaps-better-known-by-its-colorful/amp?__twitter_impression=true 5 feet high at the hips. Hand Claws reached 7 inches long
  24. Documented in this paper is baby hadrosaur that represents the first occurrence of an articulated nestling dinosaur skeleton from the latest Cretaceous (late Maastrichtian) of North America. It's from the Hell Creek of Montana, Garfield County. Edmontosaurus annectens Red... Scapula Purple.. Vert column Green..Pubis Blue.. Femur & Tibia Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. ....Paywalled for non members.. A nestling-sized skeleton of Edmontosaurus(Ornithischia, Hadrosauridae) from the Hell Creek Formation of northeastern Montana, U.S.A., with an analysis of ontogenetic limb allometry Mateusz Wosik,Mark B. Goodwin &David C. Evans http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02724634.2017.1398168?journalCode=ujvp20#.Wog2CXWObFg.twitter
  25. Troodontids certainly are one of my favorite dinosaur families. Intelligent and what a set of chompers to eat you with, all you can ask for in a cool dinosaur. Will start this with the Pectinodon teeth in my collection and will continue to add as I take photos. This species has some of the coolest teeth. Pectinodon bakkeri is the only named Troodontid in the Hell Creek and Lance Formations. This is a tooth taxon and its teeth are significantly much smaller than its big cousin Stenonychosaurus. Lance Formation Hell Creek Formation A couple of the teeth in matrix are partially rooted which is extremely rare since the teeth are so small Hell Creek Formation - Powder River County Hell Creek Formation
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