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Found 85 results

  1. Hell Creek Avian Tooth

    This is a pretty interesting tooth and I figured I would post it here to get some additional thoughts. This is labeled as an Avisaurus tooth from Garfield County Montana, Hell Creek formation. The first thing that stood out to me was that the shape was a bit different than most teeth labeled Avisaurus that I have seen. Granted I have not seen many but this looked different. It is also close to 1/4" which seems quite large for an Avisaurus. Since there are several Enantionithean birds from Hell Creek, it could be from one for sure but could it be something else? I did some research and found photos on line of a jaw fragments from an Ichthyornis from Kansas that had a similar looking tooth. I am talking general shape really, not saying that is what this is. I also found a comparative study of Hesperornis and Ichthyornis teeth on line and it has a similar shape to one of the Hesperornis teeth in that study. I am very unfamiliar with Avian teeth so I am strictly going by what little research I could find on line. I know there are a couple of Hesperorniformes and an unnamed Ichthyornithean from Hell Creek so it is possible that this tooth belongs to a bird that is not an Enantionithean but I thought this is an ideal tooth to put on the forum and seek some help from those with far more knowledge. Any comments, insights, or thoughts ?
  2. Need Help IDing Hell Creek Dino Bone

    I have a fossil found in the Hell Creek Formation in South Dakota. Through studying I have not found a bone that matches mine in any known Hell Creek dinosaur. The bone is 8 1/4 inches tall, 5 inches long, and a width of 1 3/4 inches. The fossil weighs 2 lbs and 14.2 ounces. My belief is that it is from an ornithischian, possibly a ceratopsian or an ornithopod. It has a large hole in it for bone marrow, and at first glance looks like a human hip bone. Please help ID my fossil! Thanks!!!! -Carnoraptor
  3. Just got back from a trip to the badlands of Montana and South Dakota in the Hell Creek Formation.. Here are some photos of some of the bones I picked up at an Edmontosaurus site. My hope was to collect specimens fitting in a shoebox and I was fairly successful at that which was quite surprise since you dont get to choose what you find. The site is faily large and the area I was collected had about 6 foot of overburden removed a couple of years ago so there was only 12 inches left before I hit the layer. The layer in this area is about 17 to 20 inches thick, white lines. Nothing is prepped at this point, lots of work in front of me but here are the raw photos before beautification Foot Bones - numbers correspond to my finds #1 Juvenile Metatarsal - IV #2 Phalanx II-2 Ventral view #3 Phalanx IV not yet sure which one #3 Another Phalanx IV bone #4 Ungual Digit III... found two close match to each other #4 Ungual Juvie think its Digit IV but I need to verify after prepping
  4. Hell creek small theropod bone?

    I was recently going through some old finds from last summer when I came across this little bone, it is partially hollow and has very porous bone structure. that's why I assume this bone came from a very small theropod. It shares some resemblance to a bambiraptor coracoid as shown in the last picture and is almost exactly the same size. the bone measures 11mm wide in the first picture
  5. Help with interpreting fossils

    Hi, Brand new to the site. Any help would be appreciated. I am a 6th grade Science teacher in suburban St. Louis. About 8 years ago I attended a dig with the St. Louis Science center to the Hell Creek formation outside of Jordan, Montana. I brought several fossils home to use in my classroom. I would love to get more information about them. My students absolutely love hearing about them and the more details the better! The first set of images was identified as being part of Triceratops frill. I can see the blood grooves in the bone. There also appears to be fossilized blood vessels on the surface of the bone. One starts at one side of the frill, travels through the frill and comes out the other side. Can blood vessels fossilize? Am I interpreting that correctly? Also on the "back" side of the fossil there appears to be a lot of dark almost granular material. At first I thought it was something organic (lichens) from the site where I found it. It is definitely fossilized and not something I can scrape off. Any ideas what that is? The second fossil is still unidentified. I was not able to get information about it on our trip from the paleontologist. Any information would be awesome! Thank you!
  6. Very cool article on a Hell Creek Fm bonebed in Bowman, North Dakota A meteor impact 66 million years ago generated a tsunami-like wave in an inland sea that killed and buried fish, mammals, insects and a dinosaur, the first victims of Earth’s last mass extinction event. The death scene from within an hour of the impact has been excavated at an unprecedented fossil site in North Dakota. (Graphics and photos courtesy of Robert DePalma) https://news.berkeley.edu/2019/03/29/66-million-year-old-deathbed-linked-to-dinosaur-killing-meteor/
  7. I've taken a pretty firm position on the validity of Nanotyrannus ever since I spent some time looking at the Dueling Dinosaurs shortly after they were discovered. Subsequent to that, new information that I've become aware of just cemented my position. I'm interested in understanding the "truth" and have no problem looking at all available specimens that are in private hands or museums. The optics are very clear to me and I have difficulty understanding the debate. Collectors need to form their own opinion on this but I would like to share with you why I believe its a valid species. I present here several examples supporting my case, many others exist but will leave it at this. You always hear we need see sub-adult/baby specimens of Trex so a comparison can be make against Nanotyrannus claimed specimens. Shocking but some specimens do exist in institutions and private hands. Included in this discussion are a couple of examples of these specimens other are out there some in private hands and hopefully will be published. Case in point here is a jaw of a Baby T rex in private hands. Its only 35 cm wide. Paleontologists involved in this debate are very well aware of its existence. This cast is in my collection Top jaw: T rex (BHI6439), White jaw: Nanotyrannus (BMPR2002.4.2) Note that the length of the tooth row is nearly identical, Top jaw contains 12 circular alveloi typical of adult T rex's while the white jaw contains 17 rectangular alveloi typical of what is described as Nanotyrannus. Morphology of the teeth is classic for Trex: fat, oval and robust. Morphology of white jaws teeth is classic for Nanotyrannus: rectangular, lean and more gracile. There are a number of other morphological differences that Pete Larsen has identified with the jaws but the eye test should be enough for this discussion Compare the widths for both of these species, there is no comparison its pretty obvious how robust one is over the other. If the Jaws were not enough here are the arms and claws. Here is a sub-adult Trex arm (UCRC-PV1) housed at the University of Chicago (Paul Sereno). Paleontologists involved in this debate are very well aware of its existence. This is the only complete Trex arm and hand that has been found to date and articulated including the scapula and coracoid and partial skeleton including vertebrae. The bones including the claws compare well with those of known adult T rex and the vertebrae are about twice the size of Jane (Nanotyrannus) Every known bone from the hand of a Nanotyrannus is larger than and morphologically different from every known hand bone of adult or sub-adult T rex. I'm not aware of any other Tyrannosaurid where juvie and adult arms become smaller as the animal ages. Here is an sketch comparing the two to see how different the bones are. Pete Larsen also points out that "Animals do not change the orientation of semicircular canals, imbedded within solid bone, as they grow" Compare the long bone of Nanotyrannus with arrow to the one below on T rex Sue Sue - Carpal is much shorter and with a different morohology... Here is a comparison of a carpal digit I Wyrex (Top), Nanotyrannus (Middle), Sue (Bottom) Both Trex's have a larger bulge at the end of the bone. Very different morphology. You can argue ontogenetic changes but the robustness is present in the arm from above. Lets move on to the claws - Top T rex Digit I - Sue (Left), Digit II - Darwin (Right) (Darwin an adult Trex which was the commercial name its been recently sold to a Museum) Bottom Nanotyrannus - Digit I (Left), Digit II (Right) (BMRP 2006.4.4) Morphology is very different and Digt II of Darwin is very similar to that of the sub adult claw see below. Sub Adult Trex claw Digit II, 5 cm .. compares quite well to adult Darwin not Nanotyrannus Lots of the photos provided by Peter Larsen One last item to present is the Witmer Labs study on Tyrannosaurid braincases...it clearly demonstrates that there is a difference between T-rex and Nanotyrannus. Conclusion on the Cleveland "Nano" skull "Given the obvious closeness of CMNH 7541 and BMR P2002.4.1 "Jane", it would likely have been taxonomically decisive. Our data on CMNH 7541 may be taken as evidence for the validity of N. lancensis on the grounds that it is ‘‘too different’’ from T. rex. However, we are hesitant to argue that the debate over its status is settled for the simple reason of sample size. CMNH 7541 presents one specimen—one highly divergent specimen. Although we see no clear signs of distortion or pathology in the braincase, its divergent nature concerns us, and we maintain that the possibility remains that future discoveries will show CMNH 7541 to be aberrant. For that reason, we urge caution and continue to regard the specimen’s status as open" https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/ar.20983 New Insights Into the Brain, Braincase, and Ear Region of Tyrannosaurs (Dinosauria, Theropoda), with Implications for Sensory Organization and Behavior Lawrence M. Witmer Ryan C. Ridgely First published: 26 August 2009 https://doi.org/10.1002/ar.20983 It's unfortunate that the skeleton Jane does not have the two sketal areas discussed in this topic: Arms and Braincase. More reason for the Dueling Dinosaur Nanotyrannus to be studied. The End...
  8. I have been working hard lately on all of our programs and we are very close to having the dinosaur presentation I want us to have. We have a name for this program, Dinos Rock. Yes it is not super creative but for 2nd graders, this is a geology themed program. For 3rd graders, it is adaptation based but the name works. We have added some pieces that gives us more than a few teeth. Nothing museum quality or anything but a few bones help the visual factor. I have been studying the biology, geology and ecology of dinosaurs so the science will be good. my son is working on the art but we wont have any done soon, he has school projects a head of this. We are close to being ready a full 6 months before I thought we would be. Hell Creek was going to be a focus for us because the fossils are available and this is the fauna that most kids will recognize. If you are willing to look hard, you can also find some real bargains from this formation. We turned a lot of early attention collecting attention to Hell Creek dinosaurs and I am actually really happy with where we are at with the fossil material we have. There is a lot of room to add and maybe upgrade in the future but this is a good start. This is the famous T-Rex and Triceratops fauna and we started our collection with those critters. Very early on, we were able to get a few Hell CreekTriceratops teeth. I am very happy that through a purchase from TFF member, we added two frill pieces. They are Lance formation but we are not covering the Lance formation yet so they will be used here. I also added a frill piece from Hell Creek. The kids will get to touch the largest frill piece which is a great bonus. An iconic dinosaur and I think well represented. Also early on, we stumbled into a great bit of a luck. A TFF member saw a post of ours and passed it on to another TFF member who sold us a beautiful Tyrannosaurus Rex partial tooth and gave us a really nice Nano too. It was very affordable and a generous gift was added that gave us nice pieces from the most famous dinosaur ever. The rock star really. I was not sure we would be able to get a decent example at all but to do it right off the bat was HUGE. This would not have happened if not for the members that decided to help us out. We are extremely grateful The first dinosaur fossil we got were two Hell Creek Edmontosaurus teeth that were a gift. We acquired a nice jaw fragment in a trade. I am a bargain shopper with a limited budget so I LOVE our Edmontosaurus as it has not cost much at all. I named this display Eddie I like it so much lol Hadrosaurs are important dinosaurs to talk about and I think a fair amount of kids may not know about them. I would like to add another bone later too. They seem attainable for us. Acheroraptor was behind only T-rex on the my list and we got a really beautiful tooth and it was another bargain pick up. I will talk a lot about this species and I will get deep into the biology/ecology of this awesome dino because I love Dromaeosaurids. Raptors are also an iconic dinosaur that kids love and this is a relatively new species which is another fun thing to discuss with the kids. We will also be introducing the kids to a theropod they have never heard of, Richardoestesia gilmorei. I have told me son to envision a toothed Cormorant type dinosaur as I lean toward them being a fish eater. It is pretty cool to get a Hell Creek dino that they will not know anything about. We have yet to add a Thescelosaurus fossil but we will before we start presenting. I want to add another piece of the fauna and it seems this is the most inexpensive option we will have. It will also give the kids another dinosaur they probably do not know and it will round out the basic Hell Creek fauna. There is no shortage of dinosaurs that we can add either. An Anky or Nodosaur scute is way up on the program list of fossils for me and hopefully we can find one from this formation. Dakotaraptor is #1 on my personal list and I will get one eventually. A Troodontid is also very high on the list as well. I know eventually i will also pick up an Ornithominid too. All three of these are more expensive so we will have to save and wait but each one would also make awesome educational dinosaurs. I also really want to add an Avian fossil. I have not researched this but my guess is they are very rare. Leptoceratops is another species I would love to add at some point too. They are really cute and kids will dig them. Anyway, here are some of the fossils. I think we have a good start going to our Hell Creek collection and I am looking forward to taking these to work with me very soon. Pic 1- Triceratops teeth and Eddie Pic 2- T-Rex, Nano, and Hell's Thief. I am so happy to have these fossils. Pic 3- One of the frill pieces. This one will end up in a larger Trike display with more teeth and another frill. Plus we will have nice frill for kids to check out too.
  9. I have no idea what this could be, any help would be appreciated. Found near Harding County, South Dakota.
  10. Hell Creek Formation Rooted Tooth ID

    I recently purchased this tooth from a collector at the Tucson Gem and Mineral Show. He wasn't sure if the tooth was Pachy or Thescelosaur but upon looking at it more closely I'm not even sure if it isn't some sort of Ankylosaur. Any help would be great. The tooth was found in the Hell Creek Formation Perkins County, SD. Thanks! Ryan
  11. My son and I recently started an education non-profit using fossils. Since the little kids love dinosaurs, we decided to include them in our programs. I do not know much about Dinosaur fossils but I am trying learning on the fly. There is no way we can pick up a full tooth or large bone from a T-Rex. our purchasing power is limited. I did find a dealer that has several partial teeth or tooth shards listed as T-Rex. They are affordable for us and did come from Hell Creek. I am apprehensive about buying any of them though because I do not want to drop any money on something called a T-Rex unless I can be fairly certain that is what it is. I do not possess enough knowledge to ID a partial tooth nor do I know if you even can correctly identify a tooth shard. I will put to this those here with far more knowledge than I have.... Can you ID a tooth shard as T-Rex and if that is possible, what would you look for ? Thank you in advance for any help that I can get
  12. I've gotten a tooth and need help to identify it. He should comes from Wyoming (Hell Creek Formation) and is about 4,3cm (1.7 inches) tall. A geologist said, he might have come from a Carcharodontosaurus, but he does not come from North America. This is also the brown-black color. Carcharodontosaurus is native to Africa and would rather have sand color. However, I'm not a paleontologist^^. The Nanotyrannosaurus could it also be, if the origin is right. Of course, I also hope that it is not a fake, because on the inside, is a purple spot to see and I've never seen that in a fossil. By weight, it comes in any case to an original. It would be great if you could help me. (By the way, the Seller said it is a animal in family of the Tyrannosauridae)
  13. Hey guys, I´m from Germany and have bought this little tooth from the Hell Creek Formation in Montana. The seller described the tooth as "Dromaeosaur tooth", which belongs possible to Dakotaraptor or Acherorator. I´m not sure about the identification of this tooth and hope, that you can help me. The tooth is 1,27cm (= 1/2") in lenght. Thank you in advance and kind regards!
  14. Hey guys, Hello I am from Germany. That's why I apologize for my bad English. This tooth (top right in the picture) I have recently screaked from the US. The tooth comes from the Hell Creek Formation (Wyoming). It was sold as a "Raptor" tooth. He is about 7mm (0,28") long. I´m not sure, to which dinosaur the tooth belongs, thats why I asked my question in this forum. I hope, that you can help me! Thank you in advance and kind regards!
  15. In the current (July-August 2018) issue of American Scientist magazine there's an article on champsosaurs. Anyone who's collected Late Cretaceous fossils in Montana, the Dakotas, Wyoming, or southern Canada has probably found a few. You tend to get just a paragraph or two about the group in mainstream science articles about animals that survived the K/T extinctions but there's a whole article about them. Check out your local Barnes & Noble if you don't have online access.
  16. The seller put these teeth up for sale and identifies them as unidentified Dromaeosaurus teeth with possibly one being Acheroraptor. Looking for consensus on the identification, thank you for looking
  17. Hello Fossil Forum! I recently purchased a metasequoia cone that is from the Huff, North Dakota area and the place I purchased it from has a tag claiming that it is 85 million years old. I believed it at first, but after some research I am unsure of its age. I have a Mesozoic collection going, so I’d like to know if it is late Cretaceous in age. Thank you!
  18. This weeks round of red flags Recent listings offers a number of very long Spinosaur teeth at very low prices. Most of these have fake roots and more. Avoid and post here before you buy. A member just got taken last week so please be careful. Large rooted teeth are expensive. A finger bone is offered described from a Spinosaurus. I think its a carpal but we have no scientific evidence that this morphology is from a Spinosaur. Its a very nice indeterminate Theropod carpal. This bone is listed coming from a Carcharodontosaurus. We have no idea who is the owner of this bone, no associated foot material has been published for any large Kem Kem Theropod. Best identified as indeterminate Theropod. Lots of fake Dinosaur eggs continue to be listed. Please post interest before you buy. A pair of Aublysodon Premaxillary teeth offered for sale. Reminder this is no longer considered a valid species, they are best identified as Tyrannosaurid indet. Most likely Nanotyrannus.
  19. Triceratops claw?

    Hi, Is this a claw from a Triceratops? it is from the Hell Creek Formation and is slightly over 2 inches in length.
  20. Saw these listed yesterday and the tooth was identified as a T-rex 1.55" long and Vertebra being from a Hadrosaur. Like to have confirmation on those ID's thanks
  21. Theropod skeletons from the Hell Creek Formation are very rare and avian ones are exceeding rare. Here the Black Hills Institute is putting together a replica of a partial Ornithomimosaur skeleton that was found with a complete undistorted skull. The skull and skeleton of this ornithomimosaur probably represent a new taxon according to the BHI. They state: that because this is the first skull from any member of the family Ornithomimosauridae from the Hell Creek Formation, it is impossible to compare it with other specimens. Clearly, however, the skeleton shows some features in the hand and pelvis that separate it from the described Struthiomimus sedens. Like my other BHI topics the photos and comments are from BHI President Pete Larsen. This replica is going to China. Started mounting an undescribed ornithomimosaur today for a Chinese museum. Using our copy in the background to speed up the process. Making progress on the cast of the undescribed ornithomimosaur from the Montana Hell Creek today. This is a very nice skeleton, despite the missing caudals and most of the dorsals More progress on the ornithomimid today. Finished mounting the other pelvic bones, dorsal and cervical vertebrae. Got a little bit done on the ornithomimosaur today. Finished mounting the chevrons and started on mounting the ribs. Mounted a bunch of bones on the ornithomimosaur today. One must be careful when you give a dinosaur a ribbing, because quite often they can be armed. Without complete feet it’s difficult for a dinosaur to move. I guess this ornithomimosaur will have to be toed We finished the ornithomimosaur mount today. Now we have to tear it down and make shipping brackets, readying it for the long painting process. This Hell Creek fossil is one of the great skeletons from the end of the age of dinosaurs. This is despite the fact that it is missing one leg and arm as well as its tail and most of the dorsal vertebrae Probably the most important part preserved is a complete and, for the most part, undistorted skull! One is not finished with mounting a dinosaur until shipping brackets are constructed to imobalize the parts inside a crate, and to be used should the skeleton be put into storage. We finished the mounting of the ornithomimosaur today
  22. David Evans and crew from the ROM have been collecting in the Hell Creek of Montana instead of their usual Judith River localities. They have not reported finding much but today's Twitter feed David posted these pictures and commented "We found dinosaur eggshell today! It’s a rarity for the Hell Creek Formation. Thanks to Wendy Sloboda for her expert help finding it.". Have never been lucky enough to find any and like David indicated they are pretty rare in the HC. @-Andy- @HamptonsDoc @CBchiefski hazard a guess what type they are?
  23. I saw these teeth for sale and the Id's look squirrely but I'm not an expert so look for a positive ID. All from Hell Creek Formation The seller identifies this as a Troodon tooth 1/4" looks more like a Pectinodon The others are being sold as Dromaeosaurus/Raptor All are 1/2" or less. They look like juvie Nanotyrannus
  24. Consolidated all my informational Topics to make it easier to reference. Will keep updating since some of the reference material is outdated. Have to thank @PFOOLEY for suggesting this consolidation and it makes it a lot easier for me to access these topics as well as our members to know what's out there. General Tips in Buying Theropod Teeth Dinosaur Anatomy 101 Stratigraphy of the Late Cretaceous in North America Best Books for Dinosaur Identification Triassic Identification of Dinosaur Teeth from the Triassic of New Mexico Jurassic: Morisson Formation Identification of Theropod Teeth Tips in Buying a Sauropod Foot Claw Ornithischians from the Morisson Formation Jurassic: Europe Dinosaurs of Costal Portugal Jurassic Theropods of Germany Cretaceous: North America Identification of Theropod Teeth in the Hell Creek and Lance Formations Identification of Troodontid Teeth Identification of Tyrannosaurid Teeth From North America Identification of Ankylosaurid Teeth Identification of Acheroraptor Teeth North American Tyrannosaurids what is Described Identification of Claws and Ungals from the Hell Creek and Lance Formations Identification of Pachycephalosaurid and Thescelosaurus Teeth Tooth Features in Tyrannosaurids The Case for Nannotyrannus Dakotaraptor Teeth and Claws Hell Creek Fm Identification of Bones /Claws from Alvarezsaurids from North America Hell Creek Faunal Representation Identification of Theropod Teeth from Judith River and Two Medicine Formations . Theropod Assemblage of New Jersey Cretaceous: Kem Kem of Morocco Kem Kem Theropod Teeth Kem Kem Theropod Tooth Morphology Identification of Sauropod Teeth from the Kem Kem Tips in Purchasing a Spinosaurid Hand Claw Identification of Claws from the Kem Kem Identification of Spinosaurid Jaws from the Kem Kem Republic of Niger Identification of Theropod Teeth Cretaceous: South America Patagonia's Theropod Teeth Cretaceous: Uzbekistan: Identification of Theropod Teeth: Uzbekistan Sauropod Teeth: Uzbekistan Cretaceous: Europe Identifying Baryonyx Teeth
  25. I see a tooth being sold as Aublysodon and the seller also states it could be another juvenile tyrannosaurid My understanding is that this is not a valid species correct. Tooth is around 1/2 "
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