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Found 27 results

  1. Hadrosaur Humerus Repair/Prep

    I recently got this lovely mess of bone, which is a mostly complete hadrosaur right humerus that only requires some assembling. I actually bought this with the idea that it might be a fun project. But then it broke even more in the shipping. So I have my work cut out for me. It's from Judith River formation, Montana. It's hard to tell at the moment, but it seems to be a rather slender humerus. So that would make it more likely to be from the saurolophinae subfamily. But I will look into that some more when I have it assembled. So I will be doing lots of reassembling on this piece as well as prepping away some excess matrix that's still present. Besides the obvious problems, the bone itself is actually in very nice condition with some really smooth cortical bone as well as some lovely visible muscle scars. This is how it looked when I first opened it. Quite a mess. Also a drawing of what it should look like in context. And here I have slightly ordered the pieces. There's 5 big main pieces, three medium pieces and a whole bunch of tiny chunks. One of the bigger pieces that includes the ulnar and radial condyles. The shaft of the bone has had a pretty bad recent fracture. This is also where most of the smaller pieces come from.
  2. pterosaur bones (perhaps Dorygnathus)

    From the album Holzmaden

    This is probably one of my best find so far from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden. Its a plate with some pterosaur bones, which is very rare in Holzmaden as these are marine desposits. The bigger bone might be a Humerus. Before I was able to find this piece I only found a few isolated pterosaur bones. Hopefully I can find a complete one one day The prep of this specimen took about 5 hours. Before the prep it was visible that these are pterosaur bones so I was very surprised ... Some more pictures:
  3. Hello all. I just wanted to share some information about keichousaurus that I found very interesting. Crazyhen recently identified a keich specimen I have as a male. I wondered how he knew that, and did some research. As most of you probably already know, keichousaurus hui was sexually dimorphic! Males can be told apart from females by the proportions and length of the femur and humerus. Males are also often times larger. I included a diagram telling apart the male from the female. A is the female, and B is the male. Thank you all for reading, I enjoyed learning this and hope some of you do as well! https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1671/039.029.0230 https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/full/10.1098/rspb.2015.1658
  4. Florida humerus

    I found this today. Not sure exactly what it is from. It is 6" in length.
  5. I hope you all had a good Christmas and are looking forward to the New Year. I thought I’d treat myself to a Christmas fossil this year. It’s an iguanodon humerus (maybe Mantellisaurus now) from the Isle of Wight. The humerus is about 700 mm long, so pretty big and heavy. I got a local blacksmith to make the stand for me and I picked it up today. Regards Nick
  6. Histology and osteology/Cretaceous

    LINDGR Lindgren, J., Uvdal, P., Engdahl, A., Lee, A. H., Alwmark, C., Bergquist, K-E., ... Jacobs, L. L. (2011). Microspectroscopic evidence of cretaceous bone proteins. PLoS ONE, 6(4), [e19445]. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0019445
  7. Found in South Manatee County in an aggregate pit. Thank you!
  8. Looking for identification for this bone. Possible femur or humerus of a turtle? Found in Manatee County, Florida. Thank you!
  9. Small rodent humerus ? Savannah, Georgia

    Hello, I have what I think is a small humerus from a rodent of some kind ? This is dredge material so it can range from Pliocene to Pleistocene. Was curious if it was possible to determine the type of rodent. I'm assuming it's too small for a capybara type of animal. @MarcoSr does this resemble anything you have seen ? Cheers, Brett
  10. Bird long bones from Uppermost Pleistocene of Lithuania

    Dear Guys, I have collected several interesting bird long bones in the sand dune layers of Varena town, South Lithuania. Judging by the local stratigraphy and history, the sand in varena town is formed in the last glaciation (25- 10 thousand years ago), so there in my bone finds can be some bird genera that do not live in the Baltic Region today. If someone is familiar with ornithology, please take a look and help me to identify bird taxa. Any help will be appreciated! Best Regards Domas At first, I show tibiotarsus fragment of possible big vulture (the largest width in articular part is 2 cm)
  11. Distal end of Left Humerus

    Human? Found in Galveston Bay dredge spoils. Darrow
  12. Bones, bones, bones

    Hello Forum, I picked up a few fossilized bones....two possibly complete and two partials. The gentleman I got them from could only give suggestions as to what the complete bones are - and no idea at all about the partials. I tried grouping the pictures of each together and numbering the group - hopefully this is helpful rather than not. Pic 1: possibly a dinosaur hand or foot bone Pic 2: no idea. Pic 3: possibly a horse humerus. Pic 4: no idea. Locations: Pic 1 - Fort Crittenden Formation, Pics 2 & 4 - possibly either Fort Crittenden Formation or another location in S/E Arizona Pic 3 - Jacksonville Florida. Thank you for any and all assistance.
  13. Help on ID of bone

    So over the Holiday I went shopping in my old town at the Antique stores. Love hitting places like that. You never know what you may find. Well I found an older case of fossils and rocks. They came from a guy in a neighboring town who had the rock, mineral and fossil store. He sold out and these were bought. I will be posting a few in other threads and would love to get names for my collection and knowledge. So. I have no idea of information on this one. Some of you I know will have speculations and that will help narrow down what it is or is not. I believe it is a Humerus bone??? It is 9 inches long. The scale is in inches. It is hard and fossilized. I do wonder about what the cut or groove is on the end. Is that normal or man mad while prepping. If you need any other pics let me know.
  14. Hi, I was out this morning doing some collecting at Bouldnor Cliff (thought I'd mix it up from Hamstead for a change) and came across this distal portion of a mammal humerus lying on a mudflat. I'm regular collector along the north coast and know the vertebrate taxa and stratigraphy like the back of my hand but this humerus is unlike anything I've found before mammal-wise. I noticed straight away that it has a supratrochlear foramen, which from my own knowledge and some online research is a feature often found in canids. Material from amphicyonids like Cynodictis and Amphicyon have been found from the Bouldnor Formation (Rupelian aged, and spans 34.0 - 32.5 mya) but I'm unaware of any canid material, so I was looking to perhaps get a second opinion on whether this is canid, and/or whether the supratrochlear foramen is a reliable indicator of canid/carnivoran material. Any help is much appreciated.
  15. Raptor Arm

    Partial right humerus (upper arm) of an undiscribed Dromaeosaurid. The size is very similar to that of Bambiraptor. This animal was possibly just over a meter long.
  16. Strange mammal bone found

    Dear Guys, I have found one very specific bone fragment which is very hard to me to identify, it is from Late Pleistocene sand layers of Varena town, South Lithuania. The wider part of bone has very strange joint relief and I do not know which animal is this. Please help with ID of this fossil. Best Regards Domas
  17. Mosasaur Humerus?

    Hi everyone. I recently bought this Mosasaur fossil that was labeled as a Tylosaurus Humerus, and i just wanted to check if this is indeed a humerus or another part of a mosasaur because looking at some pictures on the internet of mosasaurs (and Tylosaurs) it could also be a radius. It is 5 and a half inches in length and was collected in the Niobrara Formation in the Smoky Hill Chalk (Kansas). Since i am not an expert on mosasaurs (i am still learning about them) and my knowledge is limited, i was hoping someone who knows about mosasaurs could help out in confirming if this does belong to a Tylosaurus and if it is a humerus or a different part. I do trust the seller i just thought it would be worth posting on the forum to see what others think. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  18. Possible cave hyena humerus

    Dear Guys, Today I found one very interesting piece of bone, I think it is humerus of big carnivorous mammal like hyena. The size of bone is 10,3 cm length and 6,5 cm in the articular part. If it would be Cave hyena, it would be very rare find, my country belongs to Baltic States, Eastern Europe. The age of sand layers in my area is about 10- 13 thousand years. Please help with ID Best Regards Domas
  19. Fossilized humerus?

    Found this in a pile of river rock here in Kansas. It's heavy like a rock. I'm a newbie so need some help. It looks like a humerus to me and you can even see the different colors that show the marrow. From surfing the web I've seen very similar shapes of fossil humerus of porpoise, whale and alligator. Should I get back to that pile and keep looking?
  20. Triceratops horridus humerus bone

    From the album expansa1's Album

    Triceratops horridus humerus bone Length 25 inches 68-66 Million Years Ago Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation Montana North America

    © ©

  21. Triceratops horridus

    From the album expansa1's Album

    Triceratops horridus humerus bone 68-66 MYA. Late Cretaceous 25 inch (63.5cm)

    © ©

  22. Bone of Large bird of México

    What opinion do you have, is a large bird jaw or is another structure? It was found in tufa calcareous with river bivalves of the late Pliocene of north of Mexico.
  23. Bison priscus humerus

    From the album Ice Age Europe

    Distal end of the sinister humerus from a Bison priscus (Steppe Bison). From the Mannheim Formation, Middle Würm Interstadial, 58,000-26,000yo. Germany.
  24. I'm fairly certain this is a humerus, but to what? I am a herpetologist and spend a lot of time along rivers. I came across this today as I was searching for frogs, and I decided to hang on to it to ID it. So far, I have been unsuccessful and I assume you guys are way better at this than me. The bone/fossil doesn't feel as heavy as most fossils I have come across, but it is definitely heavier than bone. It is completely black underneath the crispy tan layer shown in the photographs. It was found in an area along the river bank that had recently been washed out due to recent rains. So I'm not certain if it originated high above the bank or in the wet sand. Thank you, Buddy
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