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Found 10 results

  1. Our last post left off just before the Permian so this is where the students will learn about the series extinction events known as The Great Dying. One of the really interesting points in shark evolution is the survival of sharks during this period. They survived by adapting to a vastly different climate and a much different aquatic world. This is when the Hydobonts really emerge and the age of the modern shark starts. The first species we cover are the xenacanthids. We originally placed the Eel Sharks in the Golden Age of Sharks section but I wanted to illustrate that some that while a few xenacanthid sharks survived the Permian extinction, they died off shortly after. They were apex predators in freshwater ecosystems until 266 mya. The adaptations we hit on are the forked teeth and eel like body. Despite being an apex predator and some initially surviving the Permian, they were unable to survive long term either due to being unable to adapt to long term changes in the aquatic environments they formally dominated or were out competed by animals better adapted or both. The Hybodonts first start appearing in the fossil record in the Carboniferous era and much of the diversity of the family was lost during Permian but Hybodonts would became the dominant shark of the Triassic and lasted until the Miocene. They were varied in form, size, and habitat. Hybodont sharks lived in freshwater environments and marine environments. They are known from fossil formations that are shallow and deep. They evolved to fill a variety of ecological niches. They had different kinds of teeth for different kinds of prey. We specifically touch on Hybodus obtusus, Lissodes minimus, and the tiny, fairly recently described Reticulodus synergus as those are the species we have. My son's early sketch of Reticulodus is super cool. Given that this is smallest shark we are discussing, the art work is the hook more than the micro fossil. This is the one spot in the shark program that is a little visually underwhelming from a fossil standpoint. We have only a few small items so it lacks the visual appeal of the weirdness of earlier sharks and the WOW effect of the giant sharks that follow. This is a very fixable issue for us. I found a source for Orthacanthus teeth and we are planning on picking up a nice dentition set to go with our partial spine. Carter drew his Orthacanthus in a position that will match the dentition and spine when we have the teeth. A weakness now will be a visual strength in a month or two. I would really love to pick up an Anstercanthus tooth and spine too. They seem to be out there on the market from time to time. We plan on grabbing a few more Lissodes teeth and Reticulodus teeth too. A number of small teeth can make a nice display. Here are the fossils we currently have for the presentation Pic 1 Orthacanthus texanus tooth and partial spine of an unidentified Orthacanthus. Both are from Oklahoma I believe. Pic 2 Hybodus obtusus tooth. A small tooth and one that needs some additional material. Pic 3 A picture of all the fossils for the presentation including Lissodes minimus and Reticulodus synergus. Yup the dots are cool shark teeth lol I actually love the tiny sharks and this will be one of my favorite spots in the presentation because we deliver these right before we get into the giant animals that follow.
  2. Hybodus fin spine

    From the album Triassic vertebrate fossils

    This is a 10 cm long Hybodus fin spine from a triassic "Bonebed" in a quarry in southern germany (Baden-Württemberg). Here is the unprepped condition: You could only see the cross section: The prep work took about 4 hours. Two more pictures:
  3. Hybodus shark spines, but what species?

    I have these two Hybodus spines from Morocco and was wondering in anyone could identify them from these pics? I am also wondering if there is a way to distinguish the dorsal and pectoral spines from eachother? Thanks for looking!
  4. Alabama Hunt

    I was invited back this past Tuesday to hunt the same private property as I did a few weeks ago and wound up having another awesome afternoon. Also found another hybodus spine which absolutely made my day. It’s definitely not as nice as the first one but it’s still pretty sweet.
  5. Afternoon hunt in Alabama

    I was able to sneak away for an afternoon hunt yesterday and wound up having an awesome day. I found well over a hundred teeth but the best find of the day for me was this small hybodus fin spine. It’s only 1-7/16” long and 3/8” wide but what it lacks in size it makes up for in character!
  6. Hybodus

    From the album Sharks and fish

    Hybodus Houtienensis shark spine Permian to Cretaceous shark (impressive!!!!!) beautiful serration teeth down the back.
  7. Hybodus sp.

    From the album Sharks from other locations

    Callovian Hybodus sp. from Trakhtemirov, Kanev region, Ukraine.
  8. Firstly, my apologies if I am posting this in the wrong section of the website. I had a lovely morning searching down at Cooden Beach, Sussex uk. Very cold, very early start, setting off in the dark at 6am to get there for sunrise. After 3 hours of fruitless searching, and ready to give up, I came across this hybodus shark skull, showing the first few vertebrae. Cartilage doesn’t fossilise too well here, so looks a bit messy. As pleased as I am with it, I can’t help thinking the remaining section of the nodule was hiding nearby, but I just couldn’t find it. I’ll head back over there in a few weeks and look for the rest of it! If anyone finds it before me please get in contact and I’ll make an offer! thanks Henry
  9. Hi all, Was looking through some fossils online and came across this one. It was in the "Exclusive fossils" section; so I got really surprised seeing this "pebble" in there. The seller claims it is the fossil skull of a Hybodus shark. Now to me this is very weird. As we all know, sharks have a cartilaginous body; so their skeleton doesn't fossilize easily. That's why I am doubtful about the skull of this shark being so well preserved, with the brain and all. Plus, to me this just looks like a funny-shaped pebble. The only thing that makes it more believable for me are the "teeth" in the last closeup photo. I might be completely wrong on my suspicion, and this might indeed be an exceptional incredible piece. But then shouldn't it be more at home in a museum??? What do you guys think? Best regards, Max
  10. Misterious shark fin spine from Nothern Italy

    Hello everyone, I'm a student in Milan and I'm currently struggling in trying to identify this fossil shark fin spine. Which taxon do you think it belongs to ? This speciment had been found in Northern Italy. The exact stratigraphic position is yet to be determined, but I can say for sure it's either Upper Rhaetian or Lower Hettangian. The spine is almost 11 inches long (28 cm, 29,2 cm if you count the missing tip) and is yet incomplete, for it lacks the basal structure and there's a big gap at 1/3 of its lenght (see images below). It also shows a pattern of denticles near the tip ( they stop abruptly 10,5 cm from the tip). The internal morphology feature an enlarged cap layer, a thin enameloid layer (lacking in some spots) near the tip while wider near the base and a thin trunk layer. The lumen, the internal cavity, is rain drop shaped and is filled with matrix for more than half of the spine lenght.
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