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Found 31 results

  1. Hello everyone. I'm a geologist/stratigraphist and I've been studying Missão Velha Formation (Araripe Basin, Brazil Jurassic-Cretaceous) for a couple of years. We found some structures that seem to be trace fossils, but as geologists, we assume ourselves to be slightly ignorant in ecologic behavior of species. The MV Formation are corsed sandstones, well stratified, with few purple siltic-sandstone levels with ped structures. These trace fossils I'll be presenting next resemble the top of one of these siltic-sandstone levels. They are tridimensional and cilindric, with an spheric edge on the bottom and the top is not well seen. It have sort of a stratification, like it was many piled up rings.
  2. Good afternoon everybody! During a fieldtrip in Silesia (Poland) last year I visited a rather large spoiltip looking for plant fossils. The spoils left behind by the mining company indicate they still use (or used) the old method to separate the coal from the surrounding debris, allowing the coal to be 'baked' (e. g. the presence of pyrite that turns into sulphuric acid -h2so4- under the influence of wind and rain, ...) something typical for the majority of spoiltips I visited in Western Europe. Unfortunately I have no detailed geological data on the age of the debris in the spoiltip but there is no doubt this is Silesian (upper Carboniferous) in age. I even tend to think this is Westphalian in age based on the fossils found, but let's keep it to upper Carboniferous to be sure. I found several species of Lepidodendron, some Eusphenopterids, both Stigmaria ficoides and S. stellata, etc... And this never-seen-before 'thing'. My initial thought was that this could be some sort stem/branch but, in my 20 years of collecting Paleozoic plants, I have never seen the repetative triangular pattern that covers the branch (or tube if you like). Perhaps this could be some sort of tracefossil? Since my ichnofossil-knowledge is extremely limited someone here can help me out? The height of the 'tubes' varies between 2 and 3mm. Have a nice day! Sven
  3. This is a retcon of an earlier post I had. Cambrian fossils aren't something one thinks of when they think of Maryland fossil hunting, and perhaps for good reason. The Cambrian rocks of the state are poorly exposed, those few areas where they do outcrop usually being gobbled up in urban sprawl. Compared to sites elsewhere like in Utah or York, Pennsylvania, the Maryland Cambrian is also rather barren. You could probably count on both hands the number of macrospecies in the entire early and middle Cambrian section of the state. But this rarity only makes collecting in it that much more interesting! Luckily for me I'm pretty close by most of these formations, so I have a decent knowledge of the area and outcrops, but even then it took a decent amount of time researching and scouting to find a site. The most recent formation I visited was the Araby Formation. Up until the mid 20th century the Araby was considered part of the Antietam Sandstone further west in the Blue Ridge, but after some more studies done on the formation it was found that it's lithological character was distinct enough to warrant it being a separate unit. Whereas the Antietam is a white quartz sandstone (much like the Oriskany I posted about yesterday) deposited in a beach-like environment, the Araby was deposited in deeper water (compared to the Antietam) and is more a mixture of siltstones, shales, phyllites, and slates. Together with the Antietam the Araby has some of the oldest fossils in the state dating back to the early Cambrian period some 540 million years ago. This makes it the oldest formation in the Frederick Valley. For those that don't know the Frederick Valley is a predominantly limestone syncline in west central Maryland (I consider it western Maryland, but most people probably wouldn't). At it's core is the early Ordovician Grove Limestone (which has practically no fossils), and on it's flanks are the late Cambrian Frederick Limestone (fossiliferous in parts, but those parts are very rare) and finally the Araby Formation. The Araby takes up positions along the far flanks of the valley, and it's eastern boundary with the metamorphic rocks of the Westminster Terrane marks the Martic Fault (no Washingtonians you don't need to worry about a San Andrea, from what I've read the Martic has been inactive for a long, long time). Due to it's sediment type and that of the surrounding rocks, the Araby is also a minor ridge forming unit, holding up the series of hills that flank Frederick Valley's eastern edge. These hills are nicely visible from the grounds of Monocacy National Battlefield, which is also of interest for marking the site of the northernmost Confederate victory (July 9, 1864 for those who're curious) in the Civil War. This ridge forming aspect means that, although very thin and covering a very small area, the Araby Formation has multiple exposures throughout the Frederick Valley. Some of the better ones are visible along I-70 just east of it's crossing over Monocacy River (an MGS team found some trilobites there) and MD-355 as you drive through the woods before hitting Araby Church Road (I believe the namesake for the formation is actually the Araby Church). In terms of fossils the Araby is almost exclusively dominated by the trace fossil Skolithos linearis, an annelid worm burrow. Other fossils found in it, however, include echinoderms and Olenellus sp. trilobites. As another aside the Cash Smith Shale, once held as an independent formation, also has trilobites and I believe inarticulate brachiopods reported from it, however it is no longer considered an independent formation but rather a member of the Araby Formation. Almost all of my fossils were the worm burrows, still cool but for everyone's sake I won't constantly repeat what they are this time around. Image 1: The largest burrow I've found. I originally thought it was a genal spine from a trilobite due to it's size. Image 2: Cross section of a burrow, outlined by the iron oxide stain. Image 3: Another burrow, this one roughly outlined by the iron oxide. Image 4: The large tubular structure covered in iron oxide (you might be noticing a pattern here with the oxides and burrows. I can't say definitively if they're connected in some way, but oftentimes you'll find the one with the other).
  4. Hello all! I was lucky enough to spend the afternoon today in the warm-but-not-too-hot sunshine at Mimico Creek in Toronto, ON (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician), and I have a couple of things that I'd like you to have a look at: Picture #1: A view of Mimico Creek Pictures #2 and #3: A bivalve and a possible graptolite - what do you think? Pictures #4 and #5: An ichnofossil - do you think it could be Cruziana, or is it something else? Thanks so much for your help!!! Monica
  5. Possible Batrachopus Track

    From the album FreeRuin's Finds

    It looks the part of a Batrachopus footprint (missing a toe) with the proper size and location but I cannot say for sure. Hartford Basin Portland Formation Western Massachusetts
  6. Small Footprint

    From the album FreeRuin's Finds

    Either a small footprint or a partial one I believe it to be a Grallator due to its shape and size. Picked it up while hiking. Hartford Basin Portland Formation Massachusetts
  7. Ichnofossil ID

    Hello, I found these ichnofossils in a Eocene formation. Can you help me identifying them? Thank you
  8. Ichnofossil?

    I found these near the Valley of Fire in Nevada. From what I've researched, the area used to be underwater from 500 million years ago to 250 million years ago. I presume these are ichnofossils of a burrow made by some animal (brachiopod)? The first photo is a burrow in situ. The second photo shows all three burrows. What do you guys think these are? - Seann
  9. Hi all, I was wondering: would the steinkern of for example a Turritella be considered a fossil or an ichnofossil? Because in fact, the shell itself didn’t become a fossil, and what we are looking at is just sediment that filled in the shell and then solidified. But then again I’ve never heard of a steinkern being referred as an ichnofossil... So what do you guys think: really a fossil, or just a trace fossil? I am curious to see everyone’s opinion Best regards, Max
  10. Hello, this is a part 2 of my last thread with some of my other finds that I've found this at a site in new jersey where some footprints have been found from the Late Triassic/Early Jurassic, I am unsure about if these are footprints of sorts, any help will be appreciated thank you!
  11. Hello, I've found this at a site in new jersey where some footprints have been found from the Late Triassic/Early Jurassic, I am unsure about if this is a footprint of sorts, any help will be appreciated thank you!
  12. What's this trace fossil?

    Found this slab today. Early Pennsylvanian. The brown blotches are lepidodendron leaves I believe. They've stained the surrounding stone. Edit: I should probably add that it's from southern Indiana.
  13. What is name of the trace fossil?

    Hellow Guys, I have the doubt, the trace fossil of the picture is a rhizocorallium, diplocraterion or taenidium? Or none of those three?
  14. Haida Gwaii trip

    I was holidaying on Haida Gwaii (previously known as Queen Charlotte Islands) and had an afternoon on a beach near Tlell. We were actually keeping our eyes peeled for agates but I did come up with one interesting nugget. Maybe somebody knows what this might be?
  15. Phycodes ottawense

    While going through some old trip buckets, I found this at the bottom. I had initially picked it up because of its interesting appearance but forgot I had it. As far as ichnofossils go, it is a neat one with all its tangled parts, culminating in a kind of "mop head" appearance. I don't generally pick up ichnofossils, but this one was a notable exception. These are formed when organisms such as worms repeatedly burrow into sediment.
  16. Cruziana

    From the album Collection

    Gold rectangle is business card size.

    © fruitoftheZOOM

  17. Rusophycus

    From the album Collection

    © fruitoftheZOOM

  18. Hi all, I just acquired this interesting specimen that was identified by the seller as Helicodromites mobilis. However, when trying to verify this, the images and description I've been able to find really don't seem to match. The whorls on this are flat and attached to the core. To me, it looks more like a cast of a shark egg case. Are any of you familiar with H. mobilis? Thoughts? Thanks for taking a look!
  19. Curiosity question for any of you who may have some Plio-Pleistocene coral samples from Florida or possibly elsewhere... I'm wondering if any of you knowingly or unknowingly have one of these crescent shaped fossil crab burrows as shown below? I was checking with Roger Portell at FL Museum of Nat History about some other types of traces/things and he shared a recent article he coauthored. Trace fossil evidence of coral-inhabiting crabs (Cryptochiridae) and its implications for growth and paleobiogeography Adiël A. Klompmaker , Roger W. Portell & Sancia E.T. van der Meij Scientific Reports 6, Article number: 23443 (2016) 've begun going thru all my samples and cant find that I have an example yet. Darn it! I'm wondering if any of you have one of these little traces? If yes, I'd love to see a photo! Here's a shot of them in Figure 2 from his article but they have other figures with other types of corals and locales.. Joe (Fruitbat) has linked the document in his reference section in Scientific American. Way to go Joe! https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Sancia_Van_der_Meij/publication/299392850_Trace_fossil_evidence_of_coral-inhabiting_crabs_Cryptochiridae_and_its_implications_for_growth_and_paleobiogeography/links/56f3be8408ae7c1fda297721.pdf?origin=publication_detail I see its also in Nature.com as well--not sure if there is any difference-I do like the zoom feature they have for the figures. http://www.nature.com/articles/srep23443 Hoping one of you has one! Regards, Chris
  20. Found in Watchet UK last year

    Hi All Last year I was at Watchet Somerset Uk and found the fossil attached i think it is a trace. I did initially think it was a fish but unfortunately not. thoughts greatly appreciated. The last one is I think a trace of a echinoderm. this came from Charmouth.
  21. Diplichnites gouldi

    From the album Ichnofossils

    This is a trace attributed to a myriapod athropod (centipede or millipede). It is on the obverse side as the Nanopus prints in the previous image.
  22. From the album Ichnofossils

    Collected at the Union Chapel Mine in north-central Alabama. Age is Pennsylvanian. This is the counterpart of an 'underprint' just a layer or two beneath the actual track layer. The little guy's claws penetrated the mud and made some scratch prints at this level. At the top of this piece, you can see a trace perhaps a layer above the actual print layer. Here, a tail drag mark is visible.
  23. From the album Ichnofossils

    Collected at the Union Chapel Mine in north-central Alabama. Age is Pennsylvanian. This is an 'underprint' just a layer or two beneath the actual track layer. The little guy's claws penetrated the mud and made some scratch prints at this level.
  24. Here is one that has me stumped. It was purchased as a possible coprolite. However, unless the critter ate a lot of dirt, I'm thinking it is some sort of steinkern. It has a smooth texture on the outside (like it was coating in a thin layer of iron-rich silt, but is very gritty on the inside. It was found near turtle remains. I will post a microscopic image in the next window. I have come across similar configurations (on a much smaller scale) in the Rattlesnake Creek micro matrix, but I don't know what those are either. I apologize in advance for the quality of this photo. I would happily retake it at a better resolution if anyone thinks it would help. Thanks for looking!
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