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Found 219 results

  1. Ichthyosaur or pliosaur tooth?

    Hello all I acquired this tooth recently. It's those famous russian deposits that produce ichthyosaur and pliosaur remains. I bought it as an ichthyosaur tooth, but could it be it's pliosaur? I've noticed rootef ichthyosaur teeth have a bit different root, like a pronged root. But I'm hardly an expert so I'd greatly appreciate feedback from others
  2. I have just seen this for sale and while it could potentially be a nice addition to my daughter’s ichthyosaur collection, the attempted prep is a bit off putting. The seller says it’s on ‘calcite beef’. How difficult would it be to just tidy up those air scribe marks? I don’t see the need for any further exposure, just a bit of tidying. Do forum rules allow me to ask what the appropriate cost of getting this done professionally would be if I didn’t fancy attempting it? Thank you for looking
  3. Hi, I am interested in this. Sold here, seller says its ok to have a second pair of eyes look it over. From Holzmaden. Slab is 50cm. Jaw is 14cm. Seller thinks jaw has been added. My main concern is have the vertebra been added too? Thanks
  4. Whitby area Vertebra

    Braved the cold today to have a long walk around Runswick Bay and beyond. Best find was this vertebra, found in a slab of ammonites. Needs a little more prep to get the shale off. Any idea if it’s Ichthyosaur or something else?
  5. I propose to buy this specimen if it is real. The seller told me that this specimen should belong to the pliosaur based on his experience, but I had a hard time to identify whether it is an ichthyosaur tooth or a pliosaur tooth. Is it an ichthyosaur tooth or a pliosaur tooth?
  6. New 'sea dragon' species discovered by amateur fossil hunter off English coast By Jack Guy, CNN, December 10, 2020 The open access paper is: Jacobs, M.L. and Martill, D.M., 2020. A new ophthalmosaurid ichthyosaur from the Upper Jurassic (Early Tithonian) Kimmeridge Clay of Dorset, UK, with implications for Late Jurassic ichthyosaur diversity. Plos one, 15(12), p.e0241700. Yours, Paul H.
  7. Hello all- With a five day weekend and some pretty good weather (for late November), and the honey-dos done it was time for a day in the field. I went to a new part of a ranch that I have only been to several times. Previous finds include an ichthyosaur snout and two plesiosaur verts. The goal was Jurassic ichthyosaur bones. But this place has a series of fossiliferous horizons to explore. Other targets included articulated Jurassic crinoids, pterodactyl tracks, and small dinosaur bones. I say small bones because it was a mile and a half (2.5 km) walk to the bottom of the hill with Morrison Formation, home to Jurassic dinos. And there is no way I was going to haul out anything like a sauropod femur today. I don't even want to find one. The same dilemma can be said of any accumulations of ichthyosaur bones I might find, but I was willing to do a bit more hauling for ichthyosaurs. It was about an hour and half drive. I got there at about 11:30 (lazy breakfast) so I had about 3 hours in the field. Without boring you all with details, I got skunked in the crinoids, pterosaur tracks and ichthyosaurs. But the dinosaurs showed up. Here are a few bones. What, you say you can't see any bones? They are in the dark spot in the base of the cliff. Here is a better view. But these are cross-sectioned (=half missing) and at the base of a boulder. They will stay there for another long time. But in the foreground are a few blocks of sandstone from a recent cliff fall. This looked like a good place to search. And it worked. Here is the find of the day. A nice theropod tooth. Allosaurus is the common theropod in the Morrison but is is twice the size of an Allo tooth. I'll have to look it up after I get it prepped. I thought that was the find of the day, but near the other end of the cliff fall... I pulled a basketball sized rock out of the rubble because I could see bone bits in it. Got a bunch of chunkosaurs and an interesting vertebra... and this little jaw. I thought it was crocodile until I saw the teeth. It is a little ornithopod. When the rock split, it split right along the tops of those teeth, but the rightmost tooth is complete and there are likely more in the rock. I did keep as many of the wee bits of teeth as possible. Wish me luck in matching them to their homes. I did find a more regular sized bone, probably a vertebra, but I left it for now... see comments above about the mile and a half walk. But I also found a road that will get me much closer, so I am going back tomorrow (with the landowner's blessing) to get it and see what else this limited available layer has to offer. A large tooth and a jaw in one place in a couple hours is really quite good for any dinosaur site. The birdwatching tally for today was pretty low but included a quality sighting... one bald eagle, a golden eagle, three ravens, four magpies, three horned larks and two of these guys... Gray-capped rosy finch. These guys come down from the mountains in the winter and can be seen in the plains of Wyoming, but they are not common, unless you run into a flock of 200, or have bird feeders out in the plains.
  8. Hey guys, I just posted a video where I find some huge verts from an Ichthyosaur (towards the end of the video) They're the biggest articulated backbones that i've found!
  9. Ichthyosaur Paddle

    Hey guys, I just posted a video where i find the 3rd joining piece to a big partial ichthyosaur paddle that i've found afew months back. Also some other ammonites and other interesting bits along the way. Hopefully you enjoy.
  10. Unidentified bone

    I recently bought a bit of a job lot of things online just to get an ichthyosaur tooth for my daughter’s collection. Along with the tooth, an ichthyosaur bone and some acrodus teeth was this. The seller stated that it is from the Rhaetic bone bed in Somerset and is triassic. It looks a lot like the other ichthyosaur bone in the lot, but is anyone able to identify it? Thank you for looking
  11. Hi all! I was finally able to visit the Volga site thanks to a water level/ good weather window. The journey was mostly a success, I got a better understanding of the site, used new means of transportation and examined more of the shoreline. Among the finds were two dozens of marine reptile verts and bone fragments and LOTS of ammonites and other mollusks. Unfortunately the river level was not low enough, 1m higher than during my 1st trip, 0,5m lower than in the 2nd. But it was at least possible to walk the shore. There's still a lot more to do, but now I have a pretty clear idea how to maximize the hunt results for the next trip. The report will be picture-heavy and divided into several blocks I'll be adding in the next few days. Let's start with the scenery.
  12. Large Ichthyosaur Vertebra, Penarth, Wales

    Hey everyone, I recently acquired this ichthyosaur vertebra that was originally collected in Penarth, south Wales, UK. What initially struck me was the vertebra's size, since it's by far the biggest one I have of any ichthyosaur: Now, other large ichthyosaur remains have been described from the very same location. The paper is freely available here: https://bioone.org/journals/acta-palaeontologica-polonica/volume-60/issue-4/app.00062.2014/A-Mysterious-Giant-Ichthyosaur-from-the-Lowermost-Jurassic-of-Wales/10.4202/app.00062.2014.full The cliffs at Penarth apparently contain multiple exposures of different formations, which can make assigning isolated remains from there to any one time period problematic. The authors tentatively date the bone described in the paper to the lowermost Jurassic based on attached matrix and microfossils it contains. Finding references for the sediment of each formation from this locality is tough, but the matrix on my vertebra resembles that in the paper at least superficially. I have tried contacting Dr. Peggy Vincent, a co-author of the study who works on Jurassic marine reptiles from Europe, but sadly no luck thus far. My questions are: - Are there any features that might help date this fossil to a certain time period, or identify the formation it originated from? - The authors of the study assign their fossil to Shastasauridae - are there any features that can identify this vertebra on a family level? Thank you for your help!
  13. This looks authentic to me but I wanted to be sure. The fossils in the background of these photos kind of raised some red flags for me, especially the air holes in the trilobite mortality plate on the left. Ichthyosaur bones on a fossil plate, origin is listed as Posidonia Shale Formation, Holzmaden, Germany. Thanks friends!
  14. Whitby area find; bone?

    Just found this at the base of a scree slope somewhere between Runswick Bay and Sandsend (too excited to wait until I’m home to take pictures with a ruler, sorry ) Pretty sure it looks like bone of some sort; can anyone confirm this and maybe identify it? Thanks for looking
  15. I thought some of you may find this interesting. This is an Ichthyosaur paddle digit that looks like there could be a tooth hole in the middle. This could have happened during life or after it had died and then been scavenged on the seabed. Of course there could be another explanation that it has been crushed during fossilisation, but this doesnt look like the usual crushed type specimins i’ve found. Wondered what your thoughts are? Found in Whitby, Yorkshire. Normal looking side Bitten? Side
  16. Whitby find - bone/wood?

    Just found this on a morning stroll on a beach near Whitby, North Yorkshire, UK. Thought at best it may be a piece of reptile bone, maybe a piece of wood if not. Saw some nice plant material too, we were going to pick the larger pieces up on our return trip but the incoming tide made us decide against it. Thanks for looking
  17. Another unknown piece, but at least with some information on its locale - Lavernock, Wales, UK. I believe it to be either Ichthyosaur or Plesiosaur but I'm afraid I don't currently have an idea what it is. I'd appreciate any input. Thank you, John
  18. Ichthyosaur vertebrae

    I bought this ichthyosaur vertebrae several years ago. The website write that the vertebrae is from Brachypterygius. Do you know if it is true? AGE Middle Jurassic LOCATION Weymouth Harbour, Dorest, England FORMATION Kimmeridge Clay SIZE 3.2" wide, 1.2" tall
  19. Out of place shaped rock/fossil?

    Hey all, I'll jump right into some details about this recent rock/fossil find. Backstory: Taking a quick break from driving and stopped along a shale riverbank (I'll include pics) to look at potential fishing spots and to flip some floating shale for signs of fossils. My subconscious picks out this rather rough "puck" shaped specimen and screams to me "Pick it up!" First thought, column vertebrae of some kind. The reason my eye caught this rock was it's round shape against all the sharp edges of shale that is was loosely lying in. Location: North Eastern BC, Tumbler Ridge, Wapiti River. (This area is known for fossil fishes and ichthyosaur) Discovery Strata: Semi loose, weathered riverbed shale. Fossil/Rock geology: Sandy sediment like. Maybe siltstone. Although hard, my pick won't touch it like it will shale. Other notes: The only round piece of geology in the find area, looked too out of place to dismiss. Notably heavier than any rock or shale of similar size. VERY rough/course on the skin/fingertips. Salty taste/sticks to tongue. Not far from other documented Elasmobrachii finds. Almost exactly 2inches in diameter, 0.8inches think, with one plane being flat while the other has a worn groove. I don't know how to post multiple pictures in on post so I'll post one, and link the rest to my Google photos album! Google Photos album Link Thanks in advance!
  20. Hi all! Following the first topic I'll show you another fossil layer in that same location, Epivirgatites nikitini ammonite zone. It's the lowest of the three layers in Fili Park, relates to the middle Tithonian (Volgian, upper Jurassic) and is known for big ammonites and vertebrate remains. It's the last remaining accessible site in the region where you can count on finding Jurassic vertebrates. The finds are stable, but small, scarce and involve sifting.
  21. My 9 year old daughter’s collection had outgrown the old shelves so we took a trip to Ikea today to get something more suitable. Though I don’t think it’ll be long before this one is full too... From top to bottom; ‘Ice Age’ A mammoth tooth, couple of mammoth ribs and a few other bits Purchases A few things we’ve bought, including some fish, a nice display of pecten and a few teeth (plesiosaur, mosasaur, spino) North Yorkshire finds The best of our finds on the coast (excluding ammonites) including a lot of belemnites, bivalves and a couple of ichthyosaur verts Other purchases A potamon and a pea crab, a few trilobites and other bits and pieces Ammonites Nearly all found ourselves on the coast but a couple of purchases too. Local river finds Some rugose coral, crinoids, stigmaria and a few brachiopods Hoping to add plenty of interesting new fossils with a week on the Jurassic Coast in August
  22. I visted Aust Cliff on the River Severn, Gloucestershire UK back in Feburary and managed to find a large block of the 'Rhaetic Bone Bed' . Lots of bone fragments, fish teeth, even a shark fin spine! But my best finds are a paddle bone and large tooth. (Still got plenty more rock pieces to break open and search for more, so a long term project...) However i would like to I.D this Ichthyosaur in particular. Does anyone know about the early ichthyosaurs from the late Triassic? Age: 208 - 201mya (Late Triassic: Rhaetian) - Aust Cliff Paddle bone - humerus? Tooth (broken off tip sadly):
  23. Hello, new to posting on the forum and fairly new to fossil hunting. Found these very nice marine reptile vertabrae near Osmington Mills, Dorset. All found close together washed out of the Kimmeridgian Clay I think... Age: Oxfordian/Kimmeridgian? 163 - 152mya (both rock types there but I believe the clay cliffs above the beach are Kimmeridgian. Can anyone confirm I have 2 different types (Plesiosaur & Ichthyosaur)? Also any guesses at what species they are likely to be or is it not possible to narrow down from a more generic Ichthyosaurus sp./ Plesiosaurus sp. ? The "Plesiosaur" Vertebra, more chunky and flatter with pits on side. (Could this be a type of Pliosaur like Liopleurodon or Pliosaurus sp. ?)
  24. Marine reptile tooth ID Lyme Regis

    Hi all, Bought this tooth online a while back. It was sold to me as "Ichthyosaurus platyodon" (which I understand to mean Temnodontosaurus platyodon) from Lyme Regis. Likely found by the seller themselves, as I know they occasionally collect fossils there. However, for the following reasons, I'm not sure about this attribution: Overall, the tooth doesn't look like your typical ichthyosaur tooth to me: It has more of an oval rather than round cross-section It's labolingually flattened Messial and distal carinae run the full length of the crown and divide the tooth into labial and lingual parts While fine striations can be seen on one side of the tooth (presumably the lingual side), the other side (which would be the labial) seems entirely smooth - though some traces of rare striations can be seen on the photographs The striations are much more similar to those of crocodile or pliosaur teeth than to the plicidentine condition so typical of ichthyosaurs The horizontal banding on the tooth surface is unfamiliar to me with respect to most marine reptile teeth I have seen, but occurs much more frequently on crocodile teeth of various species I also bought another tooth with the same attribution from the seller, more or less around the same time. This one has no striations whatsoever, has a more rounded base, is less flattened and has a more rounded tip. It also has carinae. I therefore reclassified it as a probable Goniopholis sp. crocodile tooth. Now I know that not having the root makes it more difficult to identify this particular specimen, but I was hoping someone on this forum might be able to help me, as currently it goes without label. I've considered crocodile, plesiosaur and even pliosaur, but all of these have some reservations that prevent final classification. For one, none of these groups have teeth that are typically flattened like this, nor do plesiosaurs (sensu lato, thus including pliosaurs) have carinae. Crocodiles, then again, would either have or not have striations all around the tooth. And what to make of the banding: is this just preservational, or does it reflect the internal structure of the tooth - i.e. outcome of the tooth's ontological growth? Tooth measures 18 mm and is missing the tip. Thanks in advance for your help!
  25. Hello, Saw this for sale, wondering if it is legit? Found in Guixhou, part of an old collection from the 60s. Matrix is 12 inch x 6.6 inch x 2.2 inch. Desriptions says no restorations but it has been glued. Thanks for the help
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