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Found 177 results

  1. On Saturday I posted pics from a Fossil Hunting Trip that I did the day before at a road cut in Ogelsby, Illinois.This area contains fossils from this formation- La Salle Limestone member of the Bond Formation (Missourian, Pennsylvanian) Unit 3. On of the pics that I posted was of something that I did not recognize and as always happens on the forum, someone responds with an identification. FF Member @Archie (Sam) stated that it was a Peripristis shark tooth and later stated that it was the lingual view. I then did some searching on the internet for pictures of this type of tooth and Sam was right on. During my search, I also came across an article titled "Pennsylvanian (Late Carboniferous) chondrichtyans from the LaSalle limestone member (Bond Formation) of Illinois, USA. This paper was written by Dr. Stephen L. Brusatte , who is a Chancellor's Fellow in Vertebrate Paleontology at the University of Edinburgh- (He grew up in Ottawa, IL. a town very close to Oglesby). Dr. Brusatte is an American Paleontologist and Evolutionary Biologist who specializes in the anatomy and evolution of dinosaurs. I found his e-mail address and late last night I e-mailed him pictures of this tooth and he responded early this morning and confirmed what Sam had stated. He further stated that "shark teeth are quite rare in the Pennsylvanian rocks of the Oglesby area". Sam, thanks again for helping me out with this ID.
  2. The open access paper is: Clements, T., Purnell, M. and Gabbott, S., 2018. The Mazon Creek Lagerstätte: a diverse late Paleozoic ecosystem entombed within siderite concretions. Journal of the Geological Society. Journal of the Geological Society (2018) 176 (1): 1-11. https://doi.org/10.1144/jgs2018-088 https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/sepm/jgs/article/545488/the-mazon-creek-lagerstatte-a-diverse-late https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/jgs/issue/current Another open access paper is: Briggs, D.E., Liu, H.P., McKay, R.M. and Witzke, B.J., 2018. The Winneshiek biota: exceptionally well-preserved fossils in a Middle Ordovician impact crater. Journal of the Geological Society, 175(6), pp.865-874. https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/jgs/article/175/6/865/548502/the-winneshiek-biota-exceptionally-well-preserved https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/jgs/issue/175/6 Yours, Paul H.
  3. Southern Illinois Unknowns

    I recently made my first trip to a roadcut south of Columbia Illinois. I found a lot of crinoid stems, brachs and bryozoans. I found somethings that I'm not sure what they are. With these, my first instinct was crinoids or maybe cephalopods that had somehow split vertically. IMG_0977.MOV
  4. This weekend's finds

    One more from the same spot.
  5. Identification needed!

    Asking for help with hopefully identifying this. Any help is greatly appreciated!
  6. My first post and big find!

    Can anyone help me identify these? Ì have found these on my property where some excavation work was done. A hillside was excavated and I started finding these around the 4 foot mark. I have so many more. I believe I've stumbled across a whole colony of something that was killed off at the same time. Any input is tremendously appreciated!
  7. Yesterday, New Year's Eve, I was running a few errands and decided to make a little detour to check out the old long abandoned Hawthorne Quarry in Chicago. Over the past few years I've been trying to obtain samples of Silurian fossil corals from the Chicagoland region and I've been waiting to check this locale off my list. The quarry was abandoned in 1915 and subsequently filled with garbage. But that doesn't necessarily mean old rocks from the quarry aren't still lying about. Here is a picture of the quarry in operation dated 1890. Here it is today ( or, rather, yesterday..) Garbage everywhere, imagine that! But certainly there must be some random fossiliferous rocks strewn about somewhere. As I was poking around, three gentlemen from the camp approached, very nice, and were curious who I was and what I was doing. They were a little confused when I tried to explain what I was doing and politely asked if I could spare a dollar. I gave them some cash and wished them a "happy new year". Continued my search. I turned over a large promising looking slab and found .... a hibernating snake and assorted creepy crawlies. I carefully replaced the slab and searched elsewhere. But, are there any fossils to be found here? After not finding much , I found a large muddy rock with crinoid fragments peeking out and decided to grab it. This is what I found after got home. Trilobite glabella? A large bivalve with coral Continued....
  8. Mazon Creek fossil plants: Part 1

    Hi guys! Long story short, a rather large collection of Mazon Creek fossils has been donated to my university. I thought I'd share some pictures of the collection and confirm some preliminary identifications. There are a lot of specimens so I will probably split this into two posts. Annularia radiata Annularia stellata A whole bunch of Annularia stellata?
  9. I found this rock 50 years ago on the farm where I grew up in northern Illinois. The bedrock is far below the surface there. The surface rocks are erratics, dropped by glaciers that moved southwest from Canada through Michigan and into Illinois. It appears to be a kind of agate with some druzy quartz on it. I've recently shown it to several people and have gotten several different opinions on what it is and how it was formed, including that it is some kind of fossil. What do you think? The surface lines you see in some of the photos (most clearly in the third photo) are narrow and evenly spaced. There are about eight lines per millimeter. I increased the contrast in the ninth photo in an attempt to make the lines more visible. The other photos have not been manipulated, except by cropping. The pit in the third photo is about 2mm x 3mm and about 15mm deep.
  10. Locations Near Central Illinois

    I need help finding locations near or in central Illinois. I was planning on going to Fern Glen, but I was wondering if the entire area is open to the public. If not what good locations are?
  11. Late Carboniferous fish or Tetrapod bit?

    Just finished the prep on this guy. When i first found this i thought it was a jaw. Now after it's finished it looks more like a possible pectoral girdle or gill plate/skull element from a lobed finned fish/tetrapod. What do you guys see? I can not find anything like it on thee ol' interwebs. It's late Carboniferous and i have found everything from micro to large fish scales, flora, Orthacanthus teeth and other bone chunks in this same layer. Also there is a neat impression of a Lepidodendron on the underside of this piece. Kinda a nice touch when fish were evolving to walk on land. And pictures really don't do this thing justice. It's very detailed and three dimensional. As Found After some prep and still thinking 'jaw' Finished prep. It's not a jaw. Haha Lepidodendron Any help or direction is much appreicated! @Fossildude19 @Archie @jdp @Carl any thoughts?
  12. I'm happy to announce i possibly found the most complete Listracanthus to date. And we may finally get a proper ID for this strange creature. I thought this was regurgitation, but while prepping i believe i ran into cartilage. So i will stop prepping and give this to a professional, or at least let someone with more experience look at this. Unfortunately the rest is in a giant wall of black shale that i won't be able to get back to until next Spring/Summer. The denticles are up to 6mm thick and associated with smaller denticles. I will get more pictures under a scope when i get a chance. God willing i will recover the rest of this creature in 2019. Happy hunting! Possible cartilage
  13. I found this large fish scale from the late Carboniferous. When i originally found this i thought it was a shark crush tooth, but after more and more prep it turned out to be a large fish scale that i can not identify. Any help or direction is much appreciated. The scale is about 21mm x 24mm As found with a bit of prep. After prep under 10x stereoscope
  14. Found all three of these at different times in Kankakee River State Park in Illinois. In the river. Two of them were just laying out. I got the other one hammering rocks. The rock it was embedded in was kind of a medium sandstone. (EDIT - I'm just attaching two because of the MB limit. You can see one of them from two different angles, including the interesting stuff in the middle, and the other from a single angle. I can post more if needed). I'm fascinated by the three-dimensional quality of these. The one - you can see pretty well - even seems to have some internal structure visible, looks like a notochord, but who knows. Anyway, at first I thought that I had Tully Monsters, until I learned those are never found in this form or location. Then I thought maybe I had ammonites, but apparently those are very rare in the Midwest, so I'm not so sure. What do we think?
  15. Mazon Creek ID

    An unknown I found at Braidwood, IL, Mazon Creek material. Forgot scale but about 2" wide and 1" long. It was in a marine area.
  16. Edestus teeth

    From the album Sharks and fish

    The shark relative is genus of eugenodontia holocephalid from the Carboniferous-Pennsylvanian age Anna shale formation, Carbondale group, found in different Illinois coal mines. I dont know(yet)which mine these were found in. This unidentified species is of the "vorax-serratus- crenulatus-heinrichi" or "E. heinrichi group", with the teeth being more of a standard triangular shape, as opposed to being thinner and pointed at a forward angle as in the "E. minor" group http://www.thefossilforum.com/applications/core/interface/file/attachment.php?id=501751
  17. Rockford, IL fossil sites

    Hi there I live in Sharon, WI. I am curious in want to take my kids to fossil sites to one of fossil sites as they love to look for fossils. Is there any fossil sites around Rockford, IL that I could take my kids so kids' curiousity can be satisfied. Thanks! BTW Mason Creek is too far for now.
  18. Last Weekend, August 18th and 19th 2018, was the annual Canal Corridor Mazon River Fossil Field Trip. The weather was perfect! There was a great presentation by Andrew Young on August 18th and Dave Dolak on August 19th. Afterwards, the dinner was excellent, as usual. It was a very productive outing for all involved. I have a couple buckets of concretions to freeze/thaw throughout the winter. It's always a fun trip, can't wait for it again next year! Saturday's lecture before collecting A perfect day! An amazing Alethopteris serlii, which was brought by one of the participants. I believe this was collected from the Dresden area, as it was known for large concretions. Concretions Everyone was tired at the end of the day! A few examples of what was found...
  19. Mazon Creek Unknown

    I need some help with a pit 11 unknown. Reminders me oy a “Y” but it has bulbous ends on the appendages. Any thoughts? Pat
  20. Parking lot trilobite find

    There have been some great reports in the last week of folks hunting the Silurian and I wanted to add a report for my own serendipitous mini-trip from the last weekend. A few months ago, I had noticed a large pile of buff-colored stone dumped next to a retention pond in front of a local retail district. I thought they looked very similar to the Silurian dolomite I have seen and collected from elsewhere in Illinois, so I have been meaning to take a closer look. Last weekend I finally had some errands to run at Target with some free time on my hands, so I wandered over to the pile to check it out. In less than a minute I spotted a friendly face poking out of the corner of one piece of stone- Gravicalymene celebra! An iconic trilobite, and the biggest one I have found, with a cephalon just over 1 inch wide. It looks like it may be complete, although prep can be very difficult as @aek mentioned recently- at a minimum the cephalon appears to all be there. I looked around a little more and found a very poorly preserved cephalopod impression as well as one other rock with some intriguing shapes in it- it will need more prep though to say if it is anything. Since these were dumped next to a parking lot and there are no Silurian dolomite quarries within 60 miles, I can't say for sure what the source is. It seems likely to be the Racine or Joliet Dolomite of northeastern Illinois, though. I will definitely be returning when I have some free time and looking around some more- who knows, they may have used the same stone in other spots around the development!
  21. Recently I've been revisiting some local Silurian outcrops. I have a love/hate relationship with these outcrops as they are incredibly difficult to work with, however I secretly enjoy that aspect as well. The fossils represent the Homerian stage just before the Mulde Event, so roughly 422 - 426mya (if I'm not mistaken). For whatever reason, in the Racine formation, Gravicalymene celebra are almost always complete in the molting position and other species usually found disarticulated. The trick is extracting them without destroying them. Sometimes they are found enrolled, though much less common. I have only found two enrolled from this location over the past few years. 1) enrolled Calymene 2) Gravicalymene celebra 3) " 4) " 5) " 6) Sphaerexochus romingeri 7) Pentamerid brachiopod 8) favosites blastoid? 9) Dalmanitid pygidium 10) partial Dalmanites cephalon Close up snaps Sphaerexochus romingeri I believe this is a crinoid cup judging by the shape, but not sure. If anyone has any ideas... and the drum roll... Three species on one plate, Encrinurus pygidium, Dalmanites cephalon and a Calymene on the bottom . Unfortunately, due to the nature of the rock and my lowly prep skills, the only survivor is the Dalmanites. I somehow managed to restore both eyes with the original pieces for a nice "eye-popping" specimen. Thanks for looking . Also, in case you're curious, this entire collection is the result of four trips, not one. About 4-5hours per trip , so about 18-20 hours of collecting. and many more prepping. Cheers
  22. Possible fossil ~ any ideas?

    Hello everyone! I hope the summer is treating everyone well. Here in Chicago it has been either great storms or brutal heat. I have had very little time or ability to get out but last week the weather evened out I got to do some exploring. I always head to areas where water has flooded and uncovered fresh places to look. Last week I found the item pictured below just siting on the surface. The shape caught my eye and it made me think of a nautilus-type shell. The ridges follow all around the surface of the "shell." This was found on the DuPage river about 25 miles West of Chicago. We are just in the edge of the Slurian area but just east of the Pennsylvanian region. When consulting online guides for Illinois, this looks like an incomplete endolobus shell. Any ideas? Thank you for your time and help!
  23. In the last two weeks i have found two new very promising fossil sites. They are on private land that i have permission to be on. And please don't ask where. There are so many things that i have to leave many behind. I hope i am lucky enough to find something truly amazing from these sites and share them with science and ultimately all of us. I believe this to be the first Orthacanthus sp. specimen ever found in this area of Illinois. It would be pretty neat to add this awesome predator to this fauna. As found: After prep: On the same trip i found a bone block associated with crinoids, a Metacoceras, a shark denticle, possible shark cartilage and what i believe are tetrapod bones. Please feel free and let me know what you guys think about the bones. A deep water environment with tetrapod material???? This strangely shaped bone has a thin outer layer on the "ornamental" end, almost like tooth enamel, but it's not thick enough. Continued..........
  24. Yesterday I was cracking open some concretions that I collected from the Braceville Shaft Mine (Essex Fauna) in 1999. I came across this little piece and posted it on my thread - "Sometimes You Have To Whack It". @Peat Burns replied that it looked like a tooth from a Cladodus type shark and I also agree that it looks like a shark tooth. In all my years and thousands of concretions from Mazon Creek, I have never seen anything like this. I would like to get other opinions on this or an exact ID. @fiddlehead , @RCFossils , @fossilized6s , @Rob Russell - what do you think?
  25. mazon creek help

    On my recent trip from Florida to Wisconsin I decided to bypass Chicago and head a little further west. In doing so, I realized I was coming very close to the Mazon Creek area. While I didn't have time to collect nodules there on my way north, I am planning to stop on my way back south towards the end of the month. At best I'll have 3 hours to collect ( as long a time as it takes for my wife to grow impatient and want to get moving again). So, since I am totally unfamiliar with the area, I am hoping someone who frequents the site could give me some pointers. I have read several posts about the site, and realize I am not hunting during the best time of year with all the vegetation at its prime, but being so close I just couldn't pass by again. Any suggestions re: making the most of my time there would be much appreciated. I am thinking I should collect nodules, rather than spending time splitting them, but i've also read only 40 % or so contain something...so suggestions as to that would also be appreciated. (Yes, I have lots of bug spray, mosquitos in Wisconsin have been huge this year,)
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