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  • Annelids
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  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 127 results

  1. Hey all, I was just wondering if there has ever been a study comparing fossils of the organisms trapped in amber to similarly located/aged "conventional" rock fossils. It would certainly be interesting to see how the organisms compare between the two forms of preservation- one as a flattened impression and the other looking like it was just alive yesterday.
  2. Bug ID request

    While this isn't the type of "bug" I normally collect, this one appealed to me as soon as I saw it on the auction site. Can anyone in our masses give me any help with regards to identification? The seller, who is also a member on here BTW, speculated at the order Neuroptera, but that was followed by a (?). It is Jurassic in age, from the Daohugou lagerstatte of Inner Mongolia. Thanks in advance.
  3. What do you all thing about this fossil insect? Real? Fake? Real with paint? It looks like Green River matrix, but I don't know. - edited to add 2 more pics--
  4. Fossil Wasp nest? ID verification

    Good morning folks. I have another puzzling fossil requiring identification/verification. This fossil came from the Tucson show in 2008 and was thought to be a fossil insect (wasp) nest. There were seven unlabeled fossils in the group I purchased. I have identified five of them but this is one I need your help with. Sounds like china when it's tapped with a spoon and appears to have a small section of fossil tree branch attached to it. Help!
  5. This middle Pennsylvanian concretion from Mazon Creek (Francis Creek Shale), was discovered in the fall of 2014 in the Mazon Creek Heritage Site. I could use some help identifying. The preservation is not the best. I see no indication of the existence of wings but I sense there were some.
  6. This middle Pennsylvanian concretion from Mazon Creek (Francis Creek Shale), was discovered in the fall of 2013 in the Mazon Creek Heritage Site. Whip Scorpion Phylum: Arthropoda Class: Arachnida Order: Uropygi Geralinura sp.
  7. Florissant Insects?

    I have been involved in a post "Florissant Fossil Quarry Fun". To make a long story short, I took the advice given to preserve my specimens from Florissant. Unfortunately some of my specimens had already broke. So I took out my razor blade and split them further. To my surprise, I think I found 2 insects!!! Your thoughts?
  8. hexapoda/mantoidae/Oise /Pseudomantoida

    New Paleogene mantises from the Oise amberand their evolutionary importance THOMAS SCHUBNEL and ANDRE NEL Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 64 (4): 779–786. schuNELinsemantilagersthexapoapp006282019.pdf @Coco @fifbrindacier
  9. Bug or no bug?

    I found this agate on a beach in Northern California. It appears to have a flying insect trapped inside of it. Is this even possible? Or is it an illusion? Who would I contact to find out for sure?
  10. Why I Love Blacklight!

    Whenever I bring home a new batch of fossils, I pull out my UV rock lamp. Why? Some fossils glow in the dark, but not in a uniform way. Variations in the mineral composition make for a variety of colors, even when the specimen seems fairly uniform in color in daylight. This can make small, hidden details really stand out. Case in point: This afternoon I was putting away some petrified wood I'd collected awhile back. I pulled out my black light to examine them because some of the wood from this site shows a rainbow of color under UV. This one particular piece was mostly orange under UV, though in camera the hues look different. What really got my attention, however, were a few really vibrant spots on one side. Insect traces! The petrified wood chip is only about 8 cm long. Even with a magnifier, some of the small details are hard to spot. I never would have spotted them in daylight, but they were super bright with the UV. Another box I was sorting through this week contained impressions of brachiopods and trilobites in plain, white limestone. It can be hard to see the contours in the matrix, but they show up much differently under the UV. Finally, UV light can be used to identify fossil mollusks whose patterns have bleached away. About 60% of fossil shells fluoresce and some species have been described based on the residual patterns made visible under ultraviolet light. Note: To photograph these, I used a Convoy UV LED flashlight. I set my camera on a tripod for a 4 second exposure at f/22, with ISO set to 1600. I had my DSLR's white balance set for daylight.
  11. Possible Insect wing from Carboniferous

    Hi all. I was wondering if I could get some sort of specific ID on a possible insect wing that I found in the roof shales of a thin coal that is dated to the Late Pennsylvanian or Kasimovian. Fossil plants and some vertebrate material can be found in the same shale. Stratigraphic information: From a roof shale of a thin coal roughly 30 feet below the Brush Creek Limestone of the Glenshaw Formation in the Conemaugh Group. Discovered in the suburbs outside of Pittsburgh.
  12. Fossils??

    Found Glen Rose TX area... this is very interesting to me. It has many different imprints. Could someone tell me if they are plants, insects, worms or all of the above I would really appreciate it
  13. New acquired Collection

    I have started to collect a few things from a older lady and wanted to share. The large piece of petrified wood is 8” across and 3” thick. The fish I have been wondering if they were the same kind? Love the bug/ mosquito or not sure what to call it. these were found 50+ years ago.
  14. Fossilized bee hive

  15. Is this an insect or fly?

    Hi I found this at walton on the naze in the uk around a week ago. If I remember rightly it was among the london clay. I thought it was wood so put it in my bag but After drying out and leaving for a few days I've noticed what looks like a fly or insect or maybe a fish scale? I'm not even sure if this piece is wood or bone or what? Any help much appreciated thank you.
  16. Insect Plant Fish or ...?

    Greetings, everyone. I spent the other day on the east side of Ventura County breaking open sedimentary rocks. I'm not experienced enough with that sort of material to positively ID it but I think it was siltstone. There was a leaf and something else on both sides of one of the rocks. I've been having a hard time figuring out what the "something else" is. It measures about 35 by 14 millimeters. I took a few pictures of both sides under different lighting conditions to help bring out some of the finer details. It comes from the Modelo Formation (Miocene). Thanks ahead of time for any help in figuring out what it is. Here are pictures of the first side: Some pictures of the second side:
  17. Burmite insect Identification

    Hi all Im looking for advice for resources for identifying Insect and plant inclusions in burmite, or similar aged amber. I am open to purchasing or using online resources. They originated in Hkamti and Tanai , Kachin, Burma.. Ive got about 25 pieces that Id love to work on, and my google-fu Has been been failing to turn up much, although I have some plans to do some more generic insect family studies. Ive got a usb microscope for taking close ups, and will eventually learn how to stack images for better quality. In case anyone's worrying the pieces passed the Electrostatic and saltwater tests. Please enjoy this picture of a neat little gastropod I found in one of the pieces Thank you all for your time.
  18. resinous exudate paleoentomology

    Description of a new species, Pintomyia dissimilis nov. sp., a phlebotomine fossil from Dominican Republic amber (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) José Dilermando Andrade Filho, Paula Cavalcante Lamy Serra e Meira, Cristiani de Castilho Sanguinette and Reginaldo Peçanha Brazil Parasites & Vectors Published: 14 May 2009 Parasites & Vectors 2009, 2:25 doi:10.1186/1756-3305-2-25 Received: 8 May 2009 Accepted: 14 May 2009 This article is available from: http://www.parasitesandvectors.com/content/2/1/25 © 2009 Filho et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. 1756-3305-2-25.pdf Those of us studying leishmaniasis might sit up and take notice
  19. Hello everyone, I'm new to this forum and fossil hunt. I found a fossil in Toronto area near a road construction site. It looks like some kind of insect. May I ask if someone could identify the ID of this fossil for me please? Thank you very much!
  20. Hello everyone, I have been getting very interested in collecting amber, mainly Baltic amber and am planning to expand the collection I already have, but I would like to know how I could protect/ preserve it as I feared that with time it will oxidize, craze or be damaged from other processes I may not know of. So does anyone know of what I could do to protect my amber? Any insight is appreciated, Thank you.
  21. I do not have a lot of experience buying insect fossils and was wondering if this ancestor to the modern dragonfly fossil is real?
  22. This was in a collection of decorative eggs from my grandfather. What do you guys think of it, is it genuine?
  23. This was purchased in Colorado, about an hour away from Florissant which is known for insect fossils. It's about 10 mm long. What do you guys think? Real, fake, a mix of both? Thanks!
  24. Oviatt Creek Idaho

    Hi all, I am curious if anyone here has any experience at the Oviatt Creek Fossil Beds outside of Moscow, Idaho. I did not find any information on the Fossil Forum and an internet search turned up a only a few papers and more questions than answers. The composition of this area may be similar to the more famous Clarkia fossil beds. It seems that the Oviatt Creek beds used to belong to the United States Forest Service, but may have been turned over to the Potlach Timber company. Has this impacted recreational, non-vertebrate hounding? A call to the local Forest Service Ranger Station may be in order if no one here has any insight. Thanks!
  25. Arachnid? in Burmese amber

    Hi guys and gal, I recently bought some burmese amber pieces online. When I looked through this particular piece, I was amazed at the inclusion within it. It looks like a spider or tick, or some type of arachnid, however I am no entomologist. I was wondering if one of The Fossil Forum’s members could help me id this mysterious little critter. The specimen come from northern Myanmar/Burma and is about 99 million years old from the middle Cretaceous period. I have never seen an insect like this. It is quite squared in shape. It is a small insect around 3-4 mm. Through a 10x lense Abdomen focused through a 40x microscope What looks like fangs (such as those in arachnids) in a 100x microscope
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