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  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 59 results

  1. Hello everyone, These were all found in St. Claire, PA. Mahantango Formation. Anybody know what these are? #1. Looks like octopus suckers in brown outline. Is it a coral? #2. Crinoid star stems? #3. Cylindrical molds, what are these?
  2. Crockett/Stone City unknowns

    Hello all! I made my first trip to the famous Eocene Texas location a few weeks ago and have a few things that remain a mystery to me. I have perused the forum and was able to ID most of my finds from jkfoam's informative replies and many topics from other members. However, several of the gastropods below resemble species I have already identified, but they're not quite the same, so I'm unsure exactly what they are. Not all the images have a scale, but they are all micro fossils under half a centimeter in length. Thank you in advance for any help you can offer! (1) I know this is an ootolith, but I cannot differentiate between the two most common kinds. Help would be appreciated, especially as I only have two of these guys and they are the same. (2) Initially I believed this to be an ootolith as well, but after cleaning it, I really have no idea. Image is front & back. (3) Here is another that I believed to be an ootolith but now have doubts about. Image is front & back. (4) This appears very crab-esque to me, but again, I have no idea. (5) Could this be Bolis enterogramma? I can't find enough images on the web to say I am confident with my ID on this one. (6) I have this (and many others) down as Polinices sp., however I cannot tell the difference between these and Neverita sp. so the ID could be incorrect. Could someone clarify the differences for me? (7) Mystery gastropod (two views; same specimen). (8) Another similar mystery gastropod (two views; same specimen). (9) This is one that looks similar to some I've already IDed, but just different enough to make me believe it is something else. (10) I believe these two are the same species, but when they get this small (some of my smallest; only a few millimeters long), I find it difficult to tell. For all I know, these could be ice cream cones.
  3. France pyrite ammonite id

    I was given this ammonite from France as a gift,a small part is gone outside.Does anyone know what species or age this is? Sorry but I dont have the formations and age. Also a short question,if I put it in a bag would it prevent pyrite disease?
  4. HI. Folks! I'm going nutz behind my mask--and I have a trip to Miss. and Ala. scheduled.... never been to either state, and wondered if anyone can suggest areas for a legal hunt or two while I'm there? I'd appreciate any tips, particularly with specific directions. Thanks! Barby
  5. paleozoic malacology

    DBNA Middle and Upper Devonian Cryptodonta (Bivalvia)from the Pelagic Hercynian Facies -Taxonomy, Stratigraphy, and Paleoecology Judith Nagel Inaugural dissertation,2006 ABOUT 5,8 MB the research areas on a Devonian geodynamic reconstruction :
  6. Hey everyone! I have a couple recent finds that I would appreciate your input on. I’m currently unsure of the formation that these fossils come from. I found this outcrop underneath a parking lot. It’s orange conglomeratic sandstones which makes me think Hookton Formation which would place it somewhere around 450,000 ybp. Scale is in inches.
  7. Help request! I am putting together a tool for judging rock age based on very crude, whole-rock, hand-sample observations of fossil faunas/floras -- the types of observations a child or beginner could successfully make. I view this as a complement to the very fine, species-level identifications commonly employed as index fossils for individual stages, biozones, etc. Attached is what I've got so far, but I can clearly use help with corals, mollusks, plants, vertebrates, ichnofossils, and the post-Paleozoic In the attached file, vibrant orange indicates times in earth history to commonly observe the item of interest; paler orange indicates times in earth history to less commonly observe the item of interest. White indicates very little to no practical probability of observing the item of interest. Please keep in mind that the listed indicators are things like “conspicuous horn corals,” purposefully declining to address rare encounters with groups of low preservation potential, low recognizability, etc. Got additions/amendments, especially for the groups mentioned above? Toss them in the comments below! Thank you..... https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1tVm_u6v573V4NACrdebb_1OsBEAz60dS1m4pCTckgyA
  8. Hi All. I was unsure where to put this message so hopefully this place is okay. I teach 7th grade Life Science and we are soon starting our coverage of major animal types (arthropods, echinoderms, molluscs, chordtates, etc). I am hoping to put together a teaching collection that can be used each year as we do this. If there are members here who are willing to donate any/all types of durable specimens (harder for young teens to destroy) that could be used to teach students the key features of these phyla. If you are willing and able to share can you please PM me directly. I do appreciate it :-)
  9. I recently saw a wonderful diagram showing the fossil ranges of various scleractinian coral architectures, or at least the ranges of genera typical of those architectures. But now I can't seems to find it again... The diagram included images of the various coral growth forms and was simpler than but otherwise similar to this: If anyone knows where I might have seen such a diagram, please post the url here -- thanks!
  10. Dear FFers: I’ll be in Bakersfield for the week before Christmas, spending some time looking for shark teeth on the hill and doing some research and reporting for Fossil News magazine. I was wondering whether anyone would be willing to share me any information about publicly accessible invert sites within an hour or so of there. I have a vague memory of reading that there were some road cuts with freshwater and marine mollusks, but I’ve no specific information. I was also wondering whether it was still possible to get permission from Chevron to visit the Kettleman Hills site. Does anyone know? I’d be up for a collecting buddy, too, if anyone’s available during that busy week! Wendell
  11. Here is a thread to share some of your rarest partials that if whole would've been incredible specimens, but you know how it is sometimes... Yet they still amazing to own a piece of. I will start off by sharing a piece of the tail of a Probolichas Kristiae, an incredibly unique looking rare lichid trilobite from Oklahoma that would've of been incredible if whole of course yet this piece still has amazing detail and I am more that happy to own
  12. Any idea of the type of this marine invertebrate ? Most probably marine worms and Pleistocenic but any sugestion welcome.
  13. Hi everyone, I haven't been able to post much lately as I've been ill for a few months so haven't been getting out hunting as much as I'd like but I've had some good luck when I have been able to get out so wanted to share some finds! All are from the Carboniferous of the Midland Valley of Scotland from several formations, I haven't gotten round to photographing everything yet so I'll post some more stuff over the next few days. First some finds from the Lower Carboniferous/Mississippian marine Blackhall Limestone. Undescribed jellyfish, Fife Coast, 3cm across. Apparently a paper describing these is about to be published very soon. I'm told this ones a male, the bumps in the center being the male reproductive organs. This is by far the more common form, there is a second spotty form known from this formation which I found a specimen of a few weeks back and will post shortly.
  14. Florida Fossil Shells

    I don't know where to begin. I am completely new to the forum. I will eventually be posting some fossils for help with ID and others that are identified by experts already. Having said that, this poster represents some of my fossils. I am not sure if can even read the names underneath. I may have to post separately. Any ID corrections would be graciously accepted. What I really need help with is locations. While living in FL for several years, I would go to a couple of locations in Polk Co. where I knew road base, I believe it is called aggregates were often kept. I visited and collected. What I don't know if where the shells originated. APAC Pit in Sarasota, Aggregates Pit in Bonita Springs, Star Ranch Quarry, Clewiston, Cochran Pit in Labelle to name a few possible locations. Based on the shells collected, it would seem that most come from either the Tiamiami or Caloosahatchee Formations, not sure which members....Pinecrest Beds, Bermont, Ayers Landing Ft. Denaud etc. How do I know what collection data to include on my label. I can list where I found it, but it is not its origin. ID is pretty ok with Petuch's works, but if I don't know the origin, it makes ID much more difficult. Any input or ideas to help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance. I have included a sample collection label for anyone to comment on how to improve. One is more vague since I don't know origin, the other is from a fossil I purchased. Date on label was date I added to my collection. How important is it to list the taxonomist such as Petuch or Conrad etc? scienceteacher79
  15. Weird fossil - what's dis den?

    Hello! I found this on the beach today. It's a great site for Belemnites, bivalves and the occasional Ammonite. The beach here is at the head of an estuary which enjoys big tidal surges. So many of the fossils have been washed along the coast from well known Jurassic sites like Whitby. They're usually ocean polished and removed from any cortex by the sea. So this little guy is about and Inch and half long. It looks like a lobster claw, but surely a fossil lobster claw wouldn't be this well preserved? It's definitely stone and gives a lovely "" noise when tapped against another stone. Any advice from you lovely people would be amazing
  16. It's been a few years of hunting for me now. What began as a spontaneous trip to North Sulphur River, spurred by childhood nostalgia, has become something of a gnawing beast that constantly nibbles at the corner of my consciousness. What will the weather be like this weekend? When will I have another three-day break? Is the car road-trip ready? Do I have the right foot ware for the locale? Is that unprepped fossil an ammonite or a nautilus? When will I finally find my first mosasaur tooth? And on and on... I've often wondered if this is a pre-midlife crisis. The time I get to spend outside is usually enjoyable, even when the weather is inhospitable. Is it madness that I am picking up ammonites at Lake Texoma among rocks covered in icicles? Possibly. Why worry about freezing cold water creeping over the tops over your boots when there is a beautiful vertebra with an ebony patina sitting in the gravel bar across the channel? I've hunted the well known sites up until now. North Sulphur River, Whiskey Bridge, Post Oak Creek. I have still much to learn about these places and the fossilized remains found there. But alas the gnawing beast isn't satisfied with only a handful of locations, regardless of their charm and ability to still surprise. So with a few carefully coordinated research tools, new sites began to slowly appear on my radar. I'm gettin' around. Considering this was one of my first scouting missions, this trip was pretty productive. The finds below are all from Bosque County, and likely came from several units: Comanche Peak, Edwards, and Fort Worth. All Cretaceous. Urchins, clams, gastropod steinkerns, oysters, prints. Let me know what you think. Until the gnawing starts again, ladies and gentlemen...
  17. Hey guys! I actually missed a week of uploading, but Cris and I got back at it and went to one of our new creek sites for some more exploration! Unfortunately, we gave it a good go and didn't find anything great. So we literally went after dark to some of our trusty old road sites where fill material is used as road fill. This turned out to be an absolutely amazing decision, and ended up being one of our best hunts on the roads to date! This video is chock-full of weirdness, and great finds! Give it a watch when you get some time
  18. Matoaka Beach 11/07/18

    Hi all, I finally made the trek to Matoaka Beach, a fossil collecting site along the Calvert Cliffs on the Western Shore of the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland. The beach is accessible to the public for $5 per person per day. Once we arrived, we reported to the front office where the property owner and his adorable newborn daughter were happy to collect our fee and give us access to the beach along with advice on how to best hunt the grounds. He advised us to head North (left of the entrance), which was what I had also read online. Apparently, the farther North you head, the better the fossils tend to be. So my dad and I made our way down the stairs to the foot of the cliffs, and began searching. The beach is very wide, so it's difficult to decide where to walk. I was finding fragments of Chesapectan shells left and right, but nothing quite worth keeping. But then, after maybe 5 minutes of hunting, I looked down at my feet and saw a large, complete, Ecphora staring back at me. I could hardly believe it. At a site where invertebrates dominate the matrix, a nice Ecphora is just about equivalent to finding a Megalodon tooth. And yes, I am aware that Meg teeth can be and have been found at this site before, but the find that I was after that day was certainly Ecphora. It was a gorgeous specimen, much larger and more complete than any other I'd found before. And there it was, just laying out in the open, a couple hundred yards from the entrance. I excitedly showed my dad the find, and promptly continued hunting, although I knew there was likely no beating what I had just found at the very beginning of the day. As I walked farther North, I marveled at the cliffs, which were absolutely chalk full of invertebrate fossils. It was incredible, and unlike anything I'd ever seen before. I kept finding crushed shells and small pieces of fossilized coral, but nothing spectacular. That is, until I stumbled upon the section of the beach where many huge chunks of the cliffs had fallen. I decided to look for large shells sticking out of the cliff falls, and very quickly discovered the best method for finding fossils at Matoaka. Immediately, I began finding giant Chesapectan every couple of inches in the cliff falls. After unearthing about a dozen, I decided to head North again to see if I could find another similar section. I walked at least a mile farther and found next to nothing, so I turned around and headed back towards the digging site. When I arrived, I saw that my dad has discovered the falls and was digging through them just as I had been. We both set down our gear and decided to spend the rest of our day there carefully excavating shells from the matrix. This was certainly different than the fossil hunting I've done in the past. It felt more like the traditional "dig site" hunting that most people think of when they think of a paleontologist or archaeologist. It was really cool. At one point, I saw a familiar spiral structure just poking out of one of the falls, and quickly recognized it as a small Ecphora. I plopped myself down on the ground next to it and spent the next 20 or so minutes cautiously excavating it. I foolishly forgot to bring a digging kit, so I resourcefully used broken fragments of sturdy shells around me to dig out the specimen. Although I chipped off a few pieces of it, I managed to extract it from the matrix mostly intact. With that, we headed back towards the entrance. We decided to sift for a bit to try for some shark teeth, and eventually I found one and my dad found three. Matoaka is unrivaled for invertebrate fossils along the Cliffs, but it's definitely not a top spot for teeth. Overall, I was incredibly pleased with my first trip to Matoaka Beach. From the friendly owners to the beautiful scenery and wildlife and the fantastic fossil finds, Matoaka Beach is a must for any fossil hunter in the DMV area. We ended up finding a ton of Chesapectan, ranging from "itty bitty" nearly the size of my hand, some stunning Ecphora, fossilized coral and barnacles, some Turritella, and a few shark teeth as well. I already can't wait to go back to Matoaka. Thanks for reading my report. Hoppe Hunting!
  19. Dear Canadian Fossil Collectors, Some of you may have heard that the ROM is finally going to open an invertebrate gallery, something that has been sadly missing for many years. There was a recent announcement of a $5 million (Canadian I assume) donation for this project. https://www.rom.on.ca/en/about-us/newsroom/press-releases/royal-ontario-museum-receives-landmark-5-million-gift-to-establish This is a great move on the part of the ROM. Jean-Bernard Caron has contacted me regarding the new exhibition. We have communicated both by email and phone. It seems that they are in desperate need of "spectacular" Ontario specimen for the exhibit. They probably contacted me because of my web site and in general people are aware of my "Ontario" collection, both Arkona and Brechin. It is very unfortunate that they (ROM) have no relationship with Canadian collectors or any other collectors for that matter. Jean and I spoke about this problem at length because at this point no one is willing to donate anything. We spoke about my Brechin crinoid collection and how it is going to an American institution simply because someone at the ROM told me that there was no one at the ROM interested and I should find someone somewhere else. We also spoke of a Arkona crinoid collection I personally gave them over 30 years ago and how it is still sitting in the same boxes under a table. No one bothered to accession it. And finally we spoke of a recent find by a Canadian collector of a very rare fish from Arkona. An American wanted to work on it, had no problem with it being deposited at the ROM and even made arrangements for the ROM to contact the collector. The collector sat at his phone for weeks waiting for the ROM to call. The specimen ended up being donated to an American Institution. I made it very clear to Jean that his problem is the historic relationship with the collecting public and more importantly the total lack of interest in working on ONTARIO projects. For being called the "Royal Ontario" all of the work is outside of Ontario. Jean has recognized this as a problem and is willing to work on repairing the relationship and maybe getting some Ontario projects going. I think that Jean is sincere in his statements and would really like a better relationship with the collecting public. I have agreed to donate some specimens but I am not going to fill the entire "Ontario" exhibit. The purpose of this post is to encourage Canadians, and other collectors to contact Dr. Caron and to start a relationship with the museum. And of course he is looking for Canadians to make donations to the exhibit. What exactly he needs is a very open question. I personally will be visiting sometime in the new year to see exactly what is needed and go from there. Maybe you can do the same. His contact information is below. Dr. Jean-Bernard Caron Richard M. Ivey Curator of Invertebrate Palaeontology Department of Natural History Royal Ontario Museum 100 Queen's Park Toronto, Ontario, M5S 2C6 CANADA Tel: 416-586-5593#1 Fax: 416-586-5553 E-mail: jcaron@rom.on.ca<mailto:jcaron@rom.on.ca>
  20. Hello, I have been a long time member of the fossil forum, but I have never posted before. I live in south Florida and I am planning on making a trip up to northwestern Georgia, northeastern Alabama, and southeastern Tennessee for two or three days and I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions on fossil hunting sites in the region. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated.
  21. Id those please.

    Hi everyone, i have those two from eocene marl layers, can you identify them ?
  22. Hi Everyone, I suddenly have a work trip to the Black Hills of South Dakota coming up next week and I'd like to get out and collect some fossils along the way. I'm driving from Denver to Lead, SD and will be driving north on HW 85 and 18 through Newcastle. I'd be really happy to get a few stops in along the way and any potential information would really be great. Unfortunately, I won't have a ton of time to be able to stop and really dig, so some road cuts or target formations would be super helpful for surface collecting. I'm open to every type of fossil. I know there's a lot of fossils in that section of the state so I'm looking forward to hopefully finding some decent stuff! Thanks! Caleb
  23. Maastrichtian asteroids

    Recommended,and then some Gapalbed13.pdf As usual with this journal, excellent paleobiological information & documentation. There has been a post regarding Moroccan an asteroid accumulation possibly being fake,but at the moment I can't find it.
  24. Crown Point Formation

    Recently, I have obtained a Wikipedia account so that I could update articles on some of Vermont’s geologic formations. The first of which I have made is the Ordovician age Crown Point Formation, in which I have collected many rocks completely covered in fossil invertebrates. Although I am unsure as to how far this formation goes (possibly extending into New York as well),localities known for having some of the most fossils from the formation include the towns of Panton and Isle La Motte. In creating the list, my main source of information was Paleontology of the Lake Champlain Basin in Vermont, as well as my own observations of what fossils were collected by myself and other members of the Burlington Gem & Mineral Club when we collected specimens from private quarries in Panton, VT last October. However, as my main source was written in 1962, the names and classification for some of the fauna included in the list may have names that are dubious, and the list itself if subject to change. If there is any further information that should be added to the article, please let me know, or edit the page responsibly (basing your facts/information with resources). Note: I have not added algae & porifera yet, so this post (and the Wikipedia article) will be edited. The Crown Point Formation Cephalopods Maclurites magnus Stereospyroceras champlainensis Vaginoceras oppletum Vaningenoceras sp. Proteoceras perkinsi Proteoceras pulchrum Plectoceras jason Nanno sp. Trilobites Bumastus erautusi Bumastus globosus Cryptolithus tesselatus Eoharpes antiquatus Flexicalymene senaria Isotelus gigas Pliomerops canadensis Vogdesia bearsi Echinoderms Dendrinocrinus alternatus Brachipods Atleasma multicostum Camerella varians Macrocoelia champlainensis Corals Streptelasma expansum Foerstephyllum wissleri Lambeophyllum profundum Bryozoans Praspora orientalis Rhinidictya fenestrata Stictopora ramosa
  25. Kentucky invertebrates

    Couple of fossils found in the fort Knox region. Not too impressive but pretty cool none the less. Let know what you think.
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