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Found 345 results

  1. Fossil I saw???

    I saw a fossil jaw bone segment and teeth when I was in The Calvert Cliff area recently. Another hunter found a very dark colored section of jawbone about 4 or so inches long. It had a good 6-8 teeth in it (same dark color). He was claiming he had found an alligator/crocodile jaw section but it had thorn-sharp teeth. Not what I would have expected to come from a gator or crocodile. I wish now that I took a picture of it but I did not. The only other thing I can remember is that the teeth seemed various sizes, from memory. And were likely all on the side of the mouth where our pre-molars and molars would be. The front of the jaw was missing. I was just wondering what else might leave a jaw section like that. Thanks! Andy
  2. NSR Jackpot(ish)

    I finally convinced myself to head out to the North Sulphur River again. After 2 attempts of coming up empty handed I was having trouble convincing myself that it was worth the 4 hour round trip excursion. Knowing the date for damming up the river looms nearer and nearer I decided to brave the cold water. I'm glad I did. This time with some help and guidance from a friend my trip was much more eventful. Having NEVER found a Mosasaur vertebrae my trip was made just 10 minutes in when a beautiful Mosasaur vertebrae was just sitting right there on the surface. Already a massive success in my book. A little ways down the creek my friend begins to tell me how he has found 2 Mosasaur premaxes in this spot throughout the year. I replied, "Dude, I would lose my mind if I found a piece of Mosasaur jaw!" No joke, less than 1 minute later we turn a corner and I notice something barely sticking out of the shale and mud at the bottom of the creek. I pick it up, turn it over and staring back at me is a tooth socket! Needless to say, true to my word, I did indeed lose my mind! Apparently my excitement and loud noises I made scared off all the other fossils as I didn't find much else for the next several hours. Still this was by far my best and most exciting fossil hunt. Totally worth getting stuck and sucked up into knee deep mud for.
  3. Unidentified Jaw, Mammal?

    Hello everyone. Ive got a tough one for you guys. So I have a fossil jaw with a single canine tooth that I’ve had in my collection for a couple years. It was a gift from my boyfriend, so no locality. I tried to have it identified on the fossil forum Facebook group when I first got it, but no one knew what it was for sure. I had a paleontologist post a response and this is what he had to say: ”Hi Marielle Krenzelak, I'm a palaeontologist but I'm not entirely sure what you have there. I'm not concerned with the material that others don't think is bone. It looks to me like the canine tooth (the only tooth you have) is broken. I think the jaw is mammalian based on its overall morphology. I don't think that it is a horse, based on the shape of the symphysis (area where the left and right jaws would have connected) and its position relative to the canine. It is interesting that it has a long post-canine diastema (the smooth area after the canine and before the alveoli, or holes, where the next teeth would have gone). I also think the other suggestions (boar and goat) are also incorrect, again based on the length of the diastema and the shape of the symphysis. Finally, the age constraint someone gave you of less than 20,000 years is not supportable. I've worked on mammals back to ~ 55,000,000 years that have similar preservation. Barring that, I'm just not sure what it is you have there.” So I thought I’d try again on this forum to see if anyone has any idea what it might be? I know we have many experts and actual paleontologists on here. If anyone could help me out, it would be greatly appreciated. Here is a link to the post about it on Facebook in case anyone is in the fossil forum Facebook group and wants to take a look at it: https://www.facebook.com/groups/135008766530423/permalink/1768488489849101?sfns=mo Thank you for any thoughts or insights you have to share!
  4. Edmontosaurus jaw

    Hello! I see these edmontosaurus jaws. Edmontosaurus jaw are common? What do you think? Are they good ones or not? Thank you so much. jaw 1
  5. Spinosaur jaw section?

    Does this look like a spinosaurus jaw section? The tooth looks legit from what I can see, but the jaw bone looks strange for an apparent Kem Kem fossil. Is that trench along the tooth line, in the top view, a spino feature?
  6. Repair jaw tooth?

    I finished prepping this Enchodus jaw section last year but was undecided about repairing/replacing the tip of the tooth. Comments/suggestions?
  7. Jaw mammal

    Hi Whats jaw is animal it? Location :Tyniec, Southern Poland
  8. Ichthyosaur Jaw

    Hi just putting this in as a placeholder. Found today at Penarth, South Wales, UK. An ichthyosaur jaw with some other bones. It’s in a shelly limestone which is hard to prep but fingers crossed.
  9. Another trip to the Catskill formation and more fish. This time it was new sites on Rt 6 in Pennsylvania and some of the sites visited before. During the Middle Devonian, the Acadian orogeny had uplifted the edge of the tectonic plate and created a very high mountain range to the east over New England and down the east coast (ref1). These mountains eroded rapidly and much of that sediment was carried west toward the inland sea that covered PA and NY. The Catskill delta shoreline raced westward across the northern part of Pennsylvania in the Middle to Late Devonian. Marine sediments were replaced by near shore fresh water and then flood plain deposits. The Catskill represents this deposition and in this environment the first tetrapods evolved in a very diverse and complex ecosystem. So it's interesting to examine the spatial and temporal relationship of the deposits. Most of the work so far has been done at Red Hill and along Rt 15. So I had read about a Tristichopterid jaw that was found in the road cut along Rt 6 at Wyalusing Rocks and wanted to take a look. That site was a little disappointing but another road cut east of there in Laceyville, PA produced this interesting and almost complete but poorly preserved jaw. And after some reconstruction. The plates above the jaw appear to be some kind of head plates but because of the poor preservation I have yet to see any ornament. There are teeth in there and I will attempt to expose them when I get to my new house in Connecticut. and the counter-part More to come
  10. Mammal Jaw? (Location unknown)

    Hi all, First time using the forum. I got this from a local rock and mineral show years back, but they gave me no information other than that it was a “prehistoric deer.” Using this, I did some research, and highly suspect that it could be the jaw of a Leptomeryx species (which would put it somewhere in N. America?). It definitely resembles the pictures I’ve seen. Any and all help would be greatly appreciated.
  11. I have a specimen of a shark jaw that I am unable to identify. From a quick search, it seems that it might be a snaggletooth shark jaw, but I am not completely sure.
  12. I can’t figure out if these are 2 associated jaw pieces. In most pictures they sure look it, but some pictures make me second guess it, and if they aren’t, they’re definitely still the attaching pieces, even if from different animals. I was looking at it backwards for awhile, which set me back, but I figured out the thicker part is actually the front of the jaw, right before the curve, or right after it starts, if it’s been glued on at the incorrect angle, which I think could also be possible. the 1st picture looks very strange because of how that smaller section suddenly drops down and gets taller, and especially strange after researching and finding out that it’s supposed to get wider there, but actually SHORTER. the 2nd picture looks good, except it MIGHT supposed to start slightly curving inward at the point of reattachment pics 1,3,4,6,&7 all make it look like they rent supposed to be associated together, but the other pics make it look very accurate. I don’t know what to think, so I thought I’d see what people with much better knowledge than I, think about it.
  13. Basilosaur lower frontal jaw section

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Basilosaur(us?) frontal lower jaw seyction, from Boujdour, in Morocco. Hopefully the species can be distinguished with some more info
  14. Basilosaur frontal lower jaw section

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Almost the entire frontal canine portion of the lower jaw of a Basilosaur. As you can see, the area where the absent front canines were, at the tip of the piece is visible, as well as where the missing last canines were situated. Although it was labeled as a Basilosaurus, I’m a little hesitant to consider that the case until I can personally corroborate the information. Apparently from Boujdour, I’m just having trouble finding information about which whales are, or are not found there, so until then I’ll leave it more open with just Basilosaur.
  15. Bone Identification - Botswana Skull

    Hi everyone, Can you help me identify what animal this may be? It was found in Botswana. It is a semi-arid climate. Any idea if it's carnivorous or not? Any clues are helpful! Thanks.
  16. Good day everyone, I'm looking into these two partial mammal skulls: An oreodont Merycoidodon and a Camel Poebrotherium. I'd like some help to find out if these are all real or have been partially fabricated, enhanced, composited, total fakes. Photos 1-4: Merycoidodon culbertsoni Oligocene Nebraska Photos 5-8: Camel Poebrotherium labiatum Brule Formation Oligocene-Whiteriverian Converse County, Wyoming
  17. Mosasauroid Jaw

    Hi guys, I have recently acquired this Mosasauroid partial jaw. Seller claimed it is a juvenile Mosasaur. He acknowledged that some of the teeth may have been reattached. But he didnt know which, he got it from his supplier like this. And upon further questioning, he also admited that he is not absolutely sure about the genus. He speculated juvenile Mosasaur due to its size, but i dont think a smaller genus of Mosasaur, like Halisaurus, Tethysaurus or Platecarpus, is out of the picture. Please help me identify the genus of this Mosasuroid and the location of this jaw (dentary or mandible, left or right). If you would be so kind, please also point out to me, which teeth are wrongly attached, or maybe, composite. (The 3 red arrows are the teeth that felt quite real) Thanks. Edit: Almost forgot, seller claimed it came from a Phosphate deposit at Khourigba, Morocco.
  18. L.S., Since animal fossils are definitely not my strongsuit, I would like to call upon the incredible collective knowledge here at TFF and ask your help with the identification of the fish remains shown below. This specimen comes from the Westphalian D (Pennsylvanian, Carboniferous) of the Piesberg quarry near Wallenhorst, Germany. The shape of the scales reminds me of images of rhizodont (?) fish scales, but this could very well be a superficial resemblance only... Penny for your thoughts? Kind regards, Tim
  19. Possible theropod jaw fragment?

    Hi is this a Theropod jaw fragment from the belly river group Canada?
  20. Top view of previous jaw piece

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Top view under lighting that pronounces depth better
  21. Mosasaur jaw section

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    5 toothed (3 present) length of large sized mosasaur jaw. Various fossils and fish vertebrae on rear. *more info coming
  22. Cetus(pappo?) top view

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Top view of previous piece
  23. Cetus(pappo?) rear view

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Rear angle of previous piece
  24. Basilosaurus rear jaw with molars

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    About 8" side to side *info to be added
  25. Woolly Rhinocéros teeth or...?

    hello folks, I recently acquired a series of 3 teeth identified by the dealer as belonging to Coelondonta antiquitatis (woolly rhino) from 'Russia' (whatever that means). The teeth are certainly from the rhino family (that's as close as I can personally get), but these particular teeth are huge, t least twice the size of any other woolly rhino (or Teleoceras sp. ) teeth that I have (sample size about 20), or any scaled photos of woolly rhino teeth and jaws with teeth that I've found online (note: lots of photos available online, few with scale, alas). I've include two photos below showing the teeth, and a tape measure for scale. Two additional photos follow that include a woolly rhino jaw with teeth and a separate tooth for comparison to these three It got me wondering if these aren't from a woolly rhino but another member of the family?. In scanning the Asiatic rhino family tree, Elasmotherium sp. (Pleistocene) and Paraceratherium sp. (Oligocene) are the only two that exhibit a notable size difference from ol' Woolly. Unfortunately, there are maddeningly few images of teeth or jaws from these two animals, and nothing with scale that I can find. Thoughts? Any references to recommend? thanks in advance!
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