Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'jellyfish'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 29 results

  1. Day Two ; Locality Two (or Seven if you include Day One) Prepping and Retail, Erfoud, Morocco. 20th February 2019 Erfoud town itself is famous for its beautiful fossils, its skilled fossil preppers and also for its wide variety of fakes, composites, good and bad repair jobs and utter frankenfossils. A large percentage of fossils from Morocco that are available in shops and on the internet the world over originate from here or pass through the place. Fossils are sent here for prepping from all over the south and then sent from here everywhere in the country and abroad. There are many little shops, prepping centres with huge attached shops and 'museums which are really pretty much just shops as well. Top Tip :The prices here are about ten times the price of the prices in the little shacks on the edge of town or elsewhere in Morocco, but haggling can reduce the cost significantly. Many places have 'fixed' prices, but they're actually always negotiable. This time, we went to the one my friend Anouar, who is a tour guide, takes his tourists and I was asked politely not to accuse the owners and chap who'd show us around and do the chat, of having fakes or wrong info, so i had to bite my lip. We asked if it was okay to take photos and they said yes, which I was surprised about, but I guess it was because Anouar was going to use photos for his own purposes and this would involve advertising the shop. Top Tip : You will see a lot of fixed prices in Moroccan Dirham in the pieces and shelves. Divide by ten to have a price in US dollars. Because we were with Anouar, we were told everything is 50% of the marked price, but I suspect they often do this anyway, "Special Berber prices, today only". I've heard that before. And you can still haggle to get something way under that 50% and you just know they'll still be making a good profit. I didn't buy anything. Little local stores are more my line anyway - I rarely shop in supermarkets. Here is the entrance where you can see huge plates ready for prepping and polishing, some have been cut into pieces and they glued back together it seems to me, I know this happens with the crinoid beds, so i guess it's true of the orthocerid and goniatite stuff too. Some just look cobbled together because of the circular saw marks when cutting out upper layers.With these, polishing will remove the grid lines. These sheets are from the local area and contain the goniatites and orthoconic nautiloids we were walking on earlier, but from a better quality, less eroded and distorted source. Famennian, Upper Devonian, I think. This photo shows one of the trenches they dig to reach the best quality material, similar to the ones i was walking along earlier this day : Below, somebody walking on the slabs and some maps of the the world at different times in it's past, showing continental drift. : Notice these are not the famous black orthocerid marbles that come from elsewhere. The picture of Spinosaurus is a bit misleading, as you all know, it's not found in these marbles or in the Erfoud area. In fact there is very little Kem Kem material available here these days, though there was in the past. I suspect the Kem Kem area probably has it's own facillities nowadays.
  2. Keichousaurus with Jellyfish?

    On this plate is a Keichousaurus and an unknown fossil. You can see there is something at the left hand corner, does it look like a jellyfish?
  3. Good morning everybody, For anyone interested! Mid January 2019 I’ll publish a new book (in Italian, the english version is planned in 2020, but only if I'll recover the printing and translator costs) ‘Spiagge Cambriane. Meduse e tappeti algali’ [Cambrian shorelines - Jellyfish and Algal mats]. It concerns fossil jellyfish (and cnidarian in general) and their relation with algal mats, as a principal factor of the taphonomy of these soft-bodied organisms, covering fossils lagerstätten from Precambrian to the French Oligocene. The 232 pages book is rich of inedit illustrations coming from worldwide private and public collections, wonderful dioramas and includes a nice poster resuming the paleogeography and sites where these fossils come from. The first print will be limited (250 copies). Have a sneak preview (introduction, table of contents, bibliography and index) here: https://tinyurl.com/ybh8zb3t Do not hesitate to reserve your copy in time (but without engagement). If interested, please contact me with a message. Enrico
  4. watchamacalit?

    think i had put this on here before but the pics were bad and it was with a group... took a few new pics and found a similar item posted way back in 2014 I think also in texas... could this be a similar item? but in perhaps poorer condition. this is the post:.....
  5. Jellyfish?

    Supposed to be from the Cretaceous, found in Mota del Cuevo (Spain). I think it may be a jellyfish... on a shell... Note the soft-looking round brownish double structure on the center. Between the two structures it looks transparent white. Underneath there is a shell. On top there is a stick-structure with another round structure of a different kind I think. What is it? Thank you!
  6. I have a lot of unopened Mazon Creek concretions and though I do put some out in the winter for the Freeze / Thaw process, the vast majority, especially the larger ones do not open. So to dwindle my concretions, I have no problem whacking them with a hammer, and that is what I was doing today. As we all know, this is not the best way to do it since it can damage a nice specimen, but I take my chances. I always picked up any concretion that looked promising and never passed up larger ones. This all depends on the are that you are collecting, concretions from Pit 11 are never super large, but Pit 4 always produced larger ones - see below. Though these are large, they are by no means my largest. The vast majority of the time there is nothing inside, like the one below. Other ones produce something nice, like this Alethopteris that I cracked open today. Cleaned up_ A couple of my other finds from today, nothing spectacular, but is nice to get rid of the dud ones. Neuropteris Annularia Annularia, Neuropteris and Bark Asterophyllites Bark Essexella asherae Jellyfish
  7. Jellyfish fossil?

    I discovered this specimen by chance a few years before I got into fossil hunting. I was on a vacation at Oak Island, North Carolina when I found it. I am thinking it is a Jellyfish fossil.
  8. Jellyfish?

    Unfortunately I don’t have much useful detail to share with you here. I found this in Illinois at the bottom of a bridge filled with slabs of rock blasted from God-knows-what quarry. It other slabs like it contained fragments of brachiopod shells and calymene trilobites. It is about 4 1/2cm in diameter. My best guess was a jellyfish or something similar; a geologist whom I showed it to agreed, but honestly neither of us were at all confident in our assessment. Thoughts?
  9. Mazon Help - Number six: jellyfish

    Probably Essexella asherae, but wishing it were Lascoa Mesostaurata.
  10. Adam's Cambrian

    A rangeomorph holdfast trace fossil from the Ediacara formation, Rawnsley quartzite of the Flinders Range, South Australia. This specimen is Medusina mawsoni, so called because it was until recently thought to be a jellyfish, but is now believed to be the attachment point of a fractal rangeomorph as Charniodiscus is the point of anchorage for Charnia sp. This one may have been the holdfast point for some species of Rangea. The diameter of the outer circle is 1.5 cm and the fossil is estimated to be 555 million years old.
  11. Purse State Park

    Hello, I was thinking of taking my kids to Purse State Park in Maryland in the coming week while the weather is still this warm, but I have not been there before and was wondering if jellyfish are as much of an issue when the water is warm as is the case in the Chesapeake Bay and places like Brownies Beach. I know very little about the Potomac and the water type and whether it is brackish enough to support jellyfish, hence my question :) Last thing I want is for a family outing looking for shark teeth to go south due to some floating menaces. Looking forward to getting to this location and sharing the finds with the forum. Thanks, Matt
  12. Another Jellyfish?

    Two halves of the same nodule.
  13. Do you know what this is?

    I don't know what this is, maybe a scyphozoan? https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B5lqA7GaQIJGODAxRFAtcmRuY1k https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B5lqA7GaQIJGTDFEZ0pIQ2xvcW8
  14. Oldest mass animal stranding revealed in Death Valley fossils New Scientist Daily News, July 26, 2017 https://www.newscientist.com/article/2141881-oldest-mass-animal-stranding-revealed-in-death-valley-fossils/ The publications are: Sappenfield, A.D., Tarhan, L.G. and Droser, M.L., 2017. Earth's oldest jellyfish strandings: a unique taphonomic window or just another day at the beach?. Geological Magazine, 154(4), pp.859-874. Abstract: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/geological-magazine/article/earths-oldest-jellyfish-strandings-a-unique-taphonomic-window-or-just-another-day-at-the-beach/BD3A332A705E4AFB44E32FFAD2060D56 PDF file: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/303955816_Earth's_oldest_jellyfish_strandings_a_unique_taphonomic_window_or_just_another_day_at_the_beach Sappenfield, A.D., 2015. Precambrian-Cambrian Sedimentology, Stratigraphy, and Paleontology in the Great Basin (Western United States). Unpublished PhD dissertation. University of California, Riverside. http://escholarship.org/uc/item/4r02d6xr Yours, Paul H.
  15. Recently, while I was doing field work volunteering for the Denver Botanic Gardens in Hoosier Pass, I took time over lunch to look for any potential fossils. What had found was very strange, they looked to be fossils of Essexella and Reticulomedusa as found in Mazon Creek nodules. I believe that the history would make sense for them to be able to be found in Colorado, but I do not know. Here are my photos, with a penny for scale. EDIT: I will reply with more photos due to the max filesize the one here appears to me to be Reticulomedusa, but I need an expert opinion to confirm or deny. I believe that the reason that they aren't in well-defined exposed nodules like in Mazon Creek is due to the fact that they would open annually due to the freeze-thaw process happening naturally, without having the rest of the surrounding rock mined away.
  16. Stranded jellyfish

    From the album Calvert Cliffs - 3/7/17

    Stranded jellyfish in a pool of water. These jelly fish were all over the beach.
  17. Is this a jellyfish?

    This looks an awful lot like a worn jellyfish fossil, however there are some stones with odd name that look similar, maybe trace fossil can't remember. The other side doesn't look like anything. North Texas Cretateous. Help!
  18. Pfalzpaint is famous for its jellyfish or Scyphozoa.
  19. Hello again to everyone on the forum and can't wait to learn from you. I just joined this week and this will be my first main post. I have always been very interested in fossils and geology and finally went on an official fossil Hunting trip this past week. I went with my family the first time and we scouted out the area. I did a lot of research beforehand and read that Pit 11 was one of the most popular concretion hunting spots at Mazon, but that also means they are harder to find. After more research, I decided we should check out an area to the south called the Mazonia South Unit. I read that this area had been less collected because there is much thicker vegetation. The vegetation was very thick. We hiked for a couple miles into the Forested area and we came to the bottom of a large hill. Me and my brother scaled the cliff and saw a way down the other side. The bottom of the other side of the cliff ended right into a river. After we made it to the bottom, my father found the first fossil, a small leaf, in an open concretion. We then saw concretions everywhere around us and started collecting. We only stayed for about an hour that day because the mosquitoes were relentless. I got home and saw I had some fossils and got so excited, I went back out there by myself the very next day. I scaled the cliffs up and down and got as many concretions as I could. Not satisfied, I just came back from another trip out to Mazon yesterday. I'm still refining my technique, but I spent most of the time going up and down the cliff sides looking and picking for concretions. I had a geologic pick, and a bag as my main tools. The first couple times, I picked everything I saw. After more research, I was more picky yesterday and did a lot of cracking in the field. I am not done processing all my concretions but I will post what I have found so far. Please let me know if you can help identify any of them and if the pictures are good for your viewing. Any general tips for fossil hunting and anything is also welcome I have more than I can post in this one post, but will follow up post with rest of my current photos.
  20. Mazon Creek Fauna

    A few items from my collection. Extra large Essexella asherae Multiple Essexella asherae Essexella asherae and worm
  21. This large specimen was identified long beforeI acquired it, as simply a jellyfish. Supposedly, and I have no reason to doubt it, it is from Pit 11, Mazon Creek. Does anyone have an idea on the particular jellyfish it might be? The small concretion (also Mazon Creek) carried no identification whatsoever, although I'm inclined to believe it could be either an Octomedusa pieckorum or Reticulomedusa Greenei. Any thoughts on this one? Thank you!
  22. What's In My Jelly?

    So i found this guy already popped at pit 11 South Unit. To my surprise and untrained Mazon eye i saw what looks to be something associated with my Essex jellyfish. Any ideas? Any and all help is appreciated. Thanks!
  23. Possible Mushroom Or Jellyfish?

    Hi, I am new to fossils and despite taking a few geology classes at Mizzou and searching through google I believe it is an Cnidaria but I am not sure, hopefully someone here is a bit more knowledgeable than I am haha. Thanks!
  24. Mazon Creek - Jellyfish

    Hi Folks- I've always thought this was a jellyfish from a Essex location. Folks agree?
×