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Found 19 results

  1. New Dinosaur Education Displays

    We did a lot more work on our shark stuff this summer than dinosaurs but we did change how display the non touch fossils. We added a few new items too but stayed light on additions. First up is our updated Cretaceous North Africa display. We added a really nice theropod tooth that fits @Troodon ‘s Morph Type 4 Dromaeosaurid-like profile hence the label for the program. We explain the ID difficulties of fossils so for a tooth like this they know we are not sure of what critter had this tooth. I am pretty happy with how this one looks. We give a nice picture of Cretaceous North Africa from two different times. This is an important part of our program and we have some nice fossils I think. We also have two touch fossils with this section. A limb bone that we go with Spino as the critter and one is a theropod very that we use to talk about Deltadromeus.
  2. Tyrannosaurid Indet Confirmation

    Hello all, Recently acquired 2 teeth, found and sold together, that I would love some insight and second opinions on. Both teeth are described as Tyrannosaurid Indet, from the Judith River Formation. The seller described that he purchased them both together from the harvester, but due to the fact he was not the original collector, the information is isolated to the above information. Smaller tooth is 15/16" long, dark chocolate color, and 1/4" wide. Serrations are present on front and rear edges, with serrations starting midway on the front edge. Larger tooth is missing the front edge, appears sheared. Length is 1 1/8", width 5/16". Serrations present cleanly on rear edge, but again completely sheared from front edge. Color also deeper chocolate brown, but more horizontal banding. Can obtain more detailed and specific measurements of other needed dimensions if needed. Mainly I'm looking for a confirmation of Tyrannosaurid Indet distinguished from other theropods in the area at the time, as I have little experience positively IDing smaller tyrannosaurid material. I've actively worked on distinguishing Carcharodontosaur teeth from Rugops in the field in Morocco, but this is out of my field. All help is greatly appreciated! Will post more pictures in comments
  3. Some very nice dinosaur material is being offered for sale but their identifications need some massaging. This beautiful tooth is being identified as Gorgosaurus from the Judith River Fm. Its a "Tryannosaurid indet. " since we cannot distinguish teeth between Gorgo and Daspletosaurus.. Looks like an anterior dentary position. This gorgeous rooted hadrosaur tooth is being identified has Lambeosaurus also from the JRF. Most seasoned collectors know its very difficult to distinguish teeth between different hadrosaur species. Quite a few are described from the JRF not sure if Lambeo is one. Best identified : Hadrosaurid indet. A Majungatholus tooth from Madagascar is also offered. Unfortunately the tooth is clearly not an Abelsaurid so it cannot be Majungatholus or properly called Majungasaurus. What is it I really do not know since very little is described from the Maevarano Formation. It also brings to question if the locality is correct. "This tooth was already posted on the forum" From the Judith River Formation the seller is offering this Troodon foot Claw. Only two photos were included in the listing so it was difficult to tell but initally it does not look like one more like an Oviraptorid claw. If you are interested I would ask for more photos so we can have a better look. From the Cloverly this bone is being offered as a humerus from a Tenontosaurus. I do not believe its one and have included the arm of a Tenontosaurus from my collection to see what one looks like. Its the bone on the left. Could be an ulna but not sure.
  4. Strange juvenile gorgosaurus tooth

    On my birthday I got a juvenile gorgosaur tooth didn’t look special other then the colour but then I started to check it out and study it and instead of serrations there were small holes so I came up with a theory how juvenile tyrannosaurs didn’t have serrations until they got older yet I still need more proof to back up my theory but I found it interesting it was collected on a ranch in the Judith River formation not to far from the Canadian border it is 75 million years old here are some photos of it.
  5. Today is my last day off before I go back to work and I was supposed to spend the day making fossil starter kits. I have a cold though and I do not want the kids to think that 12 million year old shark teeth gave them a cold lol I am pretty bored so I thought I would post about our Judith River dinosaur fossils and how we are going to get discuss this formation. I am really surprised how much I am enjoying learning about these dinosaurs and this will be a formation that we spend a good bit of time on. It must have had some very productive ecosystems and there is a great diversity here to discuss. The kids will also get to see some familiar dinosaur families while learning about species that are new to them. I think during adaptation related presentations, this formation lets us get into ecological niches and discuss how two Tyrannosaurids existed as did at least two species of Dromaeosaurids and a Troodonitd plus other predators including non dinos. That is a lot of hungry mouths so niche selection and adaptations become very important. THere is also a great diversity of herbivores in this formation. I love the Ceratopsians from this formation and the diversity gives my son a lot of artistic options. We currently have one tooth but by the time we present we will have a couple more I think. This allows us to present a few species and say the teeth are not diagnostic so the teeth could have belonged to one or more really cool looking horned dinosaurs. This also gives the kids knowledge that there other Ceratopsians besides Triceratops. This will also be the point where we introduce Dromaeosaurids. Raptors are just iconic and this formation gives us the chance to really hit on adaptations. We have a Saurornitholestes tooth and will soon have a Dormaeosaurid caudal vertebra. While not assigned specifically to Dromaeosaurus, the vert will presented that way so we can talk about the differences between the two raptors. Of particular interest is the larger skull, more robust teeth, and specific wear patterns on the teeth of Dromaeosaurus. We will also have a small tooth tip from a Tyrannosaur indet. The kids will love learning about other Tyrannosaurids and I will leave it to the kids to imagine which one it belonged to. The real owner of the tooth is not important. That two existed in this formation is what is important. They must have occupied different niches plus a lot of kids may think T-Rex was the only member of that family. The last fossil I know we will have from Judith River is one of my favorites. It is an Ankylosaurus tooth and thanks to some help from TFF members, I spotted this among a few Nodosaur teeth. In our inventory, this is Ankylosaurus indet. However, in every single dinosaur presentation we do this will be Zuul and it will be a rock star. We want the kids to understand that there are many new discoveries being made and there will be a lot of new dinosaur discoveries made by THEIR generation. Everything about Zuul will be cool to kids. It is the one of the most incredible fossils ever found, armored dinosaurs are just cool, and it even has a pop culture name that a lot of kids will recognize from Ghostbusters lol Only 5 fossils but we can do A LOT of quality education with these fossils. I also have a very clear idea of the next items to find from Judith River. #1 on that list is a Dromaeosaurus tooth. A tooth gives us the perfect way of illustrating the difference between the raptors. We have two more purchases to complete before I buy again so I will save up and in the spring I start searching for that tooth. I also would love to add a hadrosaur bone from this formation and eventually I will track down a frill piece. Anyway, here a couple of the fossils... Pic 1- our Saurornitholestes tooth. Not a great picture but a really nice tooth. Pic 2- the Dormaeosaurid indet vert. Not here yet but will be right around my B-day. Pic 3- the Anky tooth. It is just a cool tooth and Zuul is a great dinosaur to teach kids about so Zuul is what this tooth is for Fossils on Wheels. Our only fossil from an armored dinosaur.
  6. I was hoping somebody on TFF might be able to point me in the direction of any scientific papers, research or information that members here might have put together regarding dromaeosaurid theropods from the Judith River formation. This is not really about identifying any teeth, though I do have one from that formation. I am starting to do my research for the education program and am looking for scientific information. From what I can gather, there is a possible Saurornitholestes species and of course the dinosaur I have seen referred to as Julieraptor, which is a interesting story all on its own. I have also seen Dromaeosaurus listed from that formation. I would like to sort out what is known and unknown from the formation and the best way to present our "raptor" tooth to the kids. Any help links or suggestions as to where I might find more information on this would be much appreciated
  7. Daspletosaurus tooth?

    Hello everybody So this tooth here is up for sale. Described as a Daspletosaurus tooth from the Judith River Formation. (Not more information) Length: 5,3 cm or around 2 inches. There seems to be some crack repair on the tip but other then that it looks good to me. What I wondering is, if it's possible to describe this as a Daspletosaurus tooth? Or are there just to few information for a proper identification? Any help on what I am looking at is very welcome. Thank you!
  8. Mystery Judith River Dinosaur Bone

    Here’s one that has me scratching my head. It’s a bone I found in the Judith River Formation of Montana recently, I picked up these two pieces and later realized they go together. They’re definitely placed properly, but the shape is strange and I can’t ID it. My initial thoughts were some type of hadrosaur toe bone, but I can’t find any close matches online. What are y’all’s thoughts on this one?
  9. Theropod Teeth ID's Check

    I believe I know the answers but like to confirm the ID's and raise a red flag if appropriate. Seller is offering the following from the Judith River Formation of Montana Saurnitholestes Tooth 1/4" Aublysodon Tooth 3/4" Daspletosaurus tooth 1.4" Daspletosaurus tooth 7/8"
  10. Some Judith River IDs

    Here are some small fossils I found back in the summer of 2017 in Montana up in the Judith River Formation. 1. Small reptile vertebra? (.5 cm) 2. Assorted tiny bones several of which are likely from birds. 2a. Hollow at the broken end (about .8 cm). 2b. Hollow at both ends (1.2 cm). 2c. Hollow at both ends as well, looks like limb bone. (1.5 cm). 2d. Appears to be hollow on both ends (.7 cm).
  11. Seller has listed these teeth as Daspletosaurus from the Judith River Fm, Hill County Montana Can you determine if this is a correct ID for these teeth. Thanks .
  12. Consolidated all my informational Topics to make it easier to reference. Will keep updating since some of the reference material is outdated. Have to thank @PFOOLEY for suggesting this consolidation and it makes it a lot easier for me to access these topics as well as our members to know what's out there. General Tips in Buying Theropod Teeth Dinosaur Anatomy 101 Stratigraphy of the Late Cretaceous in North America Best Books for Dinosaur Identification Triassic Identification of Dinosaur Teeth from the Triassic of New Mexico Jurassic: Morisson Formation Identification of Theropod Teeth Tips in Buying a Sauropod Foot Claw Ornithischians from the Morisson Formation Jurassic: Europe Dinosaurs of Costal Portugal Jurassic Theropods of Germany Cretaceous: North America Identification of Theropod Teeth in the Hell Creek and Lance Formations Identification of Troodontid Teeth Identification of Tyrannosaurid Teeth From North America Identification of Ankylosaurid Teeth Identification of Acheroraptor Teeth North American Tyrannosaurids what is Described Identification of Claws and Ungals from the Hell Creek and Lance Formations Identification of Pachycephalosaurid and Thescelosaurus Teeth Tooth Features in Tyrannosaurids The Case for Nannotyrannus Dakotaraptor Teeth and Claws Hell Creek Fm Identification of Bones /Claws from Alvarezsaurids from North America Hell Creek Faunal Representation Identification of Theropod Teeth from Judith River and Two Medicine Formations . Theropod Assemblage of New Jersey Cretaceous: Kem Kem of Morocco Kem Kem Theropod Teeth Kem Kem Theropod Tooth Morphology Identification of Sauropod Teeth from the Kem Kem Tips in Purchasing a Spinosaurid Hand Claw Identification of Claws from the Kem Kem Identification of Spinosaurid Jaws from the Kem Kem Republic of Niger Identification of Theropod Teeth Cretaceous: South America Patagonia's Theropod Teeth Cretaceous: Uzbekistan: Identification of Theropod Teeth: Uzbekistan Sauropod Teeth: Uzbekistan Cretaceous: Europe Identifying Baryonyx Teeth
  13. Raptor tooth to id

    Hello! I have purchased this nice raptor tooth from Judith River formation. I think this is saurornitholestes tooth. Am I correct? Thanks in advance!
  14. Troodontids certainly are one of my favorite dinosaur families. Intelligent and what a set of chompers to eat you with, all you can ask for in a cool dinosaur. Will start this with the Pectinodon teeth in my collection and will continue to add as I take photos. This species has some of the coolest teeth. Pectinodon bakkeri is the only named Troodontid in the Hell Creek and Lance Formations. This is a tooth taxon and its teeth are significantly much smaller than its big cousin Troodon formosus. Lance Formation Hell Creek Formation A couple of the teeth in matrix are partially rooted which is extremely rare since the teeth are so small Hell Creek Formation - Powder River County Hell Creek Formation
  15. Raptor vertebra?

    I just recently bought this on a certain auction site (that I've been spending too much time on lately). The seller said it is most likely a raptor caudal vertebra. It was a surface find from the Judith River Formation about 30 miles north of Glasgow, Montana. Is the seller's ID accurate?
  16. Paleontologists unearth more dinosaur fossils north of Rudyard By: Josh Meny, MTN News, KRTV, Great Falls, Montana, Aug. 19, 2017 http://www.krtv.com/story/36172339/paleontologists-unearth-more-dinosaur-fossils-north-of-rudyard Redding Farms has unearthed dinosaur fossils for decades By: Josh Meny, MTN News, KXLH, Helena, Montana, Aug. 19, 2017 http://www.kxlh.com/story/36170618/redding-farms-has-unearthed-dinosaur-fossils-for-decades Down on the dinosaur farm By Martin J. Kidston Independent Record, August 6, 2005 http://helenair.com/news/down-on-the-dinosaur-farm/article_0d3f3f53-a8ca-5a9f-8596-a97319bdaddb.html Yours, Paul H.
  17. Hard to keep up to new discoveries and when I see one from the Judith River Formation from Montana even though its a year old it attracts my attention. Material from this fauna is constantly being offered for sale and can be collected with access to ranches. A new ceratopsid, Spiclypeus shipporum from the lower Coal Ridge Member of the Judith River Formation was described and I've attached the article for viewing. I want to remind collectors that its not possible to know the species of teeth, horns and unguals being sold from large bodied ceratopsians. So be careful of sellers trying to put species names to their offerings. This figure was included in the paper and what's interesting is it shows what dinosaurs have been described from this fauna and material that as only been identified to a family level. Article: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0154218
  18. Dinosaur tooth

    Left tooth is 1.375 inch long compared to the right tooth 3.625 inches long! Just found them 9/10/16
  19. From Western Digs: One of the most abundant and diverse families of dinosaurs from the Ancient West has a new member among its ranks. Two new specimens of ceratopsid, or horn-faced dinosaur, have been found in separate locations in the U.S. and Canada, and their shared features are so distinctive that paleontologists say they “definitively” represent a species that’s new to science. The whole story http://westerndigs.org/new-species-of-horned-dinosaur-with-flashy-butterfly-shaped-frill-discovered-in-montana/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+westerndigsorg+%28Western+Digs%29 The team reports their find in the journal Naturwissenschaften.
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