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Found 355 results

  1. Port Mulgrave find, looks unusual, any ideas ? Thanks.
  2. sea urchin

    Hi friends , i found this sea urchin when i was looking for fossils to the north of my city Riyadh , it is a sea urchin can you help me I.D it
  3. Lit.: Schröder, K. M.; López-Arbarello, A.; Ebert, M. (2012). "Macrosemimimus, gen. nov. (Actinopterygii, Semionotiformes), from the Late Jurassic of Germany, England, and France". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 32 (3): 512–529. doi:10.1080/02724634.2012.649626.
  4. Could some expert have a look and tell me whether this is a bone or not? It was found in Bathonian layer in Gnaszyn, Poland.
  5. Moroccan Jurassic Ammonite

    I just received this large and beautiful Jurassic ammonite from Morocco, from near Talsint. I was wondering if anyone might be able to identify it for me. The sutures are definitely ammonitic, but that's about all I got.
  6. Ammonites from Morocco

    Hi all, I got those ammonites from @cheney416 in a blind trade. They come from Morocco, but the exact location is unknown. Apparently they are from the Bajocian stage of the Jurassic; 170 mya), but I can't find any Jurassic locations in Morocco containing ammonites... Does anyone know what species these are, and what location they could come from? Thanks, Max
  7. Cold blustery day on the north coast of Normandy at Villers sur Mer The rock strata starts with upper callovian to the middle Oxfordian Jurassic capped with Lower cenomanian upper greensand Cretaceous
  8. Hi there. I recently purchased a big box full of shale, containing a number of disarticulated ichthyosaur bones from South Wales. Mostly ribs, but there's also a humerus and one or two other unidentified bones too. It's not an amazing piece, but I'd consider it good practice. I've been trying to work out how to prep it. It's in many pieces, and putting them together is a bit of a task in itself! As you can see from this terrible photo, I've made some progress. I've numbered the joins so that their positions can be found easily, and drawn in marker pen on the surface of the shale where the bones appear to run beneath. I'd appreciate any advice from anyone that's done this sort of thing before. This is how I intend on proceeding: 1. Complete the jigsaw - and hope it all fits together! 2. Prep each piece to expose the bones 3. Set the pieces onto some kind of backing - not sure what? 4. Tidy up the prep, and use epoxy clay to fill the cracks. If anyone has any suggestions, I'd be very grateful. I've never dealt with any icthyosaur material before.
  9. Ebertichthys ettlingensis Arratia, 2016

    From the album Vertebrates

    Ebertichthys ettlingensis Arratia, 2016 Late Jurassic Tithonian Breitenhill Bavaria Germany
  10. Fossil Crinoid Pentacrinites Stem.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fossil Crinoid Pentacrinites Stem Lincoln County, Wyoming, USA TIME PERIOD: Jurassic Period (145.5 to 199.6 million years) Pentacrinites is an extinct genus of crinoids that lived from the Middle Triassic to the Eocene of Asia, Europe, North America, and New Zealand. Their stems are pentagonal to star-shaped in cross-section and are the most commonly preserved parts. Pentacrinites are commonly found in the Pentacrinites Bed of the Early Jurassic (Lower Lias) of Lyme Regis, Dorset, England. Pentacrinites can be recognized by the extensions (or cirri) all around the stem, which are long, unbranching, and of increasing length further down, the very small cup and 5 long freely branching arms. Like most echinoderms, Pentacrinites was composed of numerous calcite plates which were arranged into different body parts. Pentacrinites had 3 kinds of body parts: arms, cup (calyx or theca) and stem. The stem consisted of a stack of numerous 5-sided beads (or columnal plates) with a canal at their centre. The stem had flexible appendages (or cirri) that were used to attach an individual. These cirri themselves were connected to specialized columnals called nodals, leaving oval scars after breaking off. The cirri consisted of diamond-shaped plates with a central canal, less flatted further from the stem. The cup-shaped calyx was very small and consisted of two bands of five plates. These were the bases of the five arms. The top of the calyx was covered by numerous small polygonal plates and the mouth and anus were found on this surface. The arms divide frequently, like tree branches, so that at the top end there could be over than 50 branches in all. The arms were formed of piles of calcite plates. The arms carried many thin feeding branches (or pinnae, like a fern frond). These pinnae had tube feet, that were covered in mucus, reached into the water and caught plankton. These arms were not very mobile. The arms plates of the arms have an insertion, that formed a grove that ran along the length of the arm and onto the calyx. This served to transport the food particles to the mouth. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Crinozoa Order: Isocrinida Family: †Pentacrinitidae Genus: †Pentacrinites
  11. Belemnite Fossils, Germany.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Belemnite Fossils SITE LOCATION: Lias Altdorf, Germany TIME PERIOD: Jurassic Period (~ 180 million years ago) Data: Belemnitida (or belemnites) is an extinct order of cephalopods which existed during the Mesozoic era, from the Hettangian age of the Lower Jurassic to the Maastrichtian age of the Upper Cretaceous. The belemnite is the state fossil of Delaware. Belemnites were superficially squid-like. They possessed ten arms of equal length studded with small inward-curving hooks used for grasping prey. However, they lacked the pair of specialized tentacles present in modern squid. Belemnites (and other belemnoids) were distinct from modern squid by possessing hard internal skeletons. The internal skeleton was composed of the guard or rostrum (plural: rostra), a heavy solid structure at the posterior of the animals. The rostrum was usually bullet-shaped and projects prominently backward, but in the suborder Belemnotheutina, it was only present as a thin layer. While the inherited camerate portion of the internal skeleton (see below) was of aragonite, the evolutionarily novel rostrum was composed of calcite. Due to its more geologically stable calcite constitution, the rostrum is often the only remains of the animals preserved, often in very large numbers in a given area. The rostrum is in turn attached to a chambered conical shell known as the phragmocone. At the tip of the phragmocone beneath the rostrum is a tiny spherical or cuplike nodule known as the protoconch, the remains of the embryonic shell. The space between the phragmocone and the rostrum is known as the alveolus (plural: alveoli). At the forward part of the phragmocone is a thin very fragile structure known as the proostracum (plural: proostraca). It is usually spoon-like in shape. It extends over the dorsal part of the mantle. Fossils which preserve the soft parts of belemnites indicate that like modern coleoids, they possessed an ink sac, hard beaks, tail fins that were either apical or lateral, and large eyes. Additionally they had a pro-ostracum which is a tongue-like projection from the main body of the shell. Well preserved specimens have even retained evidence of strong muscular fibers in the mantle, indicating that they were powerful swimmers like modern squid and unlike other cephalopods of their time such as ammonoids and cymatoceratid nautiloids. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Order: †Belemnitida
  12. Pollished belemnites.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Polished Belemnites SITE LOCATION: Madagascar TIME PERIOD: Jurassic (~145-201 Million Years Ago) Belemnitida (or belemnites) is an extinct order of cephalopods which existed during the Mesozoic era, from the Hettangian age of the Lower Jurassic to the Maastrichtian age of the Upper Cretaceous. The belemnite is the state fossil of Delaware. Belemnites were superficially squid-like. They possessed ten arms of equal length studded with small inward-curving hooks used for grasping prey. However, they lacked the pair of specialized tentacles present in modern squid. Belemnites (and other belemnoids) were distinct from modern squid by possessing hard internal skeletons. The internal skeleton was composed of the guard or rostrum (plural: rostra), a heavy solid structure at the posterior of the animals. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Order: †Belemnitida
  13. Jurassic vertebra

    Eroded vertebra from North of France. I included a mirrored image. Deposits are late Jurassic, marine and terrestrial. Lenght: about 10 cm. I know this is difficult but any suggestions?
  14. Pliosaurus tooth?

    Hello, I found this tooth in a jurassic formation (tithonian) in Torres Vedras - Portugal. It's the first time I found a tooth like this. I don't know if it's croc or maybe pliosaurus?
  15. Pterosaur tooth?

    Hello, I need help to identify this tooth, found by me in a Jurassic formation in Portugal. My first thought it's Pterosaur. I wait for your opinions. The tooth have 1cm. Thanks, Filipe
  16. Hi all, On a recent trip to the seaside cliffs of Port Waikato, NZ, I found this little beauty amongst the indistinguishable fossilised plant matter that is common along the beach. Does anyone have an idea of what it might be? According to geological maps, the area that I found this in was a part of the Apotu group (Late Jurassic), although could of also been from the nearby Huriwai group. Cheers, TJ
  17. ANCESTRAL MAMMAL TEETH

    http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-41889633 Ancient mammal teeth discovered in Dorset, UK
  18. Paddle bone?

    Hello, Everyone. This is another sample from Runswick Bay on Yorkshires Jurassic Coast. I'm hoping that someone will tell me that is a paddle bone from a marine reptile. All replies gratefully recieved.
  19. Unidentified jurassic find

    Hi, Everyone. This is something I picked up at Runswick Bay on Yorkshires Jurassic coast. The curve looks organic but I suspect that it may be a geological nodule. Any comments would be welcome.
  20. Friday morning, good weather, a beautiful hunt first on the coast of northern France The jurassic part in the morning
  21. Pleuropholis laevissima Agassiz, 1834

    From the album Vertebrates

    Pleuropholis laevissima Agassiz, 1834 Upper Jurassic Tithonian Solnhofen Germany Unspectacular looking fish, but very rare.
  22. Hello, this is a part 2 of my last thread with some of my other finds that I've found this at a site in new jersey where some footprints have been found from the Late Triassic/Early Jurassic, I am unsure about if these are footprints of sorts, any help will be appreciated thank you!
  23. Hello, I've found this at a site in new jersey where some footprints have been found from the Late Triassic/Early Jurassic, I am unsure about if this is a footprint of sorts, any help will be appreciated thank you!
  24. Unknown British Jurassic fossil

    Can anybody please ID this? Found it on the Somerset coast, in the UK. Although the rocks there span from the Triassic to the Jurassic, I believe this is probably Jurassic, because rocks with this appearance sometimes contain ammonites.
  25. Fossil of ‘fish lizard’ from Jurassic-era found: Researchers relate India to Gondawana, The TeCake, October 27, 2017 https://tecake.in/news/science/first-jurassic-era-fish-lizard-fossil-discovered-gujarats-kutch-area-39424.html First Jurassic ichthyosaur fossil found in India https://phys.org/news/2017-10-jurassic-ichthyosaur-fossil-india.html Prasad, G.V.R., Pandey, D.K., Alberti, M., Fürsich, F.T., Thakkar, M.G., and Chauhan, G.D. 2017. Discovery of the first ichthyosaur from the Jurassic of India: Implications for Gondwanan palaeobiogeography. PLoS ONE 12(10): e0185851. doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0185851 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0185851 Yours, Paul H.
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