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Found 967 results

  1. Circles on Sand Dollar

    I’ve had this mepygurus marmonti sand dollar from the Jurassic of Madagascar for years now and when I was looking at it I noticed these small circles on the bottom. Are these on every sand dollar, it appears to be a part of it so my guess was some sort of way for tiny legs to attach but it’s just a guess the sand dollar is 7.5 centimeters and each dot is just under 1 millimeter
  2. Hi, I've had this for some time and it looks very much like a plant, or perhaps I'm just imagining things. It's from the Dyrham formation, which is Pliensbachian I believe. The split rock measures 2.8 cm across and 3.9cm in length. The picture in this would look like the stem, and I'll post a picture on the possible 'leaves' in a second. Thanks
  3. Turiasauria indet.

  4. Whitby find - bone/wood?

    Just found this on a morning stroll on a beach near Whitby, North Yorkshire, UK. Thought at best it may be a piece of reptile bone, maybe a piece of wood if not. Saw some nice plant material too, we were going to pick the larger pieces up on our return trip but the incoming tide made us decide against it. Thanks for looking
  5. Zoophycos?

    Hey all. Found this sort of trace fossil I'm assuming, in some shale shelves. My initial thought was Gryphaea but it lacks the proper lines and structure to be a shell. Now I'm leaning towards Zoophycos. Can anyone confirm if it is zoophycos, and help with the morphology of this specific find? I'm under the impression that zoophycos morphology changed throughout the ages, and I'm trying to reverse ID the age of rocks I found it in since the geological maps of my area are extremely vague and lack detail. Let me know if more angles are required for this ID. Cheers.
  6. Dealing with marine algae

    Hello everyone, I found the below ichthyosaur vertebra on the beach at Wimereux two weeks ago. It had obviously been lying there for some time, as it was covered in green algae and barnacles. Based on the advise of various friends and the fact this rock seems to hard and massive to work through using just my Dremel, I'll be leaving the fossil in its matrix. However, I do want to clean it up from the algae and barnacles. As such, I used a 1:2 dilution of 14° household cleaning vinegar and a couple of sturdy brushes to remove most of the algae (dipping the brushes in the solution between brushings) and soaked it in soapy hot water. Areas with tougher algae were treated using the undiluted vinegar. Today removed the remaining barnacles using wooden toothpicks, following it with another soak in hot soapy water and another rinse. Although I think this got rid of all the barnacles, and the piece is no longer entirely coated in green algae, there are still various green spots on the rock (and a slight green sheen on the vertebra itself) that haven't come out with the treatment. (Also the "dead fish smell" still lingers) This makes me wonder about the following things: 1. Can the algae regrow, given enough light and moisture in the air? 2. Has anyone ever experienced algae spreading in their collection after failing to remove all traces of algae (I mean, fungi will spread between books and, as I understand, algae can transmit their spores by air)? 3. Is there a way I can get rid of the remaining algae on the rock? E.g. exposure to sun/UV light? 4. Is there a way something can be done about the slight lingering smell, or is this just something that needs to dissipate over time? Now I read some of you prefer using diluted bleach to remove algae growth from fossils (as mentioned in the post below), but I'm not sure I feel comfortable playing around with such aggressive agents yet...
  7. Whitby area find

    Whilst on a long walk today in the Runswick Bay area looking for ammonites to practice my new air pen on, my daughter picked this up and commented that ‘it looks like poo’ (as most nine year olds probably would) As I could offer no other identification for it I thought I’d ask here. There are also a couple of bivalves or similar to the side of it. Thank you for looking
  8. Scelidosaurus: ready for its closeup at last The first complete dinosaur skeleton ever identified has finally been studied in detail and found its place in the dinosaur family tree, completing a project that began more than 150 years ago. University of Cambridge One of four newly published papers listed in the above article: Norman, D.B., 2020. Scelidosaurus harrisonii (Dinosauria: Ornithischia) from the Early Jurassic of Dorset, England: biology and phylogenetic relationships. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. Yours, Paul H.
  9. Ichthyosaur paddle digit (Wimereux): hit or miss

    Hi all, Found this stone at Pointe aux Oies in Wimereux two days ago, amongst the pebbles collected next to a shelve down towards sea from the spot where I had found an ichthyosaur vertebra (on matrix) two days before this find. I picked it up because 1) the stone is unusually flat; 2) has exactly the right shape and thickness to it for an ophthalmosaurid ichthyosaur paddle bone (see picture below); 3) has certain ornamentation top and bottom; 4) seems to be of a different type of stone than I've generally come across in the area; and 5) has some weight to it. It vaguely reminds me of paddle bones found in the Oxford Clay at Peterborough. Yet, what makes me doubt, though, is that there is no clear radial ornamentation on either top or bottom of the piece, as would by typical for an ichthyosaur paddle bone. A friend of mine, more familiar with fossils from the region, suggested it could be a crocodile scute, as the ones found further up the coast, but this, to me, seems unlikely, as 1) the ornamentation on my find differs significantly from what's typical for crocodilians; 2) the underside is not flat as it would be for crocodile; and 3) the piece seem to thick for a scute. Size is about 4.4 x 3.4 x 1.4 cm (1.7 x 1.3 x 0.6 ") Brachypterygius extremus paddle from Ichthyosaurs: a day in the life... My piece reminds me of the radius. Now my question is: Is this just a rock - i.e. am I seeing things because I really want to - or is it an actual fossil? Is this an ichthyosaur paddle bone/phalange or something else?
  10. Ichthyosaur vertebrae

    I bought this ichthyosaur vertebrae several years ago. The website write that the vertebrae is from Brachypterygius. Do you know if it is true? AGE Middle Jurassic LOCATION Weymouth Harbour, Dorest, England FORMATION Kimmeridge Clay SIZE 3.2" wide, 1.2" tall
  11. Oddly shaped bone in pebble from Cap Gris Nez

    Hi all, Found this pebble on the beach close to Audresselles (Cap Gris Nez area, Boulonnais) amidst the heavy rain and wind yesterday. Initially, I thought it was just a piece of odd-looking fossilised plant-material, with a faint thought in the back of my mind that may be it could be a fish skull. When I checked it this morning, I was able to confirm the piece is smooth on the outside, and seems to have what appears to be bone fibres on the inside. In other words, I'm convinced now that it actually is bone, though still have no idea what kind...
  12. A lucky find has revealed evidence of dinosaurs in Scotland outside of the Isle of Skye for the first time. A single bone, thought to belong to a Stegosaur, was quite literally stumbled upon on the small Scottish island of Eigg. The bone, measuring 500mm, is believed to be from the Middle Jurassic (166 myo). Read more at the BBC here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-53917742
  13. Marine reptile tooth

    From the album Fossil Collection

  14. Hemicidaris (?)

    From the album Fossil Collection

  15. Seatown U.K vertebra I.D

    Hello, as part of a great hunt at Seatown on the jurassic coast I found this vertebra covered in pyrite, my first thought is plesiosaur due to the size of it. However the upper surface looks unusual to other plesiosaur verts Ive seen, any thoughts?
  16. Possible Jurassic Wood-boring Bivalve

    This specimen was found in the Harrison Lake area of southwestern British Columbia, in beds reliably dated late middle Jurassic (Callovian). It appears to be a bivalve shell with two large protuberances emerging from it. The wood-boring bivalves Pholadacea come to mind, but, since I have no record of anything like this from the area, and no experience with these forms, I welcome your comments and suggestions.
  17. Dorset find

    Found this yesterday on the foreshore at Redcliff Point, Dorset. It’s mineralised; feels like rock and sounds like rock when tapped against another. Could it be a piece of fossilised wood, or even rib bone, or has some other process caused the appearance? Thanks for looking
  18. Help with ID for these please

    I keep finding small rocks at the base of banks alongside the road, around the area where I live in Bath, UK. Most of them contain bivalves but I keep coming across this shape which I can’t recognise (picture 1) Picture 2 is a close-up of rock A which seems least weathered. I think these are the imprints left behind by something but I also have an example of what I think could be the actual object itself (please excuse my lack of terminology!) but it’s tiny compared to the other three examples (picture 3) Any help with this would be great thanks.
  19. I took my daughter to the Natural History Museum in London last year and the highlight was seeing Mary Anning’s ichthyosaurs, so we’ve been planning this week away ever since. Unfortunately we haven’t found any bones yet but we’ve found a few nice samples that I’ll get up here once we’re home. Here’s a few pictures from today’s walk along Monmouth beach, hunting in the land of giants!
  20. Dorset Petrified Wood

    Found this sticking out of a mud slide near Golden Cap on the Dorset coast. Certainly looks like wood, it doesn’t feel as hard as stone but harder than wood, I suppose like coal. Is it definitely petrified and is anyone able to speculate on age, possible species etc? Thank you in advance
  21. Ancient sea creatures spent years crossing the ocean on rafts – we’ve worked out how it was possible. Aaron W. hunter, he Conversation, August 10, 2020 Hunter, A.W., Casenove, D., Mayers, C. and Mitchell, E.G., 2020. Reconstructing the ecology of a Jurassic pseudoplanktonic raft colony. Royal Society Open Science, 7(7), p.200142. Abstract of open access paper PDF of open access paper Yours, Paul H.
  22. Pyrite Ammonite?

    I know it’s probably pyrite but is the ammonite shape just a coincidence playing tricks on the eye, or could this actually be an ammonite? Found by my daughter today on Charmouth beach, Dorset
  23. Jurassic fish (?) tooth for ID

    Hi, what do you think of this tooth? It's of round section (at the base), has carinae, rooted probably. Possible ID: Eutrichiurides, Lepisosteus or maybe something like croc? Middle Tithonian, Jurassic, Moscow, Russia (marine environment). 7 mm length. Provenance is not crucial, IMHO, if you have something similar, for example, from Dorset, please let me know. "frontal" view round base "side view", carinae a "head" is visible here, it was probably the part that stuck out of the jaw view from above, sorry for blurriness
  24. Hi all! Following the first topic I'll show you another fossil layer in that same location, Epivirgatites nikitini ammonite zone. It's the lowest of the three layers in Fili Park, relates to the middle Tithonian (Volgian, upper Jurassic) and is known for big ammonites and vertebrate remains. It's the last remaining accessible site in the region where you can count on finding Jurassic vertebrates. The finds are stable, but small, scarce and involve sifting.
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