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Found 248 results

  1. given its age,the taxonomy might have obsolete elements Hahngermany1968_Bathonian_Haploceratids.pdf
  2. Jurassic, flint, Kraków region, Poland, coin size=15,50mm crinoid skeletal elements?
  3. Following on from a post in the questions forum, I was trying to identify this species of belemnite that I picked up on Friday from the Oxford Clay at Whittlesey, and learn generally how to identify species myself, rather than squeak 'thunderbolt' excitedly. It struck me as unusual partly because its shape is different from most of the belemnites I see in the Oxford Clay, but also because of the strange white coating. Aragonite is preserved at the site, and I thought perhaps it had aragonite around the calcium carbonate rostrum. Sadly it broke as I extracted it from the clay. It is conical, depressed, very acute and has a deep groove. I was using Fossils of the Oxford Clay to identify it, but although it is most similar to Belemnopsis bessina, I then decided it couldn't be because it is not hastate. But rereading the description it does say it can be weakly hastate, and it might be. Also in favour of this specimen being this species is the flattened apex and kidney shaped transverse section caused by the deep groove. I was possibly overthinking things. It would be reassuring to have other people's input Other features include a strange ridge on the reverse. Not seen that before. Also, just for fun, an 8mm belemnite. I'm not expecting to ever identify it, but it's cute and I thought I'd share.
  4. The tiny tooth is Jurassic, from the Oxford Clay at Whittlesey. I think it's marine reptile from its shape, but not sure which one. The second one I found last year, and I'm baffled by it. I think it might be fish. Any suggestions would be very welcome!
  5. As crania go,a reasonably well preserved specimen barretyunnannosaudinosaujurasj.1096-3642.2007.00290.x.pdf
  6. From the album Nigel's album

    UK Lower Lias, Jurassic coast Prepared by Andy Cowap.
  7. Lit.: Wei D. D., Liang J. H. & Ren D. 2013. — A new fossil genus of Fuziidae (Insecta, Blattida) from the Middle Jurassic of Jiulongshan Formation, China. Geodiversitas 35 (2): 335-343. http://dx.doi.org/10.5252/g2013n2a3
  8. Dear Guys, I am young fossil explorer from Lithuania, Baltic States. There are some Jurassic and Cretaceous erratics in my area, where should be possible to find some reptile remains. I think this type of rock is very common in Devonian but when I showed one fragment to scientific doctor in Vilnius University he said that similar rocks can be found even to Cretaceous. The tooth is quite uncommon in the majority of bony fishes because of its appearance, I think. It is more characteristic to crocodiles or other reptiles. The length of the tooth is 8 mm. The turtle scutes in my opinion are too big to placoderms like Asterolepis or Bothriolepis, and they are also very thick. There are three fragments of them, the largest is 2,5 cm in length and 4 mm thickness, the second is 2,1 cm in length and 3 mm thickness, and the third- 1,6 cm in length and ~2,5 mm thickness. Please help me to confirm these ideas if you can. Best Regards, Domas
  9. Hey everyone, Here a brachiopod from Lion-sur-mer (France); Bathonian stage, Jurassic. Any clue on the species? Best regards, Max
  10. Hi all, Here another brachiopod from Lion-sur-mer, France; Bathonian stage, Jurassic. Any clue on the species? Thanks in advance, Max
  11. After the reopening of the quarry in Holzmaden i visited the quarry Kromer yesterday (Lower Jurassic). I am very happy to be able to hunt there again ! Shadefully the situation is not that good currently ... Because of that i didnt find that much. "Only" two teeth and some belemnites. I want to show you one of the teeth in this topic because i am not sure which specimen it is. Its a long (1cm) and well preserved tooth but its very thin (0.15cm) and only slightly curved. Hope you can help me ... thanks
  12. I hope some of you may like this
  13. Lit.: Grimaldi, D.A., Junfeng, Z., Fraser, N.C., Rasnitsyn, A., 2005. Revision of the bizarre Mesozoic scorpionflies in the Pseudopolycentropodidae (Mecopteroidea). Insect Syst. Evol. 36, 443–458. Ren, D., Shih, C., Labandeira, C.C., 2010. New Jurassic pseudopolycentropodids from China (Insecta: Mecoptera). Acta Geol. Sinica 84, 22–30. Shih CK, Yang XG, Labandeira CC, Ren D (2011) A new long-proboscid genus of Pseudopolycentropodidae(Mecoptera) from the Middle Jurassic of China and its plant-host specializations. In: Shcherbakov DE, Engel MS, Sharkey MJ (Eds) Advances in the Systematics of Fossil and Modern Insects: Honouring Alexandr Rasnitsyn. ZooKeys 130: 281–297. doi: 10.3897/zookeys.130.1641
  14. Hi, opened this up and found this bone inside, ichthyosaurs are common in the Whitby area, anyone seen a similar shape and could ID it at all ? Thanks.
  15. From the album Fossil Collection

  16. Hi, out hunting today for a few hours, seem to have found another two verts to go with the other two we have found, also came across this specimen, what you guys/gals think ? Thanks.
  17. I just find some time to post some other finds from my last tour ... Besides this: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/72771-new-finds-from-mistelgau/#comment-766199 http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/72434-a-very-beautiful-quarry I was also in a quarry near Buttenheim (at the same day). As many of you know its a very famous quarry where you can find nice white ammonites (mostly Pleuroceras) from the lower Jurassic. I didnt spend much time there so my finds arent spectacular ... Here are some of them: The smaller ones: I think nearly all of them are Pleuroceras sp. ... And some detailed pictures: A nice 5 cm big one: Another smaller one (3 cm): A nice 6 cm big spinal
  18. After this post: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/72434-a-very-beautiful-quarry/#comment-762636 I want to show you other finds from the same day but from another quarry ! After my visit in Ludwag i spend two hours in a quarry near Mistelgau. I already posted a hunt there a while ago: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/69816-a-visit-in-mistelgau/#comment-732319 Sorry but i dont have in-situ pictures (it was simply too dark). However the quarry didnt change a lot I mostly found again small ammonites which come from the "Jurensismergel formation", so about 182.7 Ma till 174.1 Ma (Toarcian). Here is a picture of all finds: (Not spectacular ) Some detailed pictures of those ammonites: A nice 3.5 cm long Pleydellia sp.: Another Pleydellia from another perspective : The biggest one with a length of 5 cm: (Cotteswoldia ?) Two medium sized (3 cm) ammonites with a nice preservation. I think they are also Cotteswoldia ... And i want to show another nice find: This nice gastropod is one of the best Costatrochus i have found until now ! Its 1.5 cm long and well preserved .... Thanks for viewing ! Hope you enjoy
  19. From the album Nigel's album

  20. From the album Nigel's album

  21. From the album Nigel's album

    Bone traces above tooth were exposed by myself. Tooth was removed, cleaned and re-fixed by others.
  22. From the album Invertebrates

    Pseudopolycentropus daohugouensis ZHANG, 2005 Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation Daohugou Nei Mongol China Lit.: Grimaldi, D.A., Junfeng, Z., Fraser, N.C., Rasnitsyn, A., 2005. Revision of the bizarre Mesozoic scorpionflies in the Pseudopolycentropodidae (Mecopteroidea). Insect Syst. Evol. 36, 443–458. Ren, D., Shih, C., Labandeira, C.C., 2010. New Jurassic pseudopolycentropodids from China (Insecta: Mecoptera). Acta Geol. Sinica 84, 22–30. Shih CK, Yang XG, Labandeira CC, Ren D (2011) A new long-proboscid genus of Pseudopolycentropodidae (Mecoptera) from the Middle Jurassic of China and its plant-host specializations. In: Shcherbakov DE, Engel MS, Sharkey MJ (Eds) Advances in the Systematics of Fossil and Modern Insects: Honouring Alexandr Rasnitsyn. ZooKeys 130: 281–297. doi: 10.3897/zookeys.130.1641
  23. Lit.: Liu et al. (2011): Pronemouridae fam. nov. (Insecta: Plecoptera), the stem group of Nemouridae and Notonemouridae, from the Middle Jurassic of Inner Mongolia, China. Palaeontology, Vol. 54, Part 4, 2011, pp. 923–933.
  24. From the album Invertebrates

    Insect non det. Middle Jurassic Daohugou Nei Mongol China
  25. Hello! i have found this rock laying on the surface of a dry saharian river. It is a dark blue hard limestone with some fossils in it. This facies is known here as between upper oxfordian and lower Kimmerijian. I think it's a kind of coral. Is it really? i have put some "vaseline codex" on the rock to make it more bright. Sorry for my poor english. Site: Laghouat, Algeria, north africa.