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Found 885 results

  1. Crab Claw Switzerland?

    Hello, Went fossil hunting in a famous Swiss Jurassic Location, the quarry of Liesberg. While cracking some rocks found what seems to be a crab claw. Can anyone help me identifying it? I was not aware such fossils could be found there, is it common or rather rare? Thank you! Cheers, Romain
  2. Very small ammonite

    Hello all I was wondering if any of you could identify this very tiny (1mm) ammonite sitting on top of some Dactylioceras athleticum from the Jurassic of Schlaifhausen, Germany. Can this be a juvenile stage of the same species? I know nothing about the different lifestages of ammonites. Looking forward to your answers. Edit: does someone knows the size of the smallest ammonite recorded?
  3. Rhizostomites admirandus Häckel, 1866

    From the album Invertebrates

    Rhizostomites admirandus Häckel, 1866 Upper Jurassic Lower Tithonian Solnhofen Germany
  4. Dinosaur fossils from the mid Jurassic are generally rare but the Isle of Skye in Scotland has revealed fossils sites preserving around 50 footprints on ancient coastal mudflats. The footprints suggest that Stegosaurs and possible ancient cousins of duck billed dinosaurs were living in the Isle of Skye around 170mya along with large Sauropods & Carnivores, suggesting a high diversity of dinosaurs from the mid Jurassic in Scotland. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/03/200311140536.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Ffossils_ruins%2Fpaleontology+(Paleontology+News+--+ScienceDaily) The Journal article is listed below and is open access https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0229640 1. dePolo PE, Brusatte SL, Challands TJ, Foffa D, Wilkinson M, Clark NDL, et al. Novel track morphotypes from new tracksites indicate increased Middle Jurassic dinosaur diversity on the Isle of Skye, Scotland. PLOS ONE, 2020
  5. Help request! I am putting together a tool for judging rock age based on very crude, whole-rock, hand-sample observations of fossil faunas/floras -- the types of observations a child or beginner could successfully make. I view this as a complement to the very fine, species-level identifications commonly employed as index fossils for individual stages, biozones, etc. Attached is what I've got so far, but I can clearly use help with corals, mollusks, plants, vertebrates, ichnofossils, and the post-Paleozoic In the attached file, vibrant orange indicates times in earth history to commonly observe the item of interest; paler orange indicates times in earth history to less commonly observe the item of interest. White indicates very little to no practical probability of observing the item of interest. Please keep in mind that the listed indicators are things like “conspicuous horn corals,” purposefully declining to address rare encounters with groups of low preservation potential, low recognizability, etc. Got additions/amendments, especially for the groups mentioned above? Toss them in the comments below! Thank you..... https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1tVm_u6v573V4NACrdebb_1OsBEAz60dS1m4pCTckgyA
  6. Almost micro

    Hi everyone! Oxfordian again This time it's the turn of small shells from Peski Quarry, located some 80 km south-east of Moscow. It's something like the Moscow region's Jurassic gastropod heaven. For some geologic reasons, ammonites do not get preserved there while little gastropods and bivalves do. It's also the only place dinosaurs were found in the Moscow region. As of today the continental sediments are depleted, but the marine ones are stil abundant. The quarry extracts Carboniferous limestone, removing Callovian marl and Oxfordian clay. The clay is then discharged in open piles - small shells of exceptional quality are washed up during rains. Below are pictures from two trips: one in winter (with snow) and one recently. To get to the Jurassic part of the quarry fastest you have to go through woods along a small river:
  7. Coprolite

    Hi everybody! These two are my second and third fossil collected in the wild, I'm 94% sure they are both coprolite......what kind? That's where my assuredness plummets. Both were found on the south side of the Isle of Wight on the beach at Brook Bay. I was there in late November of last year and did nighttime search using a UV flashlight. There were some brutal gale force winds, so I was only able to muster enough manliness for 20 minutes on the beach, I made a few discoveries, but these two are choice. I located the lighter coloured one because of uneven fluorescence and located a surface bone fragment, and the dark one because of it's deep purpl-ish glow and unique shape. The lighter one I believe is a crocodylian coprolite, the other I'm sure is coprolite but have no idea if it's from a mammal, dino or something else. Any shared wisdom would be greatly appreciated. Thanks :-D
  8. Tooth?

    Hello! If anyone could help me out with this it would be appreciated. This opal replacement fossil was mined in New South Wales, about 6 years ago. I found it in a parcel of Lightning Ridge rough and have been trying to identify it for a while now. The closest I have come to a positive match (Still not a match but it's close) is the Molar of a giant Marsupial from the order Diprotodontia. There is a wee problem with this, I've read Lightning Ridge Opal is supposed to be from the Cretaceous and Jurassic periods, a minimum of 66 million years old. The Diprotodontia existed throughout most of the Pleistocene, about 63 million years off. HELP! Thanks in advance everybody. :-)
  9. New paper with many specimens collected by GEAL - Museu da Lourinhã over the years. https://www.app.pan.pl/article/item/app006612019.html?fbclid=IwAR09IwGaqSwSJaxMS0BGbz3CVFUMxbq0yAzrC5QSwypxm-xrMeccQFQCrhk
  10. Hi, Is this real petrified wood? Never seen blue in wood before? I also haven’t seen any petrified wood faked. Seller seems legit and the information he/she provided about age and area check out. Any help appreciated. Travis
  11. New paper providing us more info on the Ornithopods of the Lourinhã Formation Abstract: Ornithopods are one of the most speciose group of herbivorous dinosaurs, rising during the Jurassic and getting extinct at the Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary. However, most of the attention has been given to derived forms (hadrosaurids). Herein, cranial and post-cranial ornithopod material from the Upper Jurassic Lourinhã Formation and housed at Museu da Lourinhã is described and discussed. http://app.pan.pl/article/item/app006612019.html
  12. When it comes to identification of theropod teeth Christophe Hendrickx and Philip J. Currie are the best without question. Here is a excellent paper that looks at Dental anatomy of the Jurassic Chinese apex predator Sinraptor dongi an Allosauroidea. https://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10.1139/cjes-2019-0231#.Xlz7qxZlVgh.twitter I'm aware that these teeth are almost non-existent in the open market but the information here can translate to other allosauroids from Europe or North America All the ratio's are shown as well as denticle density for most tooth positions
  13. found in the YP formation(early Mid-Jurrasic or late Early-Juranssic ) of the west mountains in Beijing China. Other fossils commonly found are Elatocladus (Machuria) , Baiera, Coniopteris, Czekanowskiales, Cladophlebis what could it be? the finest mark in 1mm
  14. Unknown Oyster, Madagascar

    Hey everyone! I recently acquired this oyster from Tulear province, Madagascar. The seller has listed it as Rastellum carinatum, but doing any research online, I’ve only found other sellers selling similar fossils. I did come across a Wikipedia article for Agerostrea sp. It appears to be the same shell, and it lists it as occurring in rocks that are Maastrichtian age from Madagascar. Are these the same species just under different names or are they separate? If so, what genus does my specimen belong too? Any response would be greatly appreciated from you guys, we’ll see how challenging this might be to figure out. Thanks again -Nick
  15. JURASSIC LEAVES

    found some bizaare leaves in the YP formation(early Mid-Jurrasic or late Early-Juranssic ) of the west mountains in Beijing China. looks like palms. Any clues? the finest mark in pic is 1mm.
  16. Hi all! A bit of development to the Frozen fossils topic. It's the same Moskva river Bronnitsy Oxfordian, but some 5km upstream, where you can find a bit younger layer of Amoeboceras serratum ammonites (earlier it was Amoeboceras alternoides layer/zone). The difference is mainly in the keel, it's less pronounced. The layer is accessible only in winter. Dont expect it to be breathtaking, the preservation is unfortunately worse and the fossils are more scarce. The shore:
  17. Mesturus verrucosus WAGNER, 1863

    From the album Vertebrates

    Mesturus verrucosus WAGNER, 1863 Late Jurassic Kimmeridgian Painten Rygol quarry Bavaria Germany Length 8.5cm Quite rare juvenile fish.
  18. An interesting article that discusses the “Golden Age” of sauropods, the Morrison Formation is reported to have yielded 13 genera and 24 species of sauropods. For collectors makes identification of teeth a pretty daunting task... Paper. https://giw.utahgeology.org/giw/index.php/GIW/article/view/42
  19. Ammonite ID

    Hello. I have this large black ammonite acquired from a man who lived in Brazil. Supposedly this ammo is from Peru, but I do not know any other info on it. There are so many ammo types it makes ones head spin trying to identify the details. Any help here would be appreciated. Thanks!
  20. Prep intro for a beginner

    Ive always enjoyed fossil hunting in local areas however I've never done any prep. work at all to specimes I've brought home. I've two practice pieces singled out to experiment with. (If it goes horribly wrong nothing lost) One a random chunk of lias clay with some bivalves and the other one a little ammonite just peaking out of another lump of jurassic lias clay. The matrix isn't particularly soft or hard with either. I have no appropriate tools in my possession however I'm willing to buy some basic things which are necessary. Any advice would be appreciated.
  21. A new fossil hunt on the French coast this weekend. The winter storms from the past week battered the coastline and this resulted of course in a few really nice finds. This time we weren’t prospecting alone, but two friends who recently started to collect fossils tagged along . The Saturday morning we prospected the late Jurassic beaches, we started with a slow start, but we finally did find 3 really nice echinoids, and a big ( heavy ) ammonite. At noon we went to the 2nd spot with late cretaceous chalk ( Cenomanian), here the storms really did their work, the recent scree piles were completely washed out and loos fossiliferous boulders were scattered all around. I did found some quite nice ammonites ( Acanthoceras rhotomagense and Cunningtoniceras inerme ), but Natalie hit the jackpot with 2 terrific finds. First up she found a huge and complete nautilus ( Cymatoceras elegans ) only slightly weathered on the side from peeking out of the boulder. A little bit further she found a big turillites ( Hypoturillites tuberculatus) from 25cm, the best part was that it came out in one piece, those heteromorphs usually break in fragments if you try to remove them. On Saturday we went to some Kimmeridgian exposures, but the storm on that day made it really difficult to search and we had to go back to the car’s after a couple of hours due to the terrible weather. But we did find quite a few Aspidoceras sp. ammonites. the saturday morning: saturday afternoon: The stunning Cymatoceras the turillites: The haul from this weekend:
  22. madagascan bivalves

    I was wondering that the madagascan jurassic clams and cretaceous cockscomb oysters from my collection did not have a comprehensive label,I wanted to ask you what they were.. Here are a few photos online: https://www.google.com/search?q=madagascar+fossil+clam&sxsrf=ACYBGNSyt5RjY1qraJUr3kcrF1FSPuVtBg:1581930994833&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=q1GrCKB9r4EOpM%3A%2CRVLU8rvAwW_qDM%2C_&vet=1&usg=AI4_-kRLA3HGjyWBFynUylzJaveHH4B7QA&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwish4aYoNjnAhXIUN4KHZ2nCtkQ9QEwAHoECAoQHg#imgrc=oy8HBIbkpemGJM
  23. Hi all, I’m new here, hello. Whilst I’ve purchased the odd small fossil and gemstone etc I’m very much a novice so bear with me. I’ve come across this Mosasaur Jaw. I know these are widely faked so I’m already sceptical but wanted your expert opinions too. The seller says it is genuine and not composite. Pictures attached. My thoughts here, it’s all I’ve got! - It’s big, much bigger than most fakes that that are much smaller (read easier to distribute/post). - partially exploded, and a random shark tooth in the matrix too. - Some small, baby? Teeth seem to show under the main teeth but I’ve no idea if these are to be expected. look forward to your comments!
  24. An article describes some rare finds of non-pterodactyloid pterosaur footprints. It was thought that earlier Pterosaurs (long tailed Pterosaurs) were poor walkers since footprints of these early Pterosaurs were rarely found compared to some later Pterosaur. However these new discoveries have shown that the earlier Pterosaurs were quadruple and had five toes on their hind feet (compared to four for the later Pterosaurs), and the researchers believe that this is evidence that they were also good walkers and not clumsy on the ground. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/footprint-find-could-be-a-holy-grail-of-pterosaur-research/
  25. Lower Callovian, Bov Fm, NW Bulgaria

    Hello everybody! After a week of snow, saw sun for three days and decided its a good idea to visit a honey spot. Sadly, the sun was deceiving, the snow has not yet melted. Actually it was about 20-50cm. This location is very special to me because: i) Its 30mins from home, which means I can visit again and again. ii) According to the scientific researches I managed to gather, it has an extreme variety of fossils and exposed outcrops, dating from the WHOLE Mesozoic era. iii) Furthermore, all researches state that it bears excellently preserved fossils of ammonites, belemnites and brachipods. Of the last two, I do not have even purchased samples. PBDB has nothing published for this place. There are places around with some information and findings but it is not the perfect places. I managed to put together 5 different researches so I have narrowed down my possible locations. The last one, which actually gave away the location with coordinates is here: With a first glance I do not see much exposed outcrops, but the existance of a creek is a good sign to have caused erosion. Click here for the location through google earth. My other lead comes again from the same professor. The previous research was isotopic while this one studies only the distribution of ammonites and bivalves during the Toarcian in that specific section. Through this map, I conclude that following the small river you should see Aalenian to Callovian, on the small hill NNW of the river is the upper part of the Jurassic and the beginning of Cretaceous. East and following the course of that small river, you may be able to see exposures of Triassic. Last picture shows what I have put together and my possible places I will visit. I) The sections marked with yellow next to the main road cutting represent this description: It is an exposure of the Ozirovo Formation which is composed mainly of Fe-ooidal limestones and rare ferruginized marls, having a total thickness of 3.25 m. I will not check those places as I would prefer to avoid curious eyes and questions like what are you doing here. II) Marker with coordinates after Dr. Metodiev and his isotopic research on belemnites. On google Earth doesnt look promising, hope I am proven wrong. III) With light blue I depict the area which seems most interesting to me. IV) Orange triangle is possible location for Triassic exposure. V) Purple is the road I followed today. Line with car and dots on foot. I spotted some rocks, definately CaCO3. No sign of fossils. Almost everything was covered with snow. I will visit it again next week, weather permitting. Meanwhile, I would like to hear your comments concerning the locations I mark. What other spot looks good to check? Do I miss something? Findings, pictures and the rest will continue on the same topic of course. Thank you everyone for reading until here, sorry for the long post! ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sources: GEOLOGICA BALCANICA, 36. 3—4, Sofia, Decemb. 2007, p. 91—96. Documentation and correlation of transgressive-regressive cycles from three Lower-Middle Jurassic successions of the Western Balkan Mts, Bulgaria Elena Koleva-Rekalova, Lubomir Metodiev, Daria Ivanova Geological Institute, Sofia Biostratigrapy of the Toarcian in the section at the village of Beledie Han (Western Balkan Mts), Bulgaria L. Metodiev, D. Ivanova, E. Koleva-Rekalova Trans-border (south-eastern Serbia/south-western Bulgaria) correlations of the Jurassic sediments: the Getic and Supra-Getic units PLATON TCHOUMATCHENCO , DRAGOMAN RABRENOVIC , VLADAN RADULOVIC , NENAD MALESHEVIC & BARBARA RADULOVIC Geological Institute, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences Stable isotope records (d18O and d13C) of Lower-Middle Jurassic belemnites from the Western Balkan mountains (Bulgaria): Palaeoenvironmental application Lubomir Metodiev *, Elena Koleva-Rekalova
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