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Found 931 results

  1. A ‘Jurassic Park’ icon was so much different in real life, BRG_Com https://bgr.com/2020/07/08/dilophosaurus-jurassic-park-study/ Famous Jurassic Park Dinosaur Was More Powerful than Previously Thought, Sci News, July 9, 2020 http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/dilophosaurus-wetherilli-08620.html The paper is: Marsh, A., & Rowe, T. (2020). A comprehensive anatomical and phylogenetic evaluation of Dilophosaurus wetherilli (Dinosauria, Theropoda) with descriptions of new specimens from the Kayenta Formation of northern Arizona. Journal of Paleontology, 94(S78), 1-103. doi:10.1017/jpa.2020.14 https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-paleontology/article/comprehensive-anatomical-and-phylogenetic-evaluation-of-dilophosaurus-wetherilli-dinosauria-theropoda-with-descriptions-of-new-specimens-from-the-kayenta-formation-of-northern-arizona/39C2921EDC6E951AC9F94A22158CA4E5 Yours, Paul H.
  2. Marine reptile tooth ID Lyme Regis

    Hi all, Bought this tooth online a while back. It was sold to me as "Ichthyosaurus platyodon" (which I understand to mean Temnodontosaurus platyodon) from Lyme Regis. Likely found by the seller themselves, as I know they occasionally collect fossils there. However, for the following reasons, I'm not sure about this attribution: Overall, the tooth doesn't look like your typical ichthyosaur tooth to me: It has more of an oval rather than round cross-section It's labolingually flattened Messial and distal carinae run the full length of the crown and divide the tooth into labial and lingual parts While fine striations can be seen on one side of the tooth (presumably the lingual side), the other side (which would be the labial) seems entirely smooth - though some traces of rare striations can be seen on the photographs The striations are much more similar to those of crocodile or pliosaur teeth than to the plicidentine condition so typical of ichthyosaurs The horizontal banding on the tooth surface is unfamiliar to me with respect to most marine reptile teeth I have seen, but occurs much more frequently on crocodile teeth of various species I also bought another tooth with the same attribution from the seller, more or less around the same time. This one has no striations whatsoever, has a more rounded base, is less flattened and has a more rounded tip. It also has carinae. I therefore reclassified it as a probable Goniopholis sp. crocodile tooth. Now I know that not having the root makes it more difficult to identify this particular specimen, but I was hoping someone on this forum might be able to help me, as currently it goes without label. I've considered crocodile, plesiosaur and even pliosaur, but all of these have some reservations that prevent final classification. For one, none of these groups have teeth that are typically flattened like this, nor do plesiosaurs (sensu lato, thus including pliosaurs) have carinae. Crocodiles, then again, would either have or not have striations all around the tooth. And what to make of the banding: is this just preservational, or does it reflect the internal structure of the tooth - i.e. outcome of the tooth's ontological growth? Tooth measures 18 mm and is missing the tip. Thanks in advance for your help!
  3. Whitby finds

    Fairly slim pickings today but we picked these up and don’t see so many of them. Any ideas on the bivalve? Is the ammonite Pleuroceras Solare ? Thanks for looking
  4. Sauropod jaw section?

    Being sold as sauropod camarasaur jaw section. From Muffat County, Colorado. 48 x 51mm. Thanks for the help
  5. https://academic.oup.com/zoolinnean/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/zoolinnean/zlaa054/5861188?redirectedFrom=fulltext
  6. Whitby Coprolites

    We’ve seen a few of these things before in shale type rocks at Whitby, could they be coprolites? A couple of other finds from today too; a belemnite with pyrite phragmocone and a nice ammonite that I split
  7. Jurassic toe claw

    Bony core present. Much of keratin sheath preserved as creamy green. Bottom has distinct flattened profile and the keratin is heavily fractured (see picture - toe2 left edge, toe3 right edge) Top profile exhibits clockwise curve. Jurassic, Morrison, Four Corners.
  8. Joyce, W.G. and Mäuser, M., 2020. New material of named fossil turtles from the Late Jurassic (late Kimmeridgian) of Wattendorf, Germany. Plos one, 15(6), p.e0233483.doi: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0233483 https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0233483 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/341884475_New_material_of_named_fossil_turtles_from_the_Late_Jurassic_late_Kimmeridgian_of_Wattendorf_Germany https://plos.figshare.com/articles/NKMB_Watt09_162_i_Tropidemys_seebachi_i_late_Kimmeridgian_of_Wattendorf_Germany_/12419039 PDF: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/file?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0233483&type=printable Fürsich, F.T., Mäuser, M., Schneider, S. and Werner, W., 2007. The Wattendorf Plattenkalk (Upper Kimmeridgian)–a new conservation lagerstätte from the northern Franconian Alb, southern Germany. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie-Abhandlungen, 245(1), pp.45-58. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/249518036_The_Wattendorf_Plattenkalk_Upper_Kimmeridgian_-_a_new_conservation_lagerstatte_from_the_northern_Franconian_Alb_southern_Germany Chellouche, P., Fürsich, F.T. and Mäuser, M., 2012. Taphonomy of neopterygian fishes from the Upper Kimmeridgian Wattendorf Plattenkalk of Southern Germany. Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, 92(1), pp.99-117. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/257920454_Taphonomy_of_neopterygian_fishes_from_the_Upper_Kimmeridgian_Wattendorf_Plattenkalk_of_Southern_Germany Yours, Paul H.
  9. Two very tiny fossils.

    Hello, these tiny fossils were difficult to photograph, I had to improvise by sellotaping a magnifier to the camera lens, as I do not have anything that can do the equivalent where I am now. I was wondering if one of them is possibly a bit of crinoid? The circular bit seemed to remind me of modern bone. Sorry they are muddy, I'd probably break them if I tried to wash them. Scale is in centimetres, and they were found in Northamptonshire, UK, which is Jurassic. Thanks.
  10. Very large seed?

    This is an un-associated surface find from Brushy Basin so no context to draw on. No discernible internal structure when looking at the fractured end. Obvious symmetry and taper to a flat point. I have not found anything seed-like on the internet that is this large or shaped quite like this. So I am excited to hear back from the forum. I am new to the Fossil Forum and look forward to sharing in the bigger brain of paleontology.
  11. unknown shell

    I find the ribbing of this shell peculiar. Do you recognize this taxon? Oxfordian of Poland. Associated finds include: sponges, brachiopods & bivalves.
  12. Unknown Russian echinoid

    What do you think it is? The definition I got on the local forum is "conditionally classified as Plegiocidaris" Guides/handbooks on Moscow Mezozoic (unfortunately mostly outdated) list 5 genera: Echinobrissus, Rhabdocidaris, Acrocidaris, Holectypus and Cidaris. For this and neighboring stratigraphic zones Echinobrissus and Rhabdocidaris only, mainly the latter. Both are defined by spines, sometimes isolated plates
  13. Fossil bone?

    Hello everyone. I found this sticking out of a mudflat on the River Humber Estuary, UK. It seems to be a fossilised bone of something but I could be wrong. I gave it a wash and the water ran through one hole at the side and came out of the hole at the other side. Just wondered if anyone had an inkling what it could be? Thank you
  14. Hello there fossil forum! A few of you may have read my post about my 2 trips to Bornholm, a Danish island that holds a lot of different fossiliferous geological layers. I had specifically been digging by a location called "Hasle beach", where mid-jurassic sandstone layers are present. There have been found a few plesiosaur bones/teeth there, as well as 2 possible dinosaur bones, still being described, and also a few footprints. Other than that, mostly what you will find here, is shells, and occasionally hybodont shark teeth. As I mentioned in my last post about Bornholm (you can read it here), I found a ratfish/chimaera tooth together with the drummer from my heavy metal band. Our guitarist and bassist were nearby, as me and the drummer sat in one spot, opening several large eroded sandstones together, when suddenly a small black lump was visible within the orange sandstone. It turned out to be a chimaera tooth. When we were done digging for the 7 days we were there, we handed some of the stuff over to the museum on the island to check it out. I took the chimaera tooth with me home. About 1 and a half month later, a renowned Danish paleontologist made a lecture/presentation about dinosaur finds on Greenland. In between one of the breaks in his presentation, I got to talk to him, and I had taken some of my finds from Bornholm with me, including some plesiosaur bones, and the chimaera tooth. He took some of the stuff with him, to examine closer. He sent some of the bones back last month, saying it was some partial vertebrae fragments, which wouldn't be of interest to the geological institute. However, the chimaera tooth was interesting, as it was unlike other chimaera teeth found at the location. Today I just got an email from the paleontologist, that the tooth is in fact from a new species, and will be included in a scientific article about chimaera-fauna in the Hasle-formation! It has officially been declared "Danekræ", which is a title all "scientifically important" fossil-finds are given. It becomes state-property, and the finder/finders of the fossil are rewarded with some cash, as well as the honors of having their name attached to the find!
  15. Mesozoic unknown

    Dear TFF-members, Can anyone help me identify the fossils in the photographs below? I have trouble identifying the concentric patterns that are visible on these (apparently hollow?) shell-like fragments. They were found in the Pyrenees, Spain. The formation in which they were found is Mesozoic in age, most likely Jurassic. Note these are outcrop photographs, so I cannot make additional images to aid identification, unfortunately. Thanks for any feedback you may be able to provide. Kind regards, Tim
  16. Allosaurus tooth

    Hello, I saw this for sale and tempted by it, but is it Allo? Seems pretty small to me. And, is it complete? The base seems crooked, so wondering if it may be half a tooth? Labelled as complete but repaired crack. From Morrison Formation. Thanks
  17. Klamelisaurus redescribed

    A new sauropod-related paper is available online: Andrew J. Moore, Paul Upchurch, Paul M. Barrett, James M. Clark & Xu Xing (2020) Osteology of Klamelisaurus gobiensis (Dinosauria, Eusauropoda) and the evolutionary history of Middle–Late Jurassic Chinese sauropods. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology DOI: 10.1080/14772019.2020.1759706 The Middle-Late Jurassic eusauropod fauna of the Sichuan basin and a few other areas in China has been ripe for taxonomic revision, and Moore et al. (2018, 2020) settle the question of potential synonymy of Klamelisaurus with Bellusaurus by demonstrating that these two genera are distinct taxa despite known Bellusaurus specimens being juvenile and Klamelisaurus specimens being adult. The recovery of Euhelopus outside Macronaria in some analyses in Moore et al. (2020) is likely to be greeted with skepticism because Euhelopus and kin have been recovered as basal members of the titanosauriform clade Somphospondyli in cladistic analyses in the past 15 years. Also note that since Klamelisaurus is recovered as a mamenchisaurid, Klamelisaurinae Zhao, 1993 becomes a synonym of Mamenchisauridae, although if future cladistic analysis finds some mamenchisaurids to be closer to Klamelisaurus than to Mamenchisaurus or Omeisaurus, then Klamelisaurinae could be used to encompass Klamelisaurus and any mamenchisaurid closely related to it. By the way, could anyone send me a copy of the above-mentioned paper, just for convenience?
  18. Morrison Formation yields remains of predatory insect. Utah State Parks Blog, Vernal, Utah https://stateparks.utah.gov/2020/05/20/famous-dinosaur-producing-rocks-in-utah-yield-fossil-of-large-predatory-insect/ Jurassic bug: Researchers find 151-million-year-old Morrisonnepa Jurassica insect fossil in Utah by Jordan Culver, USA TODAY, May 22, 2020 https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2020/05/21/morrisonnepa-jurassica-151-million-year-old-bug-fossil-utah/5234187002/ the paper is: Lara, M.B., Foster, J.R., Kirkland, J.I. and Howells, T.F., 2020. First fossil true water bugs (Heteroptera, Nepomorpha) from Upper Jurassic strata of North America (Morrison Formation, southeastern Utah). Historical Biology, pp.1-9. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/08912963.2020.1755283 Yours, Paul H.
  19. Mystery Yorkshire Fish

    Hello Everyone, I found this eroded partial nodule while on a fossil hunt at Runswick Bay last year. I think it contains part of a fish but I'm not sure of the type. I've had a look at some other Yorkshire fish material, primarily Gyrosteus, but haven't seen anything like it yet. Most of the Gyrosteus material seems to be much bigger then whats in this block. I was wondering if anyone could help me identify what it is, I think I have sections of fin as well as possibly a cluster of ribs eroding out of the block. I've also included an annotated image of the front and back since the material is very difficult to pick out in pictures. I'm sure I have missed a few bits but I drew in everything I can see. Also, is there any way to prep this sort of material? The block is full of calcite veining so I assume manual preparation is near impossible, certainly well beyond my beginner abilities. Any and all information you can give me is greatly appreciated. Thank you, Benton
  20. Hello! As soon as lockdown is over, my friend and I are planning a fossil trip, most likely to the Jurassic coast. Now, we've done Charmouth, Lyme Regis to death. Can anybody recommend any other good locations for finding reptile bits? The find rates don't need to be as high, but it would be nice to try somewhere new
  21. Mcmaker's showcase

    Hello everyone. I wanted to share with you my fossils collection. I started fossils hunting in my area back in the june 2019 and that's what I collected and preparated since then. First of all, my favourite belemnites. I donated one of the largest rostrum (7 intact inches, on the second photo) to the Jurassic Museum in my country, feels good So, let's get started, that's one of twelve full shelves, this one is especially for belemnites
  22. I was wondering if there are any permian to cretaceous reptile/amphibian fossils that even an newbie like me can acquire without having to dig or pay a huge price for,I looked for permian and triassic stuff and it is really hard to find such things Are barasaurus legal to buy?
  23. UK Marine Reptile Teeth

    Hello all, I've had two teeth in my collection for many years now. I've recently moved and lost the supplied ID labels that came with them. I've taken this as a nice opportunity to see what others may think they are. I believe if memory serves me right the large tooth (Tooth A in photos) was labeled as a Simolestes. Then the smaller tooth tip (Tooth B in photos) labeled as Liopleurodon. I know both were found in the Wicklesham pit in Faringdon, Oxfordshire, UK. Upon some research, I found an article from 2014 with a Dakosaurus tooth discovered to be the largest in the UK at the time. This tooth bears some resemblance to tooth A but I'm unsure. I've attached a link to the article below. Tooth B has been worn down but still presents with grooves in the enamel. I have also labeled each photo to allow for easier identification when talking about it (Hope this helps!). Im excited to hear what others think. Thanks for reading Link to articles on Dakosaurus- http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/science-tooth-fossil-dakosaurus-maximus-01954.html
  24. From the album Brachiopodes, Shells, corals, sponges......

    Zeilleria Humeralis Kimméridgian pointe du Chay , Angoulins, près de La Rochelle (Charente Maritime).France
  25. Collection

    Hi all, after seeing all these nice collections from other members I also want to share the collection of my father and I with you. The collections is of various time periods and sites. We started collecting in 2009 close to home in a quarry nearby Maastricht called 't Rooth (sadly this quarry is close for visitors since 2016). From there on we started visiting other quarries and the collection started too grew massively. We frequently visited the ENCI, Winterswijk and Solnhofen. I will start off with some of the display cabinets
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