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Found 128 results

  1. Cardabiodon

    Attempting to use phone again. Found a nice cardabiodon today. A little water warn along the edges but pretty nice.
  2. Curious what this is

  3. Saurocephalus or Saurodon?

    I have a jaw I'm considering and it's labeled as Saurocephalus lanciformis. But after doing some research I found Saurodon to be almost the same fish. What would be the best way to label this jaw?
  4. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral - Kansas, USA Kansas, USA Fossil Coral In Matrix Stone From Kansas USA 146 Grams. This is an in interesting specimen fossil coral in matrix stone found near the Kansas River. This stone was found in a glacial alluvial till sand bar area near the river. This stone weighs 146 grams and measures about 70mm by 50mm by 29mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  5. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral - Kansas, USA Kansas, USA Fossil Coral In Matrix Stone From Kansas USA 146 Grams. This is an in interesting specimen fossil coral in matrix stone found near the Kansas River. This stone was found in a glacial alluvial till sand bar area near the river. This stone weighs 146 grams and measures about 70mm by 50mm by 29mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  6. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral - Kansas, USA Kansas, USA Fossil Coral In Matrix Stone From Kansas USA 146 Grams. This is an in interesting specimen fossil coral in matrix stone found near the Kansas River. This stone was found in a glacial alluvial till sand bar area near the river. This stone weighs 146 grams and measures about 70mm by 50mm by 29mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  7. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral - Kansas, USA Kansas, USA Fossil Coral In Matrix Stone From Kansas USA 146 Grams. This is an in interesting specimen fossil coral in matrix stone found near the Kansas River. This stone was found in a glacial alluvial till sand bar area near the river. This stone weighs 146 grams and measures about 70mm by 50mm by 29mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  8. I found this on hilltop in Wreford Formation. I've never seen this before and at first I thought it was Acanthocladia. It's not. Has anyone seen this type before? Lower Permian, Wreford formation, Kansas. 904 bryozoan.bmp
  9. Newbie needing an ID

    Hello everyone, I’m a newbie to fossil hunting. I found this yesterday, my first time out since taking up this hobby. I found it along a creek in Shawnee, Kansas, USA. Some of the rock in the area had clearly been trucked in and some was from the area so I don’t know how this particular fossil arrived at the location. The fossil is about 28 mm in diameter. There are clear pores that are on the outside surface. Where it is broken, you can see the pores extending inside the specimen. My first thought is a coral or some kind but I’m not sure what kind. Any ideas? If you need any information, let me know.
  10. Petrified Wood. ID help and discussion.

    Over the past couple weeks I have seemed to find multiple variations of petrified wood. In this picture the top few pieces were all found in the same area and some of the smaller pieces that I found have little crystals throughout them (like the one in the top of this image). The piece I found on the bottom confuses me because it resembles wood but also has a mineral/rock look to it. I have read into agatized petrified wood but I still don't know much about that process. In the past I have found very large pieces of what I believed to be petrified wood but the majority of the piece resembled a crystal. Unfortunately I don't have those with me but will post a picture of them when I get home. Any info and help on the subject would be appreciated. Also sorry the picture posted weird. When i refer to the top I mean the right side of the image. Thanks, Nic
  11. Recent Publication on 2014 Ichthyornis

    Great article by John Pickrell of National Geographic about a new publication in the journal Nature on a specimen I discovered and donated in 2014: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/05/fossil-bird-skull-3d-dinosaurs-evolution-paleontology-science/ I was out hunting the chalk with a friend on the Sunday before I would start school at Fort Hays State when I found the specimen in this paper. I didn’t immediately recognize the bones as those from a bird. However, I did see how the bones weathered differently than most fish bones do. I decided to cut out a medium slab of chalk and take it back to my dorm room so I could prepare the bones in a better work place with better tools. At that point I still wasn’t entirely sure what I had, but the more I looked at the few exposed bones, the more excited I got. Back in my dorm room, I used a soft brush and small amounts of water to carefully expose the shape of each bone. I really got excited as the complete sternum, coracoid and jaw elements came into view! The specimen was discovered August 17 2014, which is almost four years ago now! I also met with Dr. Laura Wilson the next day (my first day of college) and I agreed to donate the specimen to the Sternberg Museum in Hays. The specimen was first scanned at the Hays Medical Center and we then began to map the bones to get an idea of how much of the specimen was present. During this same time I had reached out to Dr. Dave Burnham at the University of Kansas. Dave then sent pictures to Daniel Field who, along with others researchers from Yale and elsewhere, would perform additional scanning and create a fantastic 3-D model of the skull. The article does an excellent job covering the history of Ichthyornis discoveries and the importance of this genus. Here is the list of authors: Department of Geology & Geophysics and Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA Daniel J. Field, Michael Hanson & Bhart-Anjan S. Bhullar Biodiversity Institute and Natural History Museum, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA David Burnham & Kristopher Super Sternberg Museum of Natural History and Department of Geosciences, Fort Hays State University, Hays, KS, USA Laura E. Wilson & Kristopher Super Alabama Museum of Natural History, Tuscaloosa, AL, USA Dana Ehret McWane Science Center, Birmingham, AL, USA Jun A. Ebersole Department of Biology & Biochemistry, Milner Centre for Evolution, University of Bath, Bath, UK Daniel J. Field Link to the paper in Nature: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0053-y
  12. A new paper just published in Nature describes the first complete skull of the Cretaceous bird Ichthyornis, and how it illustrates the evolution of the head of modern birds. News story here. Also NPR story here. Nature article here for those who have access. The fossil is so delicate it remains encased in a block of chalk. The fossil was "prepped" via CT scan which revealed the most minute details. Don
  13. My own "museum"

    I wanted to wait for my "Shop" to be completely done before showing it here. Due to the fact that my oldest child will be graduating high school next month, and my shop will soon be turned in to a graduation party area I have decided to go ahead and show it unfinished. I have always loved science museums, so I decided to just make my own in my own yard. Last summer I put up a 30X50 "pole barn", put in a wood floor and walls, and now I have my own museum. Almost everything in here was collected by myself or my family. This collection is 90% Kansas stuff, but the last photo of the rikers and the glass case is what I call my "exotic" section. All of the stuff there is from other states that I either found myself, or with the aid of fellow Fossil Forum members. (A bunch of my Texas stuff is from the Waco trip that a lot of members went on many years ago.) There is also a prep room with a window (just like all the cool museums) in the corner. Its already a mess, but I hope to keep the mess confined to that area! I still have some work to do, and I doubt it will ever be completely done, but if any of you ever find yourself driving across Kansas I'm only about 20 minutes off of I-70, and if I'm home, you are welcome to stop by. I may even point you to a spot or two where you can find some of your own fossils around here.
  14. I don't know if any of you caught this article in Eurekalert or elsewhere. A Niobrara formation fossil found 70 years ago was studied by isolated experts over time. It was first identified as an algae, then a cephalopod, and now as a cartilaginous fish! Ah, the Internet makes it so much easier now... https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-04/amon-faa041618.php
  15. Help ID please!!!

    Fossil hunting with my daughter in south West Kansas out back of our home. it was the 97th time I told her thats just a rock a sweetheart. (She just turned 4). Only this time I wasn't just a rock. it's tooth of some kind. It just became our best find!!!! If someone has some ideas from what we would love to hear them thanks.
  16. Possible Xenacanth Tooth?

    Hello, I found this tooth in my kid’s sandbox in central Kansas. A nearby natural history museum suggested it might be a xenacanth tooth from Pennsylvania period. Just wanted to see if anybody else has any ideas about it. Thanks!
  17. Is there an active fossil club in the Kansas City area?
  18. Tylosaurus proriger tooth

    From the album Reptiles

    Tylosaurus proriger Found in the North Sulphur River, Ozan Formation Dated Campanian Stage of Cretaceous (≈80 mya) Measures 4.4 cm (1.7 inches)
  19. The stratigraphic nomenclature for Kansas has been formally revised. The result is lots of changes to the nomenclature made to acknowledge serious problems with five stage glacial model. Layzell, A.L., Sawin, R. S., Mandel, R. D., Ludvigson, G. A., Franseen, E. K., West, R. R., and Watney, W. L., 2017, Quaternary Stratigraphy and Stratigraphic Nomenclature Revisions in Kansas; in, Current Research in Earth Sciences: Kansas Geological Survey, Bulletin 263, 6 p. http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Current/2017/Layzell/index.html http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Current/2017/Layzell/Bulletin263.pdf http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Current/contents.html https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Greg_Ludvigson Yours, Paul H.
  20. Smoky Hill Chalk

    Hello everyone, It's the Amateur Paleontologist. In about a year and a half, I will be going for a few weeks to Kansas, and I am focused on collecting fossils from the Smoky Hill Chalk. I was wondering whether some people could give me a few details (GPS coordinates, landowner contact information...) about various Smoky Hill Chalk sites where vertebrate fossils (in particular reptile remains...) can be encountered relatively commonly. Many thanks for your help. Best wishes, Christian.
  21. Kansas Bone Fossil

    Found in Greenwood county Kansas area, not sure if bone fragment or part of jaw fragment, found in area where previously found Shark teeth. Any ideas from the group what this fragment is?
  22. palm tree bark?

    I found this in a creek, eastern edge Flint Hills, Greenwood County, Kansas. The creek is in and drains through the Early Permian. Formation is unknown. It must be tree bark and I'm guessing some kind of palm because of the leaf scar. It curves only slightly so I would also guess it's from a large tree. I took a file to bottom of leaf scar and there are only faint lines revealed. This appears to be a sandstone and has tiny sparkly bits in it.
  23. Help with Cretaceous Sea Piece

    Hi all, I was inspecting some of my Smoky Hill Chalk finds when I stumbled across this. It is inside/on a partial Inoceramid, most likely Volviceramus grandis. This was all in the Smoky Hill Chalk, Late Cretaceous. Thanks for any suggestions!
  24. Squalicorax ???

    I have recently purchased an associated Squalicorax tooth set from Gove county, Kansas. It is Coniacian in age. However, I have no idea what species it is. These teeth are too gracile for S. falcatus and S. baharijensis. Looks a little bit like S. volgensis, however teeth are too large for it. Any help will be very appreciated.
  25. I have been finding a lot of inclusions in a batch of coprolites from the Smoky Hill Chalk that assumed were bits of cartilage. One of the newer specimens from that batch had a piece of the material in question on the surface; enabling me to view it from the side. They look like little teeth, so now I don't know what I have. I have one other specimen that has a couple of the little tooth-like structures intact (one that I posted a while back that has possible Ptychodus tooth fragments). Is this skin with denticles, cartilage, a skull part or some sort of tooth plate? As always, any help is greatly appreciated.
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