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Found 48 results

  1. Diplomystus

    My latest completion. I like this one but still prefer the Mioplosus. I'm looking for a Priscacara next. Maybe Santa will bring me a fossil for Christmas!
  2. I still have about 30 more to finish preparing, but so far, here are the best two I have prepped from my 2019 Green River run:
  3. Mioplosus labracoides?

    I’m pretty sure this is a Mioplosus labracoides, but I would like some confirmation before I label and frame it. Found in Wyoming, green river formation.
  4. Coprolite fossil ID

    Found this “piece of snarge” fossil on a fossil trip in Kemmerer Wyoming.. Piece of snarge? Coprolite? It’s a pun, get it? Seriously though, they think it’s either crocodilian or turtle in origin. What do you guys think? Anyway to tell? it’s pretty cool. I’ve got lots of other fossils to share later.
  5. Belated 2019 Road Trip Fossils

    Last year, to celebrate finishing my undergraduate degree, my girlfriend and I went on a long (9,000+ mile) road trip around the western US and at long last (a little over a year since their discovery) the last of the fossils we found are out of the refrigerator and I’ve finally gotten all of them photographed. Here are some of the highlights and best fossils we found. A rough map of the route of the trip While the trip wasn’t entirely fossil centric we wanted to hunt at a few cool spots along the way. We chose to visit 5 fossil locations, the first of which was Clarkia Fossil Bowl in Idaho, a fantastic location for Miocene age leaves (Langhian Stage, ~15Mya) tucked behind a motocross track. These poor fossils have been through it all in the year between when they were found and when I finally got them dry. They’ve been soaked several times, gone mouldy twice, frozen at least once and flown across the Atlantic Ocean, all before spending the last 8 months in the refrigerator. Amazingly all but two of them survived perfectly including one of my favourite finds, a tiny flower. A maple leaf (genus Acer) still partly covered in matrix but with the stem intact. At some point I hope to get this one prepared. The best leaf find of the trip, with beautiful red coloration and mottling from fungus. A partial leaf, with beautiful vein preservation. The next spot was the American Fossil quarry in Kemmerer Wyoming to look for Eocene fish (Green River Formation, Ypresian Stage, ~53-48Mya). Splitting though the material left out by the quarry we found a few fish, primarily Knightia and Diplomystus. The best Knightia, including the best fish of the day with its head still partly covered. Some of the Diplomystus. The first needs some repair as it broke through the tail. The second has a counterpart as well and I’m hoping to frame it soon. And a mystery fish, I don’t know what species this is, it could just be Knightia or Diplomystus but it doesn’t look like the others we found. The star find came close to the end of the time at the quarry, a section of a puddle layer packed full of Knightia, at least a dozen fish piled on top of each other. The quarry manager was kind enough to let me take the blocks without splitting them thinner since the material is full of fractures and likely would not have survived. The layer as it split in the quarry (US size 13 hiking boot acting as a rough scale). The three pieces I managed to recover. The blocks are currently in a storage unit in Washington until I can figure out how to get them prepared. I am hoping the first two pieces can be reunited and the part and counterpart can be mounted side by side but I’m unsure about how to accomplish this. If anyone who prepares Green River fish has any ideas please let me know. The third locality we visited was Westgard pass in Inyo California, hunting for Cambrian archaeocyathids (Poleta Formation, Cambrian Stage 3, ~ 520Mya). We were only there a short time as there was a lot of driving to do that day, but I still managed to find one example in cross section. My girlfriend was more lucky, finding four examples. These are our favourites, particularly the third, which exhibits some dimensionality in addition to the cross-section. I’m absolutely thrilled to find anything Cambrian, and to make things even better the fossil locality is just down the road from the Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest, home to living trees more than 4,000 years old and one of my favourite spots on the whole trip. We also visited Capitola Beach to search for rolled cetacean bone. I found two examples with one clearly showing the cancellous internal bone texture. To cap off the trip I wanted to do a fossil hunt in my home state of Washington. Since I still don’t know where to go to look for the elusive Pulalius crab, we decided to search the West Twin River site for shrimp concretions (Pysht Fomration, Oligocene, ~22-33Mya). We found over a dozen of these containing partial shrimp. I think they are all Callianopsis clallamensis since this is a common species at this locality. The first concretion that I found after identifying the right material. Another shrimp nodule containing a large section of claw. The head of a shrimp. Two non-crustaceans, a gastropod internal mould and a beautiful white bivalve in a small concretion. A mystery concretion with something eroding out from both ends. And last, one of the strangest concretions I have ever seen. The outside is hardened but the inside is a soft clay consistency with several bits of shrimp shell, completely the opposite of the hard in the middle concretions I’m used to. In all, it was a fantastic trip. I would love to go back to all the sites we visited, and there is so much more to explore next time I’m stateside. I’m looking forward to getting out hunting again. Stay tuned for the next big trip to celebrate finishing our masters. Benton
  6. Green River Fish ID

    Here is a large partial fish I found a few weeks ago. Not sure, but suspecting maybe Phareodus?? Any thoughts? Thanks, Mike
  7. My wife and I went on a 7500+ mile ramble to break out of our COVID doldrums. Due to the virus we had to change up many of our original plans... which conversely added a number of additional fossil hunting locals as they allowed us to mostly avoid our fellow humans and maintain social distancing by many many miles. As part of our trip preparations my wife sewed us a number of masks, including a whole series of fossil hunting masks for me. Originally we were supposed to stay in Chicago, but we elected to avoid staying in the city, so we only got to do a drive by We started the trip with a bonus dig, meeting up with fellow forum member @minnbuckeye for a guided Ordovician hunt in Fennimore, Wisconsin (THANKS MIKE!) Unfortunately I neglected to take pics of the site so I will only be able to share a farm pic we passed on the way. Mike was a gracious host who kicked off the visit with a gift of several fossil samples from his home turf As with all of the fossils from this trip, all finds are as they arrived back home, no prep. Some of our finds from Fennimore:
  8. Heliobatis radians MARSH, 1877

    From the album Vertebrates

    Heliobatis radians MARSH, 1877 Eocene Ypresian Green River Formation Kemmerer Warfield Quarry Wyoming USA Length 45cm / 18"
  9. The Heck?

    So, was looking at my fossils, and I saw something that has me puzzled on one of them. Pictures are attached. Underneath the jaw of the fish there are what look like ribs to some other fish. I want a second opinion on this though. Thats not what has me puzzled, though. Whats puzzling me is next to the fossil, the x shaped thing in the picture. Any idea what these are in the pictures? I think the fish is a Phareodus, By the way. Jared
  10. 2 IDs

    A little back story. I went to Kemmerer, WY for a fossil hunting trip on August 12, 2019. The attached photo is a Phareodus I found. Today, I noticed something that looks like petrified wood near the lower jaw and on the Phareodus near the bottom. I said to myself, "It retained its shape, so it may be petrified wood." After a little digging, I discovered something else that was segmented and flat. Did not look like a spinal chord to me. Here are the two IDs. What is the segmented thing? What is the part next to it, Petrified Wood? Any help will be appreciated. Jared
  11. Muddy Wyoming Fish

    FYI @Ptychodus04 @Kittenmittens @mamlambo @Fossilis Willis @Malcolmt @DevonianDigger Well managed to get out last Friday to dig up some Green River fish from the split fish layers. These layers aren't nice and hard like the 18 inch, nor are the rarer fish as obtainable (they don't preserve as well), but you can still find some pretty cool stuff. A family next to me found a foot long Phareodus in perfect condition with a dark red color (forgot to take a picture of that). I don't think they realize just how lucky they are because those are not easy to find. The night before it rained a ton so I had a hard time getting to the quarry. The oily lime based rock wouldn't split properly until about noon but I hauled some decent Knightia's out. These aren't your prized, rare, fish but they are still a blast to dig up. Pulled out about fifty and worked all day. With all the mud and rain I seriously didn't think anyone would show up but Friday was very busy. About fifty in total came. The morning was tough. Lots of muddy rock to split and it just didn't want to split evenly. Everything would crumble on me. As you can see in the picture below things were muddy and wet. This Knightia has some pretty nice curves. Another curvaceous fossil. I'm in love. The split fish come in their varieties. Usually I only keep the ones that are completely filled in then put a sealant over them. This one looks alright considering it's a bit patchy. This one will be fun to prepare with my new CP9361 and some very careful handling of the scribe. This is one of my A grade Knightia's from the trip. Great color. The tail can be teased out a bit more. I really like how the vertebrae pop out in a 3D manner. Keep on fossiling!
  12. Amphiplaga brachyptera COPE, 1877

    From the album Vertebrates

    Amphiplaga brachyptera COPE, 1877 Middle Eocene Kemmerer Wyoming USA Length 8cm
  13. I am headed to Kemmerer with my son to look for fossils. I am aware of the quarries in Kemmerer and want to know if there is anything that we should not miss on our road trip or around the area. We have 5 days to explore. Thank you!
  14. Help With Green River Bird Leg

    I purchased a fossil collection several years ago that contained a beautifully preserved bird leg with some feathers preserved. It is was collected in the Green River Formation of Southwestern Wyoming. I know very little about fossil birds and am hoping someone on the Forum might be able to narrow the ID down to what family of bird it might be. Any Help will be greatly appreciated.
  15. Tapiromorph Fossil, Green River Shale, Wyoming http://www.wsgs.wyo.gov/wyoming-geology/tapiromorph-fossil Researcher Prepares Largest Fossilized Mammal Found In Green River Formation For Science By Cooper Mckim, Wyoming Public Media, May 2, 2018 http://www.wyomingpublicmedia.org/post/researcher-prepares-largest-fossilized-mammal-found-green-river-formation-science Tapir-ing expectations: Researchers study largest ever Green River mammal fossil. By Jeff Victor, May 2, 2018 https://www.laramieboomerang.com/news/local_news/tapir-ing-expectations-researchers-study-largest-ever-green-river-mammal/article_b08dfff8-4dc3-11e8-8a20-c3768c772488.html Yours, Paul H.
  16. From the album Vertebrates

    Asterotrygon maloneyi Carvalho, Maisey & Grande 2004 Middle Eocene Kemmerer Wyoming USA
  17. Priscacara Preparation

    @Ptychodus04 is preparing a fossil fish in exchange for some on the side web development (web page). Here's where he is at with the preparation and I must say that I'm very pleased with the results. This is going to turn out to be one amazing fish. Here's a before and after. The before was a fish that was broken in half and in need of some restoration and repair but is mostly there. Kris is really working his magic on this one.
  18. American Fossil Quarry Part 2

    Had a phenomenal time digging up Eocene freshwater vertebrae fossils in Wyoming this past weekend at @sseth and @FossilDudeCO famous American Fossil Quarry. Managed to convince my cousin, his two sons, and my family to join. @sseth set us up with our own rocks to split and he was very informative, showing us how to split the rock and what to look for. We all had a really good time. Here are some of the highlights. Matt's two sons Logan and Wesley had a blast. Here's their cart full of Knightia's. A sneak peak at some of the multi slabs I hauled away. On the bottom is a slab with five complete fish. There's one hiding in the sun and another top right that needs to be prepared out. Some of the finds. Some of these fish need some prep work to fully uncover. A personal favorite was the largest Diplomystus I have ever found. I should of put something in the picture for scale but this fish is nearly a foot wide. The heartbreaker of the day was this well preserve Mioplosus. The top and bottom halves of the head are missing! Still a nice looking fish and I'll use it for referencing the species in the years to come. Wesley holding up a decent sized Knightia. A view of the limestone rocks we were splitting. @sseth recovered a crocodile tooth from a small slab such as the ones pictured here some time ago. Matt trimming down his finds on the rock saw. My cousin Matt and his son Wesley showing off some of their prized fish. A front view of the rock quarry. There's a lot to offer at the site. Wes lining up fish for his dad to cut. Matt sawing away. The remains of the slabs after we split them down. We kept revisiting and respiting slabs. It was a lot of fun. The Seth clan hanging out under the shade, escaping the hot sun and dust. Couldn't resist snapping this photo. I really need to get one of these decals. @sseth on the left side. He was super helpful in showing us what to look for. That Mososaur skull on his shirt was recovered my him in Morocco. That is super neat. I'm holding up a large Knightia near Logan and Wes. Matt and his sons getting pumped to descend 50 million years into the Eocene. At 9:00am we were among the first on sight and we were all super excited to get to the digging and exploring. Wes (left) and Logan (right) braving the dust and sun to find Eocene fossils. Have to start them off young! Having dinner at a local Mexican restaurant in Kemmerer. The food was really good. We ordered Carne Asada that came with spicy salsa. Matt kept telling the waitress to bring out the "Gringo" salsa.
  19. Atractosteus simplex (Leidy, 1873)

    From the album Vertebrates

    Atracosteus simplex (Leidy, 1873) former name: Lepisosteus simplex Middle Eocene Green River Formation Kemmerer Wyoming USA Length 29"/ 73cm
  20. Tiny little fish

    A nice surprise happened last night as I was putting my best fish finds away from a trip to Sseth's quarry in Kemmerer, Wyoming last summer. I accidentally dropped a nice Knightia and while piking up the broken pieces, this is what was hiding inside!!! Almost didn't see I due to the tiny size. Any thoughts to species??
  21. Phareodus encaustus fish fossil

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Phareodus encaustus fish fossil Green River Formation, Kemmerer Wyoming Eocene Age (56 Million Years ago) Phareodus is a genus of freshwater fish from the Eocene to the Oligocene of Australia, Europe and North America. This genus includes at least four species, P. testis (Leidy, 1873) and P. encaustus of North America, P. muelleri of Europe, and P. queenslandicus of Australia. Representatives have been found from the middle Eocene to the Oligocene of Australia, Europe and North America, including the Green River Formation in Wyoming, United States P. testis was a freshwater fish with an oval outline, a small head, and a slightly pointed snout. Its dorsal and anal fins were situated posteriorly, with the anal fin being larger. Its caudal fin was slightly forked. It had small pelvic fins but long, narrow pectoral finsPhareodus belongs to the osteoglossids, which are represented today by the Arawana. Arawana is found in tropical and semitropical fresh waters of South America, central Africa, Southeast Asia, and northern Australia. Phareodus lived during the Eocene Epoch and is about 55 million years old They can be found in the fine-grained limestone layers of the River Formation. Fifty million years ago ancient Fossil Lake existed in what is now southwest Wyoming. Of its estimated maximum extent of 930 square miles, approximately 500 square miles of sediment remain. The 230 square miles across the center of the ancient lake-bed contain exceptionally fossiliferous sediments and associated geologic features including deltas, beaches, springs, and rocks from the center and near shore environments. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Subphylum: Vertebrata Infraphylum: Gnathostomata Superclass: Osteichthyes Class: Actinopterygii Family: Osteoglossidae Genus: †Phareodus Species: †encaustus
  22. Phareodus encaustus fish fossil

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Phareodus encaustus fish fossil Green River Formation, Kemmerer Wyoming Eocene Age (56 Million Years ago) Phareodus is a genus of freshwater fish from the Eocene to the Oligocene of Australia, Europe and North America. This genus includes at least four species, P. testis (Leidy, 1873) and P. encaustus of North America, P. muelleri of Europe, and P. queenslandicus of Australia. Representatives have been found from the middle Eocene to the Oligocene of Australia, Europe and North America, including the Green River Formation in Wyoming, United States P. testis was a freshwater fish with an oval outline, a small head, and a slightly pointed snout. Its dorsal and anal fins were situated posteriorly, with the anal fin being larger. Its caudal fin was slightly forked. It had small pelvic fins but long, narrow pectoral finsPhareodus belongs to the osteoglossids, which are represented today by the Arawana. Arawana is found in tropical and semitropical fresh waters of South America, central Africa, Southeast Asia, and northern Australia. Phareodus lived during the Eocene Epoch and is about 55 million years old They can be found in the fine-grained limestone layers of the River Formation. Fifty million years ago ancient Fossil Lake existed in what is now southwest Wyoming. Of its estimated maximum extent of 930 square miles, approximately 500 square miles of sediment remain. The 230 square miles across the center of the ancient lake-bed contain exceptionally fossiliferous sediments and associated geologic features including deltas, beaches, springs, and rocks from the center and near shore environments. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Subphylum: Vertebrata Infraphylum: Gnathostomata Superclass: Osteichthyes Class: Actinopterygii Family: Osteoglossidae Genus: †Phareodus Species: †encaustus
  23. Phareodus encaustus fish fossil

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Phareodus encaustus fish fossil Green River Formation, Kemmerer Wyoming Eocene Age (56 Million Years ago) Phareodus is a genus of freshwater fish from the Eocene to the Oligocene of Australia, Europe and North America. This genus includes at least four species, P. testis (Leidy, 1873) and P. encaustus of North America, P. muelleri of Europe, and P. queenslandicus of Australia. Representatives have been found from the middle Eocene to the Oligocene of Australia, Europe and North America, including the Green River Formation in Wyoming, United States P. testis was a freshwater fish with an oval outline, a small head, and a slightly pointed snout. Its dorsal and anal fins were situated posteriorly, with the anal fin being larger. Its caudal fin was slightly forked. It had small pelvic fins but long, narrow pectoral finsPhareodus belongs to the osteoglossids, which are represented today by the Arawana. Arawana is found in tropical and semitropical fresh waters of South America, central Africa, Southeast Asia, and northern Australia. Phareodus lived during the Eocene Epoch and is about 55 million years old They can be found in the fine-grained limestone layers of the River Formation. Fifty million years ago ancient Fossil Lake existed in what is now southwest Wyoming. Of its estimated maximum extent of 930 square miles, approximately 500 square miles of sediment remain. The 230 square miles across the center of the ancient lake-bed contain exceptionally fossiliferous sediments and associated geologic features including deltas, beaches, springs, and rocks from the center and near shore environments. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Subphylum: Vertebrata Infraphylum: Gnathostomata Superclass: Osteichthyes Class: Actinopterygii Family: Osteoglossidae Genus: †Phareodus Species: †encaustus
  24. The Winter 2017 issue of Fossil News is a special focus on Kemmerer, WY — the Gateway to PaleoTourism, USA — the Fossil Basin area; the Fossil Butte Nat’l Monument; Dig-Your-Own quarries; and much more. There was so much great content that we added four additional pages to the issue! · In the Beginning: An Excerpt from Lance Grande’s The Lost World of Fossil Lake · A Photo Gallery of Specimens from the Extraordinary Collections at Fossil Butte · Kemmerer Area directories: Rock & Fossil Shops, Dig-Your-Own Quarries, and more · A Visit to the Westmoreland-Kemmerer Coal Mine · Discovering & Photographing Ostracods in Eocene Green River “Turritella Agate” · American Fossil: The “Education Quarry” · A Monitor Lizard from Green River The Find of a Lifetime · SVP to Sue to Block Reductions to Grand Staircase & Bears Ears National Monuments · and more! Get your copy or subscribe: tinyurl.com/fnsubscribe. From now until the end of the 2018 Tucson shows, mention that you saw this notice on Fossil Forum and get the trade rate of $44/year (instead of $50).
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