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Found 13 results

  1. Hope some of the UK members can be of assistance. I want to go on my first collecting trip this summer, and have been doing a bit of research. One of my main interests is plants. I live in Hertfordshire, and the nearest location I can find that has plant material is Betteshanger in Kent. It's over 200 miles round trip, so not that close to me. Has anyone collected there? Did you come away with a decent number of finds. Does anyone know of any plant locations nearer to me? Thanks
  2. So I found these fossils around Tukwila Washington. I'm not looking for an ID but I'd just like to share with you some of the gastropods and bivalves I found along the way And for all you Washington fossil hunters, don't listen to people who say you need to be in Utah to find fossils, they are everywhere here (Information: These come from the Eocene time period 40 million years ago. Some of these fossils are Turritella Uvasana (Identified by Professional) some gastropods, some pecten looking shells (still not sure) and bivalves of unknown species.)
  3. Hello I found this at the isle of sheppey months ago and am still unsure what it is. It does remind me of bone, I was thinking a partial jaw bone of something but unsure, any help with be appreciated, found at the isle of sheppey, Kent, UK.
  4. Dissertation help!

    I'm doing a dissertation project on the Wanstum Channel, a historic sea channel in East Kent dividing the Isle of Thanet and Kent. The channel was formed by rising sea levels at the end of the last glacial period however had silted up during the medieval age. My work focuses primarily on the physical geography and the lasting legacy of the channel. However whilst undertaking some borehole work roughly 100m from the River Stour (what remains of the Wantsum Channel) I have uncovered a small shell piece fragment around 2-3mm in diameter. If i could have this fragment identified it would mean I could use the fragment as a proxy for climatic and environmental conditions of the time, which will make a great talking point! I'll be able to take further photos tomorrow with rulers to get exact measurements, but any help will be great. Cheers
  5. Scaphites

    From the album Bobby’s ammonites

    Scaphites Lower Chalk, mid Cenomanian Sussex Uk
  6. Folkestone, UK trip advice

    Hey everyone! My son and I are heading to Folkestone (and possibly Herne Bay if we have time) tomorrow to do some fossil hunting. I’ve heard that Copt Point is the place to go to look. Does anyone have any tips or advice before we go tomorrow? I’ve already checked tide times and have planned most of the trip around it. Thanks!
  7. Gault Clay Fossils

    Took some pictures of a small collection of fossils i have. They are all from Folkestone (Kent) Small Ammonites Belemnites Corprolites
  8. Found whilst digging for clay pipes, my son is very keen for this this to be a tooth. It's around 5cm in length. As far as I'm aware this bit of Kent was Cretaceous/palaeogene. Any help IDing would be great. I'm assuming it's just an interesting shaped bit of flint, but the ridges on the thin edge have him hopeful it's more exciting (and our previous finds have often not been quite as interesting as we'd hoped) I only have these photos for now, but should they not be good enough, I'll take some better lit close ups in a few days... thanks for your help!
  9. Isle of Sheppey UK, Odd Balls.

    Good afternoon, I have been looking for an ID on these for a while. I have found a thread from another site where they said the following. "Thank you for your enquiry, I have shown your specimen to a number of palaeontologists who found it interesting. After carefully examining your specimen, it seems that the most likely identification is pyrite forming around a phosphate nodule. It is possible that in the first instance, it formed around something biogenic, however, sadly, there is not enough evidence to be able to tell. The Isle of Sheppey is particularly interesting for studying Taphonomy (the study of decaying organisms over time and how they may become fossilzed). It can be considered a special place of preservation called a “Lagerstatten”. http://www.nhm.ac.uk/natureplus/message/85395 I was wondering if the regular internal geometry from the few 'balls' I have found may shed any more light on a possible answer. I love the way they only break in 3 almost equal directions. Even if these are not fossils, I still find it enchanting the way nature can produce these fractal shapes. Thanks in advance for any advice/answers you can give on these.
  10. Newbie with an ID request

    Hi there! I'm new here although I've been into fossils since I was a youngster! I managed to grab the following example on the south coast of Kent in the UK which is known for fossilised wood and footprints and bones etc. I thought it might be a fossilised tree limb or small trunk. What do you think? Any guidance very gratefully received! Thanks so much
  11. I found these fossils on Whitstable beach when the tide was out, what are they?
  12. Fish Verts

    I wonder if anyone can identify these. Cretaceous, folkestone Gault clay in England They are very small.
  13. As you are no doubt aware, the famous Maidstone iguanodont (NHMUK R.3741) has been christened Mantellodon carpenteri by Paul (2012). For more information on why Mantellodon is distinct from Mantellisaurus, see the following citation: Gregory S. Paul (2012). "Notes on the rising diversity of iguanodont taxa, and iguanodonts named after Darwin, Huxley and evolutionary science". Actas de V Jornadas Internacionales sobre Paleontologia de Dinosaurios y su Entorno, Salas de los Infantes, Burgos. Colectivo Arqeologico-Paleontologico de Salas de los Infantes (Burgos). pp. 121–131. The recognition of NHMUK R.3741 as a new genus and species of iguanodont is the final chapter in the taxonomic saga of the Maidstone iguanodont. Given that Mantellodon was found in marine limestone and the limestone itself was hard, the quarrymen who found the specimen could have just refrained from using dynamite to uncover the specimen because dynamite can destroy parts of a skeleton. When considering the possibility that the Maidstone iguanodont might be a distinct iguanodont, Carpenter and Ishida (2010) mistakenly referred the specimen to Iguanodon mantelli without knowing that NHMUK R.3741 had been discovered two years after I. mantelli was named and hence was ineligible to be treated as the type specimen of I. mantelli. I'm very glad that Paul recognized the erroneous statements in Carpenter and Ishida (2010). Indeed, I was curious to see the paper coining the binomial Mantellodon carpenteri because the type horizon for Mantellodon carpenteri (Hythe Formation*) is about the same age as the Spanish form Proa valdearinnoensis, shedding some light on the evolution of European iguanodonts at the late Aptian-early Albian boundary. Anyone in the UK who's interested in early dino discoveries in Europe should wake up to the fact that the Maidstone iguanodont is distinct from other British iguanodonts. As for the prospects of finding additional dinos in the Hythe Formation, they could yield articulated partial skeletons because of the taphonomy of the Hythe Formation (erosion-resistant limestone). *The Hythe Formation is one of four members of the Lower Greensand Group in southern England and overlies the Atherfield Clay Formation (the lowermost member of the Lower Greensand Group). Therefore, the Hythe Formation is a bit older than known remains of Mantellisaurus and so Paul's separation of Mantellodon from Mantellisaurus appears justified.
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