Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'lagerstätten'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 7 results

  1. Proposal to mine fossil-rich site in New Zealand sparks campaign to protect it https://phys.org/news/2019-06-fossil-rich-site-zealand-campaign.html http://theconversation.com/proposal-to-mine-fossil-rich-site-in-new-zealand-sparks-campaign-to-protect-it-118505 Scientist: maar not only 'outstanding' site By John Gibb, Otago Daily times https://www.odt.co.nz/news/dunedin/scientist-maar-not-only-outstanding-site https://www.odt.co.nz/news/dunedin/council-now-formally-opposed-expansion-mine Foulden Maar - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foulden_Maar Yours, Paul H.
  2. The 11th annual Western Interior Paleontological Society (WIPS) Founders Symposium with the theme of Lagerstatten (exceptional preservation) is near. It promises to be a Who's Who of paleo experts presenting over two weekend days. More details can be found here: http://westernpaleo.org/symposiums/2019_pages/about-2019.php SPEAKERS Speakers are coming from across the country to tell us about Lagerstätten — famous deposits known for their exceptionally preserved fossils — from Canada's Burgess Shale to Colorado's own Florissant Formation. Paleontologists scheduled to date are: Derek Briggs (keynote) Yale University Konservat-Lagerstätten — Burgess Shale and beyond William Ausich The Ohio State University Crawfordsville Indiana: Research inspired by a crinoid Lagerstätte Brent Breithaupt BLM-Western Region Robledo Mountain Formation vertebrate and invertebrate trackways (Permian, New Mexico) John Foster Utah Field House of Natural History State Park Museum Cambrian Soft-body Preservation in the House Range Embayment Succession (Wheeler, Marjum, and Weeks Formations), Millard County, Utah Lance Grande Field Museum of Natural History-Chicago The Lost World of Fossil Lake. Snapshots from Deep Time James Hagadorn Denver Museum of Nature & Science Fossil Jellyfish: The Ultimate in Remarkable Preservation John-Paul Hodnett M-NCPPC Dinosaur Park The Late Pennsylvanian (Missourian) Denizens of Kinney Brick Quarry, a Lagerstätte from the Atrasado Formation in Central New Mexico Sharon Holte The Mammoth Site of Hot Springs Ongoing and New Research at the Mammoth Site — Over 40 Years of Discovery Frank Krell Denver Museum of Nature & Science High Quality Insect Preservation — Fossils in Amber (Baltic, Lebanon, Myanmar) and from the Messel Formation (Eocene, Germany), with emphasis on scarab beetles Martin Lockley University of Colorado-Denver (Emeritus) An Ichnological Konservat-Lagerstätten in the Cretaceous of Korea: The Fruits of an Innovation in Tetrapod Tracks Research John Maisey American Museum of Natural History (Curator Emeritus) The Santana Fossil Assemblages from Brazil Herbert Meyer Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument The Fossils of Florissant Roy Plotnick University of Illinois Mazon Creek:A Pennsylvanian Konservat-Lagerstätte in Illinois James Schiffbauer University of Missouri Through the Taphonomic Lens: Witnessing the Dawn of Animals at the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition Hans-Peter Schultze Curator Emeritus, Natural History Museum, University of Kansas Solnhofen, a Window into the Jurassic Time Talk titles subject to change
  3. Good morning everybody, For anyone interested! Mid January 2019 I’ll publish a new book (in Italian, the english version is planned in 2020, but only if I'll recover the printing and translator costs) ‘Spiagge Cambriane. Meduse e tappeti algali’ [Cambrian shorelines - Jellyfish and Algal mats]. It concerns fossil jellyfish (and cnidarian in general) and their relation with algal mats, as a principal factor of the taphonomy of these soft-bodied organisms, covering fossils lagerstätten from Precambrian to the French Oligocene. The 232 pages book is rich of inedit illustrations coming from worldwide private and public collections, wonderful dioramas and includes a nice poster resuming the paleogeography and sites where these fossils come from. The first print will be limited (250 copies). Have a sneak preview (introduction, table of contents, bibliography and index) here: https://tinyurl.com/ybh8zb3t Do not hesitate to reserve your copy in time (but without engagement). If interested, please contact me with a message. Enrico
  4. Fruitbat's PDF Library - Taphonomy

    These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since June 27, 2017 Taphonomy - Fossilization and Fossil Formation Taphonomy - Africa/Middle East El Albani, A., et al. (2014). The 2.1 Ga Old Francevillian Biota: Biogenicity, Taphonomy and Biodiversity. PLoS ONE, 9(6). Taphonomy - Asia/Malaysia/Pacific Islands Anderson, E.P., J.D. Schiffbauer and S. Xiao (2011). Taphonomic study of Ediacaran organic-walled fossils confirms the importance of clay minerals and pyrite in Burgess Shale-type preservation. Geology, Vol.39, Number 7. Cai, Y., et al. (2012). Preservational modes in the Ediacaran Gaojiashan Lagerstätte: Pyritization, aluminosilicification, and carbonaceous compression. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 326-328. (Author's personal copy) Forchielli, A., et al. (2014). Taphonomic traits of clay-hosted early Cambrian Burgess Shale-type fossil Lagerstätten in South China. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 398. Mukherjee, D. and S. Ray (2012). Taphonomy of an Upper Triassic vertebrate bonebed: A new rhynchosaur (Reptilia; Archosauromorpha) accumulation from India. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 333-334. Taphonomy - Europe (including Greenland and Siberia) Beardmore, S.R. and H. Furrer (2016). Evidence of a preservational gradient in the skeletal taphonomy of Ichthyopterygia (Reptilia) from Europe. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 443. Domingo, M.S., et al. (2017). Taphonomy of mammalian fossil bones from the debris-flow deposits of Somosaugas-North (Middle Miocene, Madrid Basin, Spain). Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 465. Kowal-Linka, M. (2015). Analysis of marrow cavity fillings as a tool to recognise diverse taphonomic histories of fossil reptile bones: Implications for the genesis of the Lower Muschelkalk marine bone-bearing bed (Middle Triassic, Zyglin, S Poland). Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 436. Weitschat, W., et al. (2002). Taphocoenosis of an extraordinary arthropod community in Baltic amber. Mitt.Geol.-Palaont.Inst.Univ. Hamburg, Vol.86. Yesares-Garcia, J. and J. Aguirre (2004). Quantitative taphonomic analysis and taphofacies in lower Pliocene temperate carbonate-slicicilastic mixed platform deposits (Almeria-Nijar basin, SE Spain). Palaeogeoraphy, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 207. Taphonomy - North America Allen, J.P. and R.A. Gastaldo (2006). Sedimentology and taphonomy of the Early to Middle Devonian plant-bearing beds of the Trout Valley Formation, Maine. Geological Society of America, Special Paper 399. Caron, J.-B. and D.A. Jackson (2006). Taphonomy of the Greater Phyllopod Bed Community, Burgess Shale. Palaios, Vol.21. Demko, T.M. (1995). Taphonomy of Fossil Plants in the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation. Ph.D. Dissertation - The University of Arizona. Getty, P.R. and A.M. Bush (2011). Sand pseudomorphs of dinosaur bones: Implications for (non-) preservation of tetrapod skeletal material in the Hartford Basin, USA. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 302. (Thanks to doushantuo for pointing this one out!) Haynes, G. (2016). Taphonomy of the Inglewood mammoth (Mammuthus columbi)(Maryland, USA): Green-bone fracturing of fossil bones. Quaternary International, xxx. (Article in press) Hunda, B.R., N.C. Hughes and K.W. Flessa (2006). Trilobite Taphonomy and Temporal Resolution in the Mt. Orab Shale Bed (Upper Ordovician, Ohio, U.S.A.). Palaios, Vol.21. Irmis, R.B. and D.K. Elliott (2006). Taphonomy of a Middle Pennsylvanian Marine Vertebrate Assemblage and an Actualistic Model for Marine Abrasion of Teeth. Palaios, Vol.21. Kimmig, J.K.F. and B.R. Pratt (2016). Taphonomy of the middle Cambrian (Drumian) Ravens Throat River Lagerstätte, Rockslide Formation, Mackenzie Mountains, Northwest Territories, Canada. Lethaia, Vol.49. LaGarry, H.E. (2004). Taphonomic Evidence of Bone Processing from the Oligocene of Northwestern Nebraska. School of Natural Resources, Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Nebraska - Lincoln, Professional Paper Number 2. Leonard, E. (2013). The Taphonomy and Depositional Environment of Jurassic Lacustrine Fish Deposits, Westfield Beds, East Berlin Formation, Hartford Basin. Bachelor's (Honors) Thesis - Wesleyan University. Lucas, S.G. et al. (2010). Taphonomy of the Lamy amphibian quarry: A Late Triassic bonebed in New Mexico, USA. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 298. Peterson, J.E., et al. (2017). New data towards the development of a comprehensive taphonomic framework for the Late Jurassic Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry, Central Utah. PeerJ, 5: e3368. (Thanks to Oxytropidoceras for pointing this one out!) Petrovich, R. (2001). Mechanisms of Fossilization of the Soft-Bodied and Lightly Armored Faunas of the Burgess Shale and of Some Other Classical Localities. American Journal of Science, Vol.301. Rick, T.C., J.M. Erlandson and R.L. Vellanoweth (2006). Taphonomy and Site Formation on California's Channel Islands. Geoarchaeology, Vol.21, Number 6. Sander, P.M. (1987). Taphonomy of the Lower Permian Geraldine Bonebed in Archer County, Texas. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 61. Young, H.R., R. Li and M.Kuroda (2012). Silicification in Mississippian Lodgepole Formation, Northeastern Flank of Williston Basin, Manitoba, Canada. Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol.23, Number 1. Taphonomy - South America/Central America/Caribbean Bertoni-Machado, C. and M. Holz (2006). Biogenic Fossil Concentration in Fluvial Settings: An Example of a Cynodont Taphocoenosis from the Middle Triassic of Southern Brazil. Revista.bras.paleont., 9(3). Corona, A., et al. (2012). Taphonomy, sedimentology and chronology of a fossiliferous outcrop from the continental Pleistocene of Uruguay. Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Geologicas, Vol.29, Number 2. Menendez, L., et al. (2011). Taphonomy, Chronostratigraphy and Paleoceanographic Implications at Turbidite of Early Paleogene (Vertientes Formation, Cuba). Revista Geologica de America Central, 45. General Taphonomy Allison, P.H. and D.J. Bottjer (2011). Chapter 1. Taphonomy: Bias and Process Through Time. In: Taphonomy: Process and Bias Through Time. Allison, P.A. and D.J. Bottjer (eds.), Topics in Geobiology, 32. Andrews, P. (1995). Experiments in Taphonomy. Journal of Archaeological Science, 22. Behrensmeyer, A.K. (1978). Taphonomic and geologic information from bone weathering. Paleobiology, 4(2). Best, M.M.R. and S.M. Kidwell (2000). Bivalve taphonomy in tropical mixed siliciclastic-carbonate settings. II. Effect of bivalve life habits and shell types. Paleobiolgy, 26(1). Brand, L.R., M. Hussey and J. Taylor (2003). Decay and Disarticulation of Small Vertebrates in Controlled Experiments. Journal of Taphonomy, Vol.1, Issue 2. Butler, A.D., et al. (2015). Experimental taphonomy of Artemia reveals the role of endogenous microbes in mediating decay and fossilization. Proc.R.Soc.B, 282. Carpenter, K. How to Make a Fossil: Part 1 - Fossilizing Bone. The Journal of Paleontological Science, JPS.C.07.0001. Elder, R.L. and G.R. Smith (1988). Fish Taphonomy and Environmental Inference in Paleolimnology. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 62. Eren, M.I., et al. (2011). Flaked Stone Taphonomy: a Controlled Experimental Study of the Effects of Sediment Consolidation on Flake Edge Morphology. Journal of Taphonomy, Vol.9, Issue 3. Fernandez-Lopez, S.R. (2006). Taphonomic Alteration and Evolutionary Taphonomy. Journal of Taphonomy, Vol.4, Issue 3. Francillon-Viellot, H., et al. (1990). Chapter 20. Microstructure and Mineralization of Vertebrate Skeletal Tissues. In: Skeletal Biomineralization: Patterns, Processes and Evolutionary Trends. Vol.1 Carter, J.G. (ed.), Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York. (Thanks to doushantuo for pointing this one out!) Gaines, R.R. and M.L. Droser (2005). New Approaches to Understanding the Mechanics of Burgess Shale-type Deposits: From the Micron Scale to the Global Picture. The Sedimentary Record, Vol.3, Number 2. Gaines, R.R., et al. (2012). Mechanism for Burgess Shale-type preservation. PNAS, Vol.109, Number 14. Greenwood, D.R. (1991). Chapter 7. The Taphonomy of Plant Macrofossils. Jensen, S., M.L. Droser and J.G. Gehling (2005) Trace fossil preservation and the early evolution of animals. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 220. Locatelli, E.R. (2014). The Exceptional Preservation of Plant Fossils: A Review of Taphonomic Pathways and Biases in the Fossil Record. In: Reading and Writing of the Fossil Record: Preservational Pathways to Exceptional Fossilization. Laflamme, M., J.D. Schiffbauer and S.A.F. Darroch (eds.), The Paleontological Society Papers, Vol.20. Lyman, R.L. (2010). What Taphonomy Is, What it Isn't, and Why Taphonomists Should Care about the Difference. Journal of Taphonomy, Vol.8, Issue 1. McCoy, V.E. and D.S. Brandt (2009). Scorpion taphonomy: criteria for distinguishing fossil scorpion molts and carcasses. The Journal of Arachnology, 37. Nudds, J. and P. Selden (2008). Fossils explained 56. Fossil-Lagerstätten. Geology Today, Vol.24, Number 4. Orr, P.J., et al. (2016). "Stick 'n' peel": Explaining unusual patterns of disarticulation and loss of completeness in fossil vertebrates. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 457. Palmqvist, P. and A. Arribas (2001). Taphonomic decoding of the paleobiological information locked in a lower Pleistocene assemblage of large mammals. Palaeobiology, 27(3). Pewkliang, B., A. Pring and J. Brugger (2008). The Formation of Precious Opal: Clues from the Opalization of Bone. The Canadian Mineralogist, Vol.46. Pewkliang, B., A. Pring and J. Brugger (2004). Opalisation of Fossil Bone and Wood: Clues to the Formation of Precious Opal. In: Regolith 2004. Roach, I.C. (ed.), CRC LEME. Schiffbauer, J.D. and M. Laflamme (2012). Lagerstätten Through Time: A Collection of Exceptional Preservational Pathways from the Terminal Neoproterozoic Through Today. Palaios, Vol.27. Schiffbauer, J.D., et al. (2014). A unifying model for Neoproterozoic-Palaeozoic exceptional fossil preservation through pyritization and carbonaceous compression. Nature Communications, 5:5754. Seilacher, A., W.-E. Reif and F. Westphal (1985). Sedimentological, ecological and temporal patterns of fossil Lagerstätten. Phil.Trans.R.Soc.Lond. B, 311. (Thanks to doushantuo for pointing this one out!) Spicer, R.A. (1991). Chapter 3. Plant Taphonomic Processes. In: Taphonomy: Releasing the Data Locked in the Fossil Record. Allison, P.A. and D.E.G. Briggs (eds.), Plenum Press, New York. Wilson, M.V.H. (1988). Paleoscene #9. Taphonomic Processes: Information Loss and Information Gain. Geoscience Canada, Vol.15, Number 2.
  5. I've tentatively identified a number of Mazon pieces in my possession, and I was wondering if I could get some confirmations or corrections from those of you (all of you) who are more knowledgeable and experienced than I. The first (#1) based on length, fossilization curvature, and the pyritized mouth and throat slit, I believe to be Gilpichthys greenei.
  6. Mazon Creek ID Help Request

    I've purchased 'The Mazon Creek Fossil Fauna' by Jack Wittry, and have been fascinated, and nearly overwhelmed, by the wealth of information presented. With the great descriptions and photography, I've been able to identify quite a number of pieces in my collection, but it has been difficult for many of the specimens. I'm certain that this is the normal course of education that most of you have undergone over a period of years, and I'm sure that experience and familiarity will help. I'm requesting your help with identification on some of the more difficult pieces I've run into so far. The first one may simply be a seed pod or some other type of flora that wouldn't have been in the book, but on the chance it might be a coprolite, I'm asking for help: There are two 'pods' in the concretion. Each measures approximately 3/16" x 5/16". The photos are of the positive and negative of one of the pods. Second image in next post.
  7. Don't Ever Give Up

    I checked the internet for the Niagara Falls area. They were calling for thunderstorms with rain off and on for the day. I looked out the door at 6:30 to see dark clouds and water on the car. To go or not to go. Well as I had already packed my lunch last night and the fact that the site was 130 koliometers away, I decided to chance it and was pulling out the driveway at 7:00AM. I came close to not going though because of the thunderstorm warnings. (Boy am I glad I did not cancel out) Well I arrived at the Eurypterid lagerstatten (Bertie Waterlime) at 8:30 after a 90 minute drive and quick stop at Tim Horton's (coffee) with the intention of staying until 4:00. I lifted bedding planes and split rock pretty much non stop until 3:00. Ok I did stop for 10 minutes at noon to eat my soup and drink my tea. By 3:00 I had pretty much found nothing. Couple tergites, a few fragments of tail and that was about it. I was pretty much worn out and my wrist and right shoulder ached. A 2 pound sledge gets mighty heavy after 6 to 7 hours. Quarryman Dave from the forum had been here as well but had headed home just before 3:00. Unfortunately he left before anyone found anything....... I think he was having about as much luck as the rest of us. There were 4 collectors on site today. So it was about 3:15 and I figured I would start to pack up and go home. Took some of my stuff back to the car and then went over to see how another collector ( we will call him Mr. T.) was doing. It was my intention to see how he was doing and say my goodbyes. Turns out he was having pretty much the same luck (or non luck ) as me. Then as I was standing there chatting with him he lets out a little sign of joy as he had just split open a slab and there was a complete paddle assembly from a quite rare eurypterid (not remites or lacustris). Now the delema do I leave after seeing somene else find something good. Well I think you all know the answer to that one. Even though it was now 3:25. I could not just leave essentially skunked on the day. I had to do at just a little bit more before I could leave. I was now a little pumped having seen a quite unusual looking and large paddle assembly found by Mr. T. , so I went to the first hole I had worked at 8:30 and started to work like a mad man. Well within 5 minutes I pried up a section and could just see the edge of a head,it looked like a brown blob but as I started to clear around it it started looking real nice. There was that it seemed to have a walking leg visible. Most heads do not have their walking legs attached. I was getting very excited by this point. I used my small fine chisel for a bit and got it to the following stage. It was sprayed with a little water to bring out the contrast for the picture. I then proceeded to excavate all around the fossil. I was very lucky that a seasoned Eurypterid hunter who we are calling Mr. T was there and he had a rock saw. He was able to cut me a pedastle around the slab I then proceeded to split extremely carefully the top over the rest of the eurypterid. It came off in 5 heartbreaking and breathtaking at the same time pieces (the tops almost always split wrong on you) because as each one was removed we could see more of the Eurypterid until finally we got off the piece over the tail. I was now staring at a virtually complete in pefect condition eurypterus lacustris. More amazingly it was perfectly prone, not twisted and had both swimming paddles as well. By this point it was 4:15 and we had a bit of a crowd looking on. One of the onlookers who I will call Mr. S.C. is a bit of an expert on eurypterids ( he really is) and he commented that it may be the nicest one he has ever seen come out of this locale. Regardless if it is or is not it sure looks nice to me. Dumb me was caught up in the momment though and did not take a picture of it complete in situ. I did however mark North on the slab itself so I do know the orientation. Mr. S.C. indicated that it was classic orientation based on where he believes the currents came from at this locale. Here is the picture of the slab after I got it home. There is no gluing , preparation or restoration of any kind on this specimen. You see it exactly as it was cut, pedastalled and then split out of the slab. The measurements were 45 mm at the widest point, 151 mm straight line head to end of tail and 44 mm tail length. Here are some links to higher resolution images The moral of the story. I was ready to pack up and go home. I was feeling sore and a bit sorry for myself for not really having found anything at all . But then someone elses find made me want to give it just 15 more minutes. Turned out to be my personal best fossil find ever and perhaps one that I will never equal again. It was found 1 foot from where I had been digging at 8:30 and had given up on by 9:30. It was about 2 inches below the surface level of the rock. I chose to dig in that spot solely because I could chat with Mr. T. who was a couple feet further over. Thank you Mr. T. for the rock saw it would not have come out in one piece without it. And it never did rain... not a speck..... In fact got a bit of a sunburn on my face and arms.
×