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Found 33 results

  1. XXL Trilobite

    I have been sitting on these two pieses for a bit and wondered if anyone out the could help identify it. It was found in Nevada. The longest section is about 5.5 inches long before it runs off the rock. My best messurement is 5 inches wide shell. From what I can tell it have a fairly thick shell from the pos/neg. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  2. What kind of Brachiopod is this?

    I found this brachiopod as float on the side of the road. It was very near the transition of Devonian to Mississippian Lodgepole Formation in Little Belt Mountains, in Montana. The fossils is large. I'm thinking it might be a spiriferida.
  3. Fossils?! Please help identify

    The files I have are too large, I’m hoping to be able to post more pictures in the thread. These items were found on the Jurassic coast in the uk. The item in this image is smooth and solid, albeit there are parts of it broken off, it was whole when we found it.
  4. Everyone, Any help appreciated. It has been cast and is being referred to others as well. This is a large shale slab fro the Devonian which appears to have been flipped over from stream bottom during a heavy flood event. So this is most likely a positive of an actual negative trace. i.e. a perfect squiggly "groove" 3 feet long. Marc
  5. Found a tooth on the beach

    I found a tooth on the beach, but I am unable to identify the animal to which it belonged to. It has a width of about 1.5inches, so it is fairly large. Anyone who tries to identify it, your help will be much appreciated.
  6. Broken woolly Rhino skull, Need Help!!!

    Hi guys, Recently I ordered a partial wooly rhino skull and as you could imagine I was on the brink of tears when it arrived. I ordered from overseas and someone must have dropped the box or something? but I am contacting the seller to see if I could get a partial refund (but I have my doubts). So I am trying to be positive and make this my "not so little" prep project, there is one problem though. I have no idea what I'm doing! (I don't even know if It's salvageable) So this is where you amazing people come in. I would love to get this looking as original as possible and was wondering if there was a product for that, or if I could just use household items, Or maybe there's some other solution that is foreign to me? Anyway, I would love to here every idea and any advice you've got. I have taken some pictures that are listed below, the last two are it in the condition before it was sent. If you need any more pictures to refer to, Please! contact me otherwise thanks for taking the time to read this and hope to hear from you soon. Thanks so much, Ryan.
  7. Hemipristis serra

    This is by far the largest Hemipristis I have ever collected. At 1.81 inches wide, it is wider than the next longest one in my collection.
  8. Huge hemipristis?

    From what I have seen of other hemi teeth, they generally aren't much bigger than 2". But this really looks like those, only much bigger. Any ideas?
  9. Not long ago I won in an auction a Timurlengia Euotica tooth, I was absolutely amazed by the quality of the tooth and the size. It is a massive 7,5cm and is in really good condition. It arrived today and it's even better in person! I absolutely adore it and it's a huge jump for my theropod teeth collection, this is my third species of theropod tooth and I am more than happy with this beauty.
  10. Big ammonite found in Whitby

    Hi all I found a large piece of an ammonite at Whitby, the whole thing would of been more than a foot across. Would be great if I could get what species of ammo it is. Thanks for looking.
  11. Large Fossil Found in Oklahoma

    I live in Oklahoma and stumbled upon this. We weren't sure what sort of fossil this could be. I found it in an old dried up creek on our property. I have also found other fossils similar to this that are even larger and longer that are still half way embedded in the bed rock.
  12. ID on this Ammonite ?

    Hi I found this part of a large ammonite in car boot sale this morning. For the price of a £1 . Does anyone have any idea of the ID. Thanks all Bobby
  13. My recent trip to the Fort Payne has me wondering how big do brachiopods get? So why not a thread to show off the largest ones we've found! Here's some of my monsters... First up Productus sp. from the Fort Payne, Lower Mississippain. I think this is Syringothyris sp. from the same formation as the other. I believe this is Rhipidomella sp. (same formation.) Lets see yours!
  14. Dinosuar Tooth?

    I found this about a year ago in upstate pennsylvania in a rock quarry. I am still stumped by it...
  15. Hi, never posted before so please bare with. Found this fossil in a house clearance (Uk). It's sandy in colour across the surface and an off white (chalky) colour in exposed areas. Have included a tape measure in the pics for length (approx 10 inches). both sides (as shown) are deeply textured and it measures 3.1/4 in depth at its deepest but does taper down. (Hopefully shown in pics). Would really appreciate some help with this. PS each "segment" is divided by a very thin, but clear ridge/seam. Thanks all for your help Any more info required, I will do my best. Many thanks.
  16. Hey all, a new member here and hoping someone on the site can help with estimating the value of a large ammonite I have and wanting to sell for my aging father. I'll post photographs to help if requested. The shell is approximately 27 inches by 22 inches. It was unearthed by my amateur fossil hunting father in Shasta County California in 1972. He has told me that it is one of the largest specimens found in the north state. Any guidance on this is greatly appreciated. Shannon
  17. Well I was strolling through my buddies stone supply yard looking for nice sized rocks for the garden and I stumbled upon the coolest thing I have ever randomly found. A huge print! He charged me the cost of stone for it as long as he got to hold on to it for a bit to show his kids! I'm more than excited. I didn't have a tape measure with me but the print is about 2,1/2 to 3" inches at its deepest!
  18. I dug this out of the shale rock beach by Georgian Bay, Ontario Canada, and I can't seem to identify this fossil. 450 myo. It seems to have a tail that would have been covered in overlapping shells, which turns into something that looks similar to an abdomen. Quarter for scale.
  19. While spending the morning just at my honey hole of assorted Devonian debris, I came upon this very weathered fragment. I have good reason to suspect it is a trilobite cephalon fragment (weathered to the point of being almost exclusively a mold/cast). In terms of species I have a few ideas, but what makes me quite uncertain is the sheer size of this one. I have certainly never found very large Devonian trilobites in the past, so this one seems a bit of a perplexing one for me - if it is indeed a trilobite specimen and I'm not just getting my hopes up and seeing trilobite where some large brach and a bit of rock shaping might be.
  20. Large unknown fossil

    Found this in North Texas in a spot that has produced bison and mammoth fossils before (currently have a mammoth ulna from the site). Due to its large size I'm thinking this one is mammoth as well, just not sure which bone it might be part of. Any comments or thoughts are more than welcome
  21. large keichousaurus

    hello, just wanted to show you guys this one, it is pretty good size, 12.5" in length, let me know what you think
  22. IMG-2905.JPG

    From the album Some Highlights from the PD weekend

    Top three are Rhipodomella with the first one being fairly large. The remainder are Stropheodonta demissa.
  23. IMG-2904.JPG

    From the album Some Highlights from the PD weekend

    All are Spinatrypa spinosa.
  24. The new shark species named 'paradoxodon,' or paradoxical teeth, comes from the fact that the shark appears to have emerged suddenly in the geologic record with a yet unresolved nearly 45-million-year gap from when Megalolamna possibly split from its closest relative Otodus. The international research team who based their discovery on fossilized teeth up to 4.5 centimeters (1.8 inches) tall found the teeth in California and North Carolina, Peru and Japan. Credit: Kenshu Shimada Megalolamna paradoxodon is the name of a new extinct shark described by an international research team who based their discovery on fossilized teeth up to 4.5 centimeters (1.8 inches) tall found from the eastern and western United States (California and North Carolina), Peru and Japan. The newly identified fossil shark lived during the early Miocene epoch about 20 million years ago and belongs to a shark group called Lamniformes, which includes the modern-day great white and mako sharks. More specifically, it belongs to Otodontidae, which contains the iconic extinct superpredator 'megalodon' or the 'megatoothed' shark, and as an otodontid, Megalolamna paradoxodon represents a close cousin of the megatoothed lineage, said Kenshu Shimada, a paleobiologist at DePaul University and research associate at the Sternberg Museum in Kansas. Certain dental features suggest its otodontid affinity, but in many other aspects, teeth of the new fossil shark look superficially like over-sized teeth of the modern-day salmon shark that belongs to the genus Lamna—hence the new genus Megalolamna, the researchers noted. The new species name 'paradoxodon,' or paradoxical teeth, comes from the fact that the shark appears to emerge suddenly in the geologic record with a yet unresolved nearly 45-million-year gap from when Megalolamna possibly split from its closest relative Otodus. Although smaller than members of the megatoothed lineage containing 'megalodon' that reached well over 10 meters (33 feet), Megalolamna paradoxodon is still an impressive shark estimated to be minimally equivalent to the size of a typical modern-day great white, roughly 4 meters (13 feet) in length. Living in the same ancient oceans megatoothed sharks inhabited, Megalolamna paradoxodon had grasping-type front teeth and cutting-type rear teeth likely used to seize and slice medium-sized fish. "It's quite remarkable that such a large lamniform shark with such a global distribution had evaded recognition until now, especially because there are numerous Miocene localities where fossil shark teeth are well sampled," said Shimada, lead author of the study. In classifying the new fossil shark, the research team also came to a conclusion that members of the megatoothed lineage, including 'megalodon,' ought to be classified into the genus Otodus, and not to its traditional genus Carcharocles. "The idea that megalodon and its close allies should be placed in Otodus is not new, but our study is the first of its kind that logically demonstrates the taxonomic proposition," Shimada noted. Because the megatoothed shark lineage simply represents a subset of Otodus, excluding megatoothed sharks would not reflect a full lineage for Otodus—an uncomfortable taxonomic condition referred to as 'non-monophyletic.' The inclusion of megatoothed sharks into Otodus would make the genus a much preferred complete lineage referred to as a 'monophyletic group' that is considered to be a next of kin to the new genus Megalolamna. The new study, "A new elusive otodontid shark (Lamniformes: Otodontidae) from the lower Miocene, and comments on the taxonomy of otodontid genera, including the 'megatoothed' clade," will appear in the forthcoming issue of the international scientific journal Historical Biology and online on Oct. 3. In addition to Shimada, other authors include Richard Chandler, North Carolina State University; Otto Lok Tao Lam, The University of Hong Kong; Takeshi Tanaka, Japan; and David Ward, The Natural History Museum, London. Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-10-large-prehistoric-shark.html#jCp
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