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Found 39 results

  1. A new Triassic theropod-related paper is available online: Marion Zahner; Winand Brinkmann (2019). A Triassic averostran-line theropod from Switzerland and the early evolution of dinosaurs. Nature Ecology & Evolution. 3. doi:10.1038/s41559-019-0941-z. Notatesseraeraptor is the third European Triassic theropod for which cranial remains are known (the still-to-be-renamed form Zanclodon cambrensis [aka "Newtonsaurus"]), and given the lack of crests as in Dilophosaurus and its placement next to Averostra and Dilophosauridae, it indicates a higher cladistic diversity of early theropods from Late Triassic Europe.
  2. Does anyone have a copy of the following paper I could read: Valentin Buffa; Nour‐Eddine Jalil; J.‐Sebastien Steyer (2019). Redescription of Arganasaurus (Metoposaurus) azerouali (Dutuit) comb. nov. from the Upper Triassic of the Argana Basin (Morocco), and the first phylogenetic analysis of the Metoposauridae (Amphibia, Temnospondyli). Papers in Palaeontology in press. doi:10.1002/spp2.1259. Although Hunt (1993) designated Metoposaurus azerouali a nomen dubium, the paper by Buffa et al. overturns that taxonomic opinion by shedding new info on the anatomy of this little known species.
  3. Anaschisma redescribed

    A new metoposaurid paper is available online: Bryan M. Gee; William G. Parker; Adam D. Marsh (2019). Redescription of Anaschisma (Temnospondyli: Metoposauridae) from the Late Triassic of Wyoming and the phylogeny of the Metoposauridae. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology in press. doi:10.1080/14772019.2019.1602855. After being declared a nomen dubium by Hunt (1993), Anaschisma is now considered a senior synonym of Buettneria and Koskinonodon. By the way, does anyone have a copy of this paper? The question is whether "Buettneria" bakeri is considered generically distinct from Anaschisma browni.
  4. A new paper on early lissamphibians is available online: Michelle R. Stocker; Sterling J. Nesbitt; Ben T. Kligman ; Daniel J. Paluh; Adam D. Marsh; David C. Blackburn ; William G. Parker (2019). The earliest equatorial record of frogs from the Late Triassic of Arizona. Biology Letters. 15 (2): Article ID 20180922. doi:10.1098/rsbl.2018.0922. The frog material described by Stocker et al. is significant because it is the first record of Salientia from the Late Triassic, constituting the second described record of Late Triassic Lissamphibia after the primitive caecilian Chinlestegophis. The discovery of Late Triassic frog remains helps fill a gap in the fossil record of early frogs, because Prosailurus is the next oldest fossil frog known from diagnostic remains. Now the next step is to find a Triassic caudatan (salamander) specimen, because the earliest salamanders have been found in the Middle Jurassic.
  5. Late Triassic - New Mexico

    Date of Trip: June 2018 Location: Quay Co., NM, USA Age: Late Triassic Formation: Redonda This was the second of a number of hunting trips across the country this summer (the first was Silex, MO, reported earlier). This will be the Triassic Vertebrate report from this trip. Triassic invertebrate report will have to wait (perhaps exciting news ). Triassic plants and Cretaceous inverts from the same general locality will also be reported later. These are finds from a coarse-grained fluvial deposit rich in fish remains. In one layer, ganoid fish scales were almost as abundant as the mineral clasts. Here is a view looking down on the bedding plane showing the fish scales laying on top: Here is the same chunk of matrix cut across the bedding planes (i.e. in side view) showing numerous scales in transverse section: Disaggregation of the matrix and rinsing through a sieve yields numerous small, complete scales (scale in mm): Large scales are present in the matrix but heavily fractured and very difficult to extract intact. (Continued below)
  6. 1/2 coelacanth

    From the album Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    Diplurus newarki. front and lower half of fish. Late Triassic, Newark Supergroup, Newark Basin, Lockatong Formation, North Bergen, New Jersey. Old Granton Quarry. Scale is in CM.

    © 2019 T. Jones

  7. Tooth and Mandible Identification

    Hi, I found this tooth and possibly the upper mandible in an arroyo in New Mexico in a place called Copper Canyon. It is about 5.5 miles from Ghost Ranch. The layer is most likely late triassic chinle formation but it's on a major fault. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  8. Congratulations to @paulgdls on such a significant discovery. http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0194742 https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/04/prehistoric-sea-monster-largest-size-blue-whale-fossils-science/
  9. Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra Bull Canyon Formation, San Miguel County, New Mexico Late Triassic (~237 - 201.3 million years ago) Apachesaurus was a member of the Metoposauridae group of temnospondyl amphibians,‭ ‬though one that was particularly small.‭ ‬The larger close relatives of Apachesaurus include Metoposaurus and Koskinonodon which could grow up to two and a half to three meters long.‭ ‬Apachesaurus however grew only to around just over forty centimetres long. Due to the smaller size,‭ ‬Apachesaurus were probably predators of smaller aquatic organisms.‭ ‬Like other related genera,‭ ‬the eyes were placed further forward on the skull that those of other temnospondyl amphibians.‭ ‬Fossils of Apachesaurus are particularly well known from the states of Arizona and New Mexico where individuals have been found in concentrations.‭ ‬This seems to be a recurring theme that Apachesaurus shares with its relative genera,‭ ‬and the explanation is that metoposaurids were not very good at walking on land,‭ ‬so when pools of water and rivers dried out,‭ ‬they were left exposed to the air where they too dried out and died from lack of water. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum : Chordata Clade: Batrachomorpha Order: †Temnospondyli Family: †Metoposauridae Genus: †Apachesaurus
  10. Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra Bull Canyon Formation, San Miguel County, New Mexico Late Triassic (~237 - 201.3 million years ago) Apachesaurus was a member of the Metoposauridae group of temnospondyl amphibians,‭ ‬though one that was particularly small.‭ ‬The larger close relatives of Apachesaurus include Metoposaurus and Koskinonodon which could grow up to two and a half to three meters long.‭ ‬Apachesaurus however grew only to around just over forty centimetres long. Due to the smaller size,‭ ‬Apachesaurus were probably predators of smaller aquatic organisms.‭ ‬Like other related genera,‭ ‬the eyes were placed further forward on the skull that those of other temnospondyl amphibians.‭ ‬Fossils of Apachesaurus are particularly well known from the states of Arizona and New Mexico where individuals have been found in concentrations.‭ ‬This seems to be a recurring theme that Apachesaurus shares with its relative genera,‭ ‬and the explanation is that metoposaurids were not very good at walking on land,‭ ‬so when pools of water and rivers dried out,‭ ‬they were left exposed to the air where they too dried out and died from lack of water. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum : Chordata Clade: Batrachomorpha Order: †Temnospondyli Family: †Metoposauridae Genus: †Apachesaurus
  11. Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra Bull Canyon Formation, San Miguel County, New Mexico Late Triassic (~237 - 201.3 million years ago) Apachesaurus was a member of the Metoposauridae group of temnospondyl amphibians,‭ ‬though one that was particularly small.‭ ‬The larger close relatives of Apachesaurus include Metoposaurus and Koskinonodon which could grow up to two and a half to three meters long.‭ ‬Apachesaurus however grew only to around just over forty centimetres long. Due to the smaller size,‭ ‬Apachesaurus were probably predators of smaller aquatic organisms.‭ ‬Like other related genera,‭ ‬the eyes were placed further forward on the skull that those of other temnospondyl amphibians.‭ ‬Fossils of Apachesaurus are particularly well known from the states of Arizona and New Mexico where individuals have been found in concentrations.‭ ‬This seems to be a recurring theme that Apachesaurus shares with its relative genera,‭ ‬and the explanation is that metoposaurids were not very good at walking on land,‭ ‬so when pools of water and rivers dried out,‭ ‬they were left exposed to the air where they too dried out and died from lack of water. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum : Chordata Clade: Batrachomorpha Order: †Temnospondyli Family: †Metoposauridae Genus: †Apachesaurus
  12. Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Apachesaurus amphibian vertebra Bull Canyon Formation, San Miguel County, New Mexico Late Triassic (~237 - 201.3 million years ago) Apachesaurus was a member of the Metoposauridae group of temnospondyl amphibians,‭ ‬though one that was particularly small.‭ ‬The larger close relatives of Apachesaurus include Metoposaurus and Koskinonodon which could grow up to two and a half to three meters long.‭ ‬Apachesaurus however grew only to around just over forty centimetres long. Due to the smaller size,‭ ‬Apachesaurus were probably predators of smaller aquatic organisms.‭ ‬Like other related genera,‭ ‬the eyes were placed further forward on the skull that those of other temnospondyl amphibians.‭ ‬Fossils of Apachesaurus are particularly well known from the states of Arizona and New Mexico where individuals have been found in concentrations.‭ ‬This seems to be a recurring theme that Apachesaurus shares with its relative genera,‭ ‬and the explanation is that metoposaurids were not very good at walking on land,‭ ‬so when pools of water and rivers dried out,‭ ‬they were left exposed to the air where they too dried out and died from lack of water. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum : Chordata Clade: Batrachomorpha Order: †Temnospondyli Family: †Metoposauridae Genus: †Apachesaurus
  13. Unidentified bony fish tooth

    Dear Guys, I recently found one plate like tooth in dolomite erratic, probably Late Triassic age. It is 6 mm length and has rough texture that is not typical to chimaeroids. I guess it could be mouth plate of sturgeon (its mouth opens when four plates spread in the sides) but I did not find information about isolated these elements. Some very similar teeth are shown in interent pictures and are dating by Early Jurassic: http://www.darwincountry.org/explore/005818.html?CatAdd=5818&sid= Please help to identify this specific taxon of fishes with the same appearance of teeth, I think it belongs to actinopterygians. Best Regards Domas
  14. Please confirm frog omosternum fossil in matrix

    Dear Guys, I recently found the triangle bone in dolomite erratic of Varena town, South Lithuania, it is 4 mm length. It has the wider growths in the lower sides and straight blunt bony growth in the top. The dolomite also has poorly visible calcified lenses (maybe oncolites?). The erratic is typical to Triassic arid conditions and should belong to Late Triassic epoch because frogs from Early Triassic are found only in Madagascar island. Here is the link in frog omosternum: http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2010/08/27/blombergs-toad-and-buddies/
  15. IMG_7794.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Coelophysis Dinosaur tooth fossils SITE LOCATION: Bull Canyon Formation, Dockum Group, San Miguel Co., New Mexico TIME PERIOD: Late Triassic (203-196 Million Years Ago) Data: Coelophysis is an extinct genus of coelophysid theropod dinosaur that lived approximately 203 to 196 million years ago during the latter part of the Triassic Period in what is now the southwestern United States and also in South Africa and Zimbabwe. Coelophysis was a small, slenderly-built, ground-dwelling, bipedal carnivore, that could grow up to 3 m (9.8 ft) long. Coelophysis is one of the earliest known dinosaur genera. Scattered material representing similar animals has been found worldwide in some Late Triassic and Early Jurassic formations. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Dinosauria Order: Saurischia Family: †Coelophysidae Genus: †Coelophysis
  16. IMG_7794.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Coelophysis Dinosaur tooth fossils SITE LOCATION: Bull Canyon Formation, Dockum Group, San Miguel Co., New Mexico TIME PERIOD: Late Triassic (203-196 Million Years Ago) Data: Coelophysis is an extinct genus of coelophysid theropod dinosaur that lived approximately 203 to 196 million years ago during the latter part of the Triassic Period in what is now the southwestern United States and also in South Africa and Zimbabwe. Coelophysis was a small, slenderly-built, ground-dwelling, bipedal carnivore, that could grow up to 3 m (9.8 ft) long. Coelophysis is one of the earliest known dinosaur genera. Scattered material representing similar animals has been found worldwide in some Late Triassic and Early Jurassic formations. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Dinosauria Order: Saurischia Family: †Coelophysidae Genus: †Coelophysis
  17. Hello, this is a part 2 of my last thread with some of my other finds that I've found this at a site in new jersey where some footprints have been found from the Late Triassic/Early Jurassic, I am unsure about if these are footprints of sorts, any help will be appreciated thank you!
  18. Hello, I've found this at a site in new jersey where some footprints have been found from the Late Triassic/Early Jurassic, I am unsure about if this is a footprint of sorts, any help will be appreciated thank you!
  19. A new amphibian-related paper is available online: Jason D. Pardo; Bryan J. Small; Adam K. Huttenlocker (2017). Stem caecilian from the Triassic of Colorado sheds light on the origins of Lissamphibia. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. in press. doi:10.1073/pnas.1706752114. The discovery of Chinlestegophis is a groundbreaking development in recording the early evolution of extant amphibians because it not only fills a gap in the fossil record of early lissamphibians but also throws a wrench into the hypothesis of a temnospondyl origin of lissamphibians by recovering major groups of stereospondyls as sister to Caecilia and Gerobatrachus as closely related to frogs, toads, and salamanders. Literally, the patchy record of Triassic lissamphibians is part of the reason why there has been disagreement over whether lissamphibians are descended from lepospondyls or temnospondyls. Therefore, the textbook on early lissamphibian evolution has to be rewritten.
  20. Reconstruction

    From the album Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    This is a reconstruction of the late Triassic coelacanth, Diplurus newarki. Reworked by me. (reverse black and white) FROM: FOSSILS AND FACIES OF THE CONNECTICUT VALLEY LOWLAND: ECOSYSTEM STRUCTURE AND SEDIMENTARY DYNAMICS ALONG THE FOOTWALL MARGIN OF AN ACTIVE RIFT. Peter M. LeTourneau1,4, Nicholas G. McDonald2, Paul E. Olsen3,4,*, Timothy C. Ku5, and Patrick R. Getty Available HERE.
  21. Diplurus partial

    From the album Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    Diplurus newarki - partial coelacanth Late Triassic, Newark Supergroup, Newark Basin, Lockatong Formation, North Bergen, NJ, old Granton Quarry G-3 layer.
  22. Fish tail or more likely shell?

    Hi all, Maybe this find is past identification due to erosion, but i thought it may be of interest to others Length is around 8 inches I can see similar lines to the shell / tail feature on the right of the 'solid' part.. Wondering if anyone has any idea what it might be? is it two separate fossils perhaps? All the best Ben
  23. Coelacanth duo

    From the album Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    2 skulls of the Late Triassic coelacanth, Diplurus newarki. The larger of the two shows the front half of the fish, overlapping the body of a smaller coelacanth's body. from the Late Triassic, Lockatong Formation. Newark Basin, Newark Supergroup. Old Granton Quarry, North Bergen, NJ. The two fishes outlined in red:
  24. NJ Coelacanth

    From the album Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    A partial coelacanth, Diplurus newarki from the Late Triassic, Lockatong Formation. Newark Basin, Newark Supergroup. North Bergen, NJ.

    © 2017 Tim Jones

  25. Triassic coelacanth

    From the album Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    Late Triassic coelacanth, Diplurus newarki. Newark Supergroup, Newark Basin, Lockatong Formation, North Bergen NJ. Collected on 2/19/2017

    © 2017 Tim Jones

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