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Found 35 results

  1. Hello, this specimen is from an excursion in search of permineralized material in the upper formations of the lower Pennsylvanian Gobbler formation. In this particular formation I have found Psaronius and various Lycopsids, calamites&piths, etc. This is fairly weathered specimen in quartz sandstone, but the diamond pattern does not seem typical of Lepidodendron. Each 'diamond' seems more like a square. There appear to be 2 separate layers of diamond shaped material so these might be smaller branches toward the crown of a Lycopsid. The upper one is more complete in appearance. The lower one seems to have an additional overlay of material. Dimension of the upper one is 25 mm wide and 125mm long approx. Suggestions are most welcome.
  2. Lepidodendron (?) Bark

    I found this in Bochum-Weitmar, should be carboniferous. Is it a lepidodendron? Greetings!
  3. Lepidodendron oculus felis

    I was give these two pieces by a frirend who cliamed they are both from the same Shanxi formation ( lower permian, like missisippi in US) in Yangquan, a well known coal mine in North China. He said they are just two pierces of the same thing ( Lepidodendron oculus felis). I found it hard to swallow, as the two pieces look rather different. however after some digging into literrature, it seems he is backed by many old scholars (not all, though) including Kawasaki, Stockmans and Mathieu. The last two pics I got from an old book, which look rather similar to mine, are considered by these researchers as belonging to the same species, although they are rather far between in loacation and age ( from upper carbon to upper permian). please enlighten me.
  4. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lepidodendron Fossil SITE LOCATION: Eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (307-331 Million Yeas Ago) Lepidodendron — also known as scale tree — is an extinct genus of primitive, vascular, arborescent (tree-like) plant related to the lycopsids (club mosses). They were part of the coal forest flora. They sometimes reached heights of over 30 metres (100 ft), and the trunks were often over 1 m (3.3 ft) in diameter. They thrived during the Carboniferous Period (about 359.2 ± 2.5 Mya (million years ago) to about 299.0 ± 0.8 Mya) before going extinct. Sometimes erroneously called "giant club mosses", they were actually more closely related to today's quillworts than to modern club mosses. The name Lepidodendron comes from the Greek lepido, scale, and dendron, tree. By the Mesozoic era, the giant lycopsids had died out and were replaced by conifers as well as smaller Quillworts. This may have been the result of competition from the emerging woody gymnosperms. Lepidodendron is one of the more common plant fossils found in Pennsylvanian (Late Carboniferous) age rocks. They are closely related to other extinct Lycopsid genera, Sigillaria and Lepidendropsis. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Lycopodiophyta Class: Isoetopsida Order: †Lepidodendrales Family: †Lepidodendraceae Genus: †Lepidodendron
  5. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lepidodendron Fossil SITE LOCATION: Eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (307-331 Million Yeas Ago) Lepidodendron — also known as scale tree — is an extinct genus of primitive, vascular, arborescent (tree-like) plant related to the lycopsids (club mosses). They were part of the coal forest flora. They sometimes reached heights of over 30 metres (100 ft), and the trunks were often over 1 m (3.3 ft) in diameter. They thrived during the Carboniferous Period (about 359.2 ± 2.5 Mya (million years ago) to about 299.0 ± 0.8 Mya) before going extinct. Sometimes erroneously called "giant club mosses", they were actually more closely related to today's quillworts than to modern club mosses. The name Lepidodendron comes from the Greek lepido, scale, and dendron, tree. By the Mesozoic era, the giant lycopsids had died out and were replaced by conifers as well as smaller Quillworts. This may have been the result of competition from the emerging woody gymnosperms. Lepidodendron is one of the more common plant fossils found in Pennsylvanian (Late Carboniferous) age rocks. They are closely related to other extinct Lycopsid genera, Sigillaria and Lepidendropsis. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Lycopodiophyta Class: Isoetopsida Order: †Lepidodendrales Family: †Lepidodendraceae Genus: †Lepidodendron
  6. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lepidodendron Fossil SITE LOCATION: Eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (307-331 Million Yeas Ago) Lepidodendron — also known as scale tree — is an extinct genus of primitive, vascular, arborescent (tree-like) plant related to the lycopsids (club mosses). They were part of the coal forest flora. They sometimes reached heights of over 30 metres (100 ft), and the trunks were often over 1 m (3.3 ft) in diameter. They thrived during the Carboniferous Period (about 359.2 ± 2.5 Mya (million years ago) to about 299.0 ± 0.8 Mya) before going extinct. Sometimes erroneously called "giant club mosses", they were actually more closely related to today's quillworts than to modern club mosses. The name Lepidodendron comes from the Greek lepido, scale, and dendron, tree. By the Mesozoic era, the giant lycopsids had died out and were replaced by conifers as well as smaller Quillworts. This may have been the result of competition from the emerging woody gymnosperms. Lepidodendron is one of the more common plant fossils found in Pennsylvanian (Late Carboniferous) age rocks. They are closely related to other extinct Lycopsid genera, Sigillaria and Lepidendropsis. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Lycopodiophyta Class: Isoetopsida Order: †Lepidodendrales Family: †Lepidodendraceae Genus: †Lepidodendron
  7. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lepidodendron Fossil SITE LOCATION: Eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (307-331 Million Yeas Ago) Lepidodendron — also known as scale tree — is an extinct genus of primitive, vascular, arborescent (tree-like) plant related to the lycopsids (club mosses). They were part of the coal forest flora. They sometimes reached heights of over 30 metres (100 ft), and the trunks were often over 1 m (3.3 ft) in diameter. They thrived during the Carboniferous Period (about 359.2 ± 2.5 Mya (million years ago) to about 299.0 ± 0.8 Mya) before going extinct. Sometimes erroneously called "giant club mosses", they were actually more closely related to today's quillworts than to modern club mosses. The name Lepidodendron comes from the Greek lepido, scale, and dendron, tree. By the Mesozoic era, the giant lycopsids had died out and were replaced by conifers as well as smaller Quillworts. This may have been the result of competition from the emerging woody gymnosperms. Lepidodendron is one of the more common plant fossils found in Pennsylvanian (Late Carboniferous) age rocks. They are closely related to other extinct Lycopsid genera, Sigillaria and Lepidendropsis. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Lycopodiophyta Class: Isoetopsida Order: †Lepidodendrales Family: †Lepidodendraceae Genus: †Lepidodendron
  8. Lepidodendron (Scale Tree) Fossil 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lepidodendron (Scale Tree) Fossil SITE LOCATION: Kentucky, USA TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (307-331 Million Yeas Ago) Data: Lepidodendron — also known as scale tree — is an extinct genus of primitive, vascular, arborescent (tree-like) plant related to the lycopsids (club mosses). They were part of the coal forest flora. They sometimes reached heights of over 30 metres (100 ft), and the trunks were often over 1 m (3.3 ft) in diameter. They thrived during the Carboniferous Period (about 359.2 ± 2.5 Mya (million years ago) to about 299.0 ± 0.8 Mya) before going extinct. Sometimes erroneously called "giant club mosses", they were actually more closely related to today's quillworts than to modern club mosses. The name Lepidodendron comes from the Greek lepido, scale, and dendron, tree. By the Mesozoic era, the giant lycopsids had died out and were replaced by conifers as well as smaller Quillworts. This may have been the result of competition from the emerging woody gymnosperms. Lepidodendron is one of the more common plant fossils found in Pennsylvanian (Late Carboniferous) age rocks. They are closely related to other extinct Lycopsid genera, Sigillaria and Lepidendropsis. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Lycopodiophyta Class: Isoetopsida Order: †Lepidodendrales Family: †Lepidodendraceae Genus: †Lepidodendron Family: Lepidodendraceae Genus: †Lepidodendron
  9. Lepidodendron (Scale Tree) Fossil 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lepidodendron (Scale Tree) Fossil SITE LOCATION: Kentucky, USA TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (307-331 Million Yeas Ago) Data: Lepidodendron — also known as scale tree — is an extinct genus of primitive, vascular, arborescent (tree-like) plant related to the lycopsids (club mosses). They were part of the coal forest flora. They sometimes reached heights of over 30 metres (100 ft), and the trunks were often over 1 m (3.3 ft) in diameter. They thrived during the Carboniferous Period (about 359.2 ± 2.5 Mya (million years ago) to about 299.0 ± 0.8 Mya) before going extinct. Sometimes erroneously called "giant club mosses", they were actually more closely related to today's quillworts than to modern club mosses. The name Lepidodendron comes from the Greek lepido, scale, and dendron, tree. By the Mesozoic era, the giant lycopsids had died out and were replaced by conifers as well as smaller Quillworts. This may have been the result of competition from the emerging woody gymnosperms. Lepidodendron is one of the more common plant fossils found in Pennsylvanian (Late Carboniferous) age rocks. They are closely related to other extinct Lycopsid genera, Sigillaria and Lepidendropsis. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Lycopodiophyta Class: Isoetopsida Order: †Lepidodendrales Family: †Lepidodendraceae Genus: †Lepidodendron Family: Lepidodendraceae Genus: †Lepidodendron
  10. Lepidodendron Tree Branch Fossil A.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lepidodendron Tree Branch Fossil Kentucky, USA Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period - 323.2-298.9 million years ago Lepidodendron — also known as scale tree — is an extinct genus of primitive, vascular, arborescent (tree-like) plant related to the lycopsids (club mosses). They were part of the coal forest flora. They sometimes reached heights of over 30 metres (100 ft), and the trunks were often over 1 m (3.3 ft) in diameter. They thrived during the Carboniferous Period (about 359.2 ± 2.5 Mya (million years ago) to about 299.0 ± 0.8 Mya) before going extinct. Sometimes erroneously called "giant club mosses", they were actually more closely related to today's quillworts than to modern club mosses. The name Lepidodendron comes from the Greek lepido, scale, and dendron, tree. By the Mesozoic era, the giant lycopsids had died out and were replaced by conifers as well as smaller Quillworts. This may have been the result of competition from the emerging woody gymnosperms. Lepidodendron is one of the more common plant fossils found in Pennsylvanian (Late Carboniferous) age rocks. They are closely related to other extinct Lycopsid genera, Sigillaria and Lepidendropsis. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Lycopodiophyta Class: Isoetopsida Order: Lepidodendrales Family: Lepidodendraceae Genus: Lepidodendron
  11. Lepidodendron Tree Branch Fossil A.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lepidodendron Tree Branch Fossil Kentucky, USA Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period - 323.2-298.9 million years ago Lepidodendron — also known as scale tree — is an extinct genus of primitive, vascular, arborescent (tree-like) plant related to the lycopsids (club mosses). They were part of the coal forest flora. They sometimes reached heights of over 30 metres (100 ft), and the trunks were often over 1 m (3.3 ft) in diameter. They thrived during the Carboniferous Period (about 359.2 ± 2.5 Mya (million years ago) to about 299.0 ± 0.8 Mya) before going extinct. Sometimes erroneously called "giant club mosses", they were actually more closely related to today's quillworts than to modern club mosses. The name Lepidodendron comes from the Greek lepido, scale, and dendron, tree. By the Mesozoic era, the giant lycopsids had died out and were replaced by conifers as well as smaller Quillworts. This may have been the result of competition from the emerging woody gymnosperms. Lepidodendron is one of the more common plant fossils found in Pennsylvanian (Late Carboniferous) age rocks. They are closely related to other extinct Lycopsid genera, Sigillaria and Lepidendropsis. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Lycopodiophyta Class: Isoetopsida Order: Lepidodendrales Family: Lepidodendraceae Genus: Lepidodendron
  12. Lepidodendron Tree Branch Fossil A.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lepidodendron Tree Branch Fossil Kentucky, USA Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period - 323.2-298.9 million years ago Lepidodendron — also known as scale tree — is an extinct genus of primitive, vascular, arborescent (tree-like) plant related to the lycopsids (club mosses). They were part of the coal forest flora. They sometimes reached heights of over 30 metres (100 ft), and the trunks were often over 1 m (3.3 ft) in diameter. They thrived during the Carboniferous Period (about 359.2 ± 2.5 Mya (million years ago) to about 299.0 ± 0.8 Mya) before going extinct. Sometimes erroneously called "giant club mosses", they were actually more closely related to today's quillworts than to modern club mosses. The name Lepidodendron comes from the Greek lepido, scale, and dendron, tree. By the Mesozoic era, the giant lycopsids had died out and were replaced by conifers as well as smaller Quillworts. This may have been the result of competition from the emerging woody gymnosperms. Lepidodendron is one of the more common plant fossils found in Pennsylvanian (Late Carboniferous) age rocks. They are closely related to other extinct Lycopsid genera, Sigillaria and Lepidendropsis. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Lycopodiophyta Class: Isoetopsida Order: Lepidodendrales Family: Lepidodendraceae Genus: Lepidodendron
  13. Lepidodendron sp. (Sternberg 1820)

    From the album Plantae

    Imprint of a stem. From the late Carboniferous Westfalian at Calonne-Ricouart, France. Recieved on a trade with Gery (Nala)
  14. Lepidodendron or coral?

    While I was looking at a recent post here on the forum trying to help someone identify a Lepidodendron tree root I realized I had found something similar to Lepidodendron bark that I had just assumed was a piece of coral since I found it near other aquatic fossils. I found is somewhere near Decorah, Iowa (I don't remember exactly where). It's a bit worn, but does anyone know what it is?
  15. Lepidodendron aand Odontopteris

    From the album Cory's Lane Fossil Locality

    Imprint of a Lepidodendron branch and Odontopteris reichiana pinnules. Found in 2016 at the Cory's Lane fossil locality, Rhode Island.
  16. Lepidodendron

    From the album My Collection

    Here is another plant material plate I found over at Cory's Lane, Rhode Island. This medium sized plate has a lepidodendron branch going through the middle with calamites and neuropteris leaves around the edges of the matrix.
  17. I found my largest fossil yet yesterday. I assumed that it was Lepidodendron and was curious what species it may be, but it occurred to me after looking through images that I may have some other form of Lepidodendrales. Can anyone confirm? It's about 29cm (about 11.5") long with a circumference of 53.6cm (about 1' 9"). Leaf scars are about 3.5cm (about 1.4") tall by 1cm (about 0.4") wide. The scars wrap around the nearly-cylindrical specimen, only absent on roughly a third of the backside (last photo) where it may have broken off or is still hidden under the matrix. It was found in the Hyden Formation (Middle Pennsylvanian) in Johnson County KY. The closest result I've found has been Lepidodendron lanceolatum, but the pits are more centered than those in my specimen and I haven't been able to find any info on whether or not they occur in my area. Rockwood suggested that it may actually be Lepidophloios that has rolled-up at a 90 degree angle rather than being a Lepidodendron cast, which would be consistent with pit placement. What are your thoughts?
  18. Lepidodendron?

    I bought this specimen many years ago in a small museum in Austria. The fossil itself is a very fragile flat piece of coal, was collected locally and sold by the same paleontologist who works in the museum itself. I cleaned it by myself since it was not prepared and covered in soil fragments, the real shape of the fossil had remained hidden behind a black layer of dust. When purchasing, I was told that it probably was a bark fragment from Alethopteris, but looking at it now I have the heavy suspect that it is instead a small Lepidodendron branch (excluding all the surrounding undefined plant material). More detailed information: found on mount Königsstuhl in Nockalm, southern Austria dated 330 million years, Middle Mississippian, Carboniferous measures approximately 21,7 x 14,2 cm This additional photo can be found on my Deviantart page, (am I allowed to post this link here?)
  19. I found this piece about a month ago while hiking near Starved Rock, IL with my girlfriend. It is so strange that i thought TFF may enjoy it. I've never seen anything like it and it is my biggest piece of pyrite to date. It is a large 18cm x 5cm piece of pyrite encapsulating a piece of Lepidodendron fossil from the Carboniferous period. Unfortunately when i collected it the piece was in a shale wall and when extracting it some of the lepidodendron had broken off and was too shattered to save. But here she is. Continued....
  20. Stigmaria Ficoides

    Would anyone have any sort of idea of how much this Stigmaria fossil might be worth? It is approximately 12 in. x 6 in., I do not know where it originally is from. It was found within the landscape rocks of my sisters house, which is in southwest Ohio. From what I know of these, they are Carboniferous and not typically found around here, since most of the fossils found here (Cincinnati, OH) are usually Ordovician. I was thinking this stigmaria might have been transported with rocks from a quarry for landscaping purposes. The house is over 50 years old, so I have no way of knowing where the rocks came from. I was thinking of offering my brother in law something for this fossilized tree root (He does not collect fossils by the way.) What would this stigmaria be worth to someone who collects fossils like me? Thanks to anyone who replies, your opinions will be appreciated.
  21. Lepidodendron

    Lepidodendron bark.
  22. Felt bad about leaving this one behind, but will have to wait for another day. Too heavy for me to carry out. The top came out in a few pieces and I am afraid the bottom will also. Beautiful specimen I think.
  23. Among my first posts here was a piece that I initially thought was some kind of coral, but those who reviewed it thought it may have been Lepidodendron Stigmaria, although still puzzled by its appearance. After countless times of looking it up, I've yet to see any Lepidodendron fossils (root or not) that look quite like it. I was reading up on fossils again recently and came across another Pennsylvanian fossil (related to Lepidodendron) that, in my opinion, looks far more like my specimen. Do you guys think it may instead be Sigillaria? Attached are some examples. EDIT: Close-ups added later in topic (post #9). Edge close-ups in post #26.
  24. Is this considered Lepidodendron? Also, I posted the question before but did not receive any reply. What causes the greenish jue on some of the fossils>
  25. Found this today. Is it the top of a Lepidodendron?
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