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Found 5 results

  1. Plant material

    Hi, i wish a good day for all of you. I've visited another new place where i could find miocene plant material in a ligniteous clay.It had rain for days there and the place is covered by vegetation, so i only looked on the border of a road and i found those two items. First photos are taken in daylight, others under a magnifying glass and artificial light. The scale is in centimeters. 1)
  2. In september of 2013 a small piece of history was made in a Late Cretaceous formation here in Tennessee. In that month, I discovered a whole tree which had been fossilized to Jet! Jet is an organic mineraloid substance which is something of a rarity. Other organic mineraloids would be Amber and Pearl. A Mineraloid is something not technically a true mineral because it is derived from matter of an organic nature. In this case, this Jet could be described as a fossil, a mineraloid, or even a semi-precious gemstone. Our ancestors have had quite a long relationship with Jet which stretches back atleast to the Neolithic, like Amber, it has always been a prized material because of its electrostatic properties. So, without further ado, i wish to show the world the first glimpse of Tennessee Jet. & to be sure, i contacted The Tennessee Division of Geology in Nashville, spoke w/ the State Geologist. He was unaware of this mineraloids occurrence in Tennessee's borders....so a cross reference of the latest edition of The Minerals Of Tennessee was quickly made.....it's not in there either! (Truely, Jet is pretty rare everywhere else in America too.) So here is the first photos that anyone has ever saw of this material.....you can plainly see it use to be a tree, now it's Jet! There is an untold hundreds of pounds of this i have found....all still in the shape of a single tree!
  3. Possible Lignite Cone

    This specimen is late Cretaceous, formation is of marine origin. This perhaps could even be the central part of a depleted cone??? Pollen cone of some sort??? It has a hollow passing through it from end to end. It appears that it cracked somewhat and that surface area then filled in with sand.
  4. An Amazing Cretaceous Botanical

    This is a paleobotanical i have put the finishing touches on. It is extremely unusual for my area....the only one i actually know of. It simply isn't listed in any of prof. Berry's works, nor any later works by later botanists. It has been shown to 1 paleo botanist and 1 prof. of geology, neither gave me any feedback as to it's possible botanical source. It seems this one is pretty hard to i.d. The specimen comes from a late Cretaceous formation that is marine in origin, and very close to 80 mya. The source layer for this material appears to have been originally deposited as driftwood which in turn became lignite, @ some point iron bearing waters came into contact with the lignite, which in turn covered it over w/ a thin crust- like material. This specimen is fragile, probably as fragile as it was when deposited....if not for the ferro-type crust encasing it, the specimen would have probably never have retained it definition. Truely, i have found tons of lignites, but have never ran up on a specimen of this order. Perhaps it's a new botanic for Tennessee? To me,it looks like araucaria! @ first glance, one would sware it's a cone.....until rolling it over and seeing a branch sticking out the side! This specimen needs an i.d. badly, as,it is perhaps "new" (atleast for Tn, if not more). And the first person to positively identify it will receive credit in a academic paper that is being written. Thanks for taking the time to help.
  5. "Petrified", permineralized, silicified wood from Triassic Newark supergroup in Pennsylvania. Probably Araucarioxylon; same genus as in Arizona Petrified Forest national park. Some specimens have dark lignite on surface. For scale: silver discs in photo are USA quarter coins (0.995 inch or 2.42 centimeters in diameter).
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