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Found 249 results

  1. Hi, I am Joel, I am completely new to this forum, and I came here because I need some help on something I have been absolutely fascinated with. At work in St. Louis, Missouri, the other day, I found on our lot what I believe to be a chunk of limestone approx. 5" x 2-1/2" x 1-1/2" thick which has some VERY interesting features on one side, and I have spent the better part of the last few days searching the internet for images of fossils that resembled anything on this rock - and aside from the little 'seashell' at the one end, came up largely emptyhanded. I am not sure if the lines on this rock are plant, animal, or possibly even insect. I am sorry to say, this rock was not found in it's native strata, but rather plucked from the building's low-maintenance landscaping - they used crushed limestone as a topping in some areas outside the building, and this one, owing to it's large size, stood out. How long it has been exposed to the elements, I don't know, but I was amazed at how crisp the lines were, with depth, and sharpness, they don't seem to have experienced much weathering at all. I tried photographing the lines to pick up on that detail - the sharpness, but couldn't capture it - not enough zoom. One small possibility, at one end of our building, there IS a limestone outcropping - perhaps one of my coworkers was strolling on the property one day, stooped to examine a rock (this rock) recently calved from that outcropping, and just happened to carry it back towards the door, and dropping it amongst all the other bits of crushed limestone? I took a ton of photos, picked the best, reduced them and uploaded as many as allowed. Can anybody even suggest what I am looking at, and where I might find more information? Any help at this point would be a godsend! Joel H
  2. Help me ID this

    I found this near a river in La Matea (Jaen, Spain) the zone is predominantly mesozoic and the rock is limestone. I'm not sure if it's a fossil or some kind of formation. I have two similar specimen, is like a cylinder that goes from one side to the other of the rock, in one of the images I've partially removed some of the rock. Thank you.
  3. Hi, a few days ago I went on my first ever fossil hunting trip to Eben-Emael, a Limestone quarry in Belgium that dates to the Maastrichtian and is part from the type location (the historical ENCI quarry being only a 3,5 km to the north. The trip was orginized by the BVP (Belgische Vereniging voor Paleontologie) and a short report of the trip with phot's and some of the finds can be found in this topic by @Manticocerasman who I was lucky enough to tag along with, cause I doubt I would have found many mention worthy fossils without the guidance of Kevin. But since I am into microfossils I decided to collect some samples of the limestone without the obvious fossils home to later be able to look for microfossils as it should be quite rich. I think I have around 1 - 3 kg of matrix left to look for microfossils. But I have never myself dissolved matrix, and although it seems easy, I don't want to make any mistakes. During the trip they advised me on two different approaches, depending on what kind of fossils I wanted to find. One approach was dissolving in water and the other in vinegar, but now the seeming obvious question. How exactly do I do that? Should I just take a bucket of a glass, fill it halfway with said liquids and just wait? Or should I use a sieve and lay the block there so only fossils remain in the sieve and the rest goes to the buttom. Does the limestone just dissolve or does some kind of putty residu where the microfossils will be in? If so, how to properly remove the fossils when you pour out the liquids without pouring out the fossils? I know I have many questions and some might be very obvious and straigh-forward, but I really haven't done this before and I would like to do it the right way from start. So thanks in advance for any tips & tricks, I would really appreciate any help!
  4. Found today on the English Yorkshire Coast ( Runswick bay). At first i thought it was maybe layers of a type of fossilised plant but I cant find anything to match the markings on this. Completely baffled by it. Looks very cool though. ID help, please?
  5. Please help me ID

    Hi There Team, i am new to fossils and new to this forum, I have found the attached and feel like its a fossil, What stikes me is the symetry with it and the gill like lines on both sides, Looked like a tooth to begin with but now im really not sure, I found this is New Zealand in Limestone. If any of you have any information i would really appreciate the help. Thank you very much.
  6. Burnt Cretaceous wood

    Hello everyone again. About a month ago, while I was fossil hunting in local Dallas creek, I came across what looked like a prehistoric burnt wood that has been exposed by creek water. When I looked at it, other half of the wood was missing and washed away. Other half was embedded into a rock as you can see on the picture, part of the wood was petrified and other half was in carbonized form. It smelt like sulfur / burnt wood. I dug it out and kept the wood in my collection, but some still remains in the limestone. It was very strange that single burnt fossilized log was embedded in the limestone layer and petrified like that. Has anybody seen something like this?
  7. North Central Texas Fossil?

    Just wondering if this is a fossil and of it is, what do you think it might be? Sorry I didn't have a ruler when taking pics. My thumb is on the pics and it's about an inch or a little less across. This was found in a limestone riverbed near Justin, Texas (North Central Texas). We have found many other smaller marine fossils (actually casts I think - I am not an expert by any means) that I am pretty sure are from the Cretaceous Period in the same area. I have more pictures that are higher resolution, but I can't upload them here due to the size restrictions. Thanks in advance for any info or ideas that you might have.
  8. claw or tooth ID please

    I think it was found in Canyon Lake TX- it should be limestone.
  9. ID of tubular fossil

    2 inches in length found in an area where lots of fossils of shells, worms/tube plants, trilobites, etc. Lots of limestone and flint.
  10. To continue discussion on the specimen listed here, with renewed focus on it being a Cephalopod. As of right now, I'm deciding between Solenocheilus and Ephippioceras. Going directly by the book: Index Fossils of North America (1944, 1980 printing), I can see positives for both. Solenocheilus (Lower Mississippian to Lower Permian, IN, IL, MO, KS, TX and Europe) Recommended by a local expert, but doesn't specialize in Cephalopods. Ephippioceras (Mississippian in Europe, Pennsylvanian, Ohio to Kentucky, Nebraska to Texas) The raised line along the midline of the plate photo is what is selling me on this one. My specimen is much larger than the plate, but not quite double the size. So, two new photos of the specimen. First, looking at the line: (After seeing it this way, I was looking at it 90 degrees in the wrong direction) Flipped, End over end. So, any opinions? I was thinking of removing more matrix from the matrix heavy size, but it will certainly remove the shell material and leave the steinkern.
  11. Fossil Identification in Western Wisconsin

    *Higher resolution and many more images linked below to Google Drive for a clear view* Fossil: Large limestone rock containing hundreds of marine fossils and with what appears to be a bone roughly 3cm in diameter. As well what appears to be the remains of other bone structures. Location: Found 10 miles from the Mississippi River near Ellsworth, Wisconsin USA (Western Wisconsin) in a low valley area that looks like an ancient river bed. Rock Measurements: Roughly 15cm x 28cm My Understanding of Geology and Paleontology: 2/10 *There are a vast amount of images so I'd uploaded them to Google Drive in high resolution here: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=1-QkitLR3bwWFEn0Dh6OoNngsH8F5O31w I found this large limestone rock on our property near what I imagine would be an ancient riverway located at the bottom of a recharge point (aka hill). During heavy rains this area can literally turn in to a river and wash the soil down stream. This rock appears to contain all of the common marine fossils you'd find in Western Wisconsin from what I've researched. However, there's what appears to be a bone or unusual looking aquatic creature near the snail as shown. The snail was extremely well preserved before the vinegar soaking ate the shell and pigment away. A bit more about the location in which it was found; I had been landscaping the slope of the soil for about 2 years in the backyard by shovel. I had lived in this home for about 4 years and I found the soil to be unusual versus any other home I've lived in nearby. The heavy, wet clay soil contained many large green basalt rocks - I'd never seen one before this time. The bedrock is limestone but about 100 FT away the bedrock is sandstone (according to geological maps). The Mississippi river is 10 miles from this location in western Wisconsin near Minnesota. It's also in the path of the "Great Midcontinent Rift" which I find interesting. There are also many large "bluffs" and rolling hills. It's a beautiful area. Anyhow, I'd like to find out what else may be in this rock. It has been in vinegar for about 2-years and is slowly changing shape which in my imagination resembles a skull. I'd like to find a means to protect the exposed fossils while the limestone is absorbing. I had read something about fossil glue or plaster that can protect the exposed fossils while in the acetic acid. This is an educational experiment for me and I've always wanted to learn about paleontology and geology. Any help and identification would be appreciated! There are so many fossils and things to look at in this rock that I uploaded the images to a public folder on Google Drive so that others can view them in a higher resolution. My Galaxy Note 8 is not the best at focusing on close up images so please forgive my photography. If you see something interesting I'd be curious to know! Thanks! -Jack from Western Wisconsin (Google Drive images: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=1-QkitLR3bwWFEn0Dh6OoNngsH8F5O31w)
  12. found in sone limestone gravel

    I found this in some gravel they had poured to backfill a slope near the white river. My amateur guess is horn coral but I was hoping for a more educated opinion. Thanks Front side back side
  13. Late Carboniferous Oyster or Clam II

    A second large Clam or Oyster? I dug a huge piece of limestone out of the hill and split it into three with a sledge hammer so that I could actually pick pieces up. After the heat this weekend, they were easy to pick apart once I got them home. Yesterday, I found the first piece. This is the one I found today. When it came out of the rock I was a bit shocked at how large it was. I carefully tapped around the specimen and was able to remove most of the surrounding rock carefully. This is the larger of the two pieces I found this weekend. I have less confidence in identifying it as has less features than the first piece. You can see shell material flaking off in the 3rd and 4th photos below. The fossil after I found it: Then, once I removed it from the rock:
  14. Late Carboniferous Oyster or Clam

    I love and hate finding large fossils. They are really interesting and striking to look at, but I have a hard time getting an ID on them. I dug a huge piece of limestone out of the hill and split it into three with a sledge hammer. After the heat this weekend, they were easy to pick apart. Yesterday, out popped this piece. There is another one I found today that I will be posting after this one. This piece has several wavy ridges. The shell material looks pearly, and perhaps some calcite replacement has happened. There was a piece of shell stuck on the mold portion as well. I'm seeing about 6 distinct ridges. Anyone know what it might be? Before I removed it from the rock: Several views after removing, trying to show the ridges:
  15. Another stone from Croatia

    Hi, it's me bothering you guys again with yet another find I can't identify. The stine is close to 10cm on the longest side. I found it at the coast near Nin surrounded by some Nummulites. Some pieces look almost sponge like... like there are canals running through? I can't make heads or tails of it.
  16. Bone or limestone?

  17. I took my family across the river to Clarksville Indiana today to visit The Falls of the Ohio State Park. It was very hot with a high in the 90s, but we had a good time walking the Devonian fossil beds and visiting the Interpretive Center . The river was down enough to get onto the upper limestone beds, but the lower beds were still underwater. They are typically exposed during the months of September and October and occasionally in the summer when there is little rain (not this year!). The river is at 20 ft right now. The lower beds become dry around the 13.5 ft mark. Their official website has a page that monitors the river levels and tells you when certain areas and strata are exposed. I suggest checking that out before making the trip to visit the park. https://www.fallsoftheohio.org/current-ohio-river-conditions/ The Interpretive Center houses the main indoor exhibit, gift shop, a river viewing room, and bird/wildlife viewing room, along with friendly staff. The main exhibit has fossils and interactive areas for the kids. Not only are there fossil on display, but also sections regarding the Native Americans that lived in the area, the current wildlife, and information regarding the Lewis and Clark expedition. A piece of fossilized wood just outside of the center on the backside by the parking lot. It is roughly 4 feet in length and 2 feet wide. When you walk into the main foyer of the Interpretive Center this boulder is on display. It is about a meter across and half as thick. I don't want to spoil the trip for everyone so I'm just going to post some pictures of a few of my favorite pieces. I thought this was interesting. It's labeled as orange chert, which I assume it is, but it also has a horn coral right in the middle of it. A sampling of the fauna found in the fossil record here. There was also a small exhibit on mammoths as evidence of a few have been found in the surrounding area. Presumably crossing the Falls to get to the salt licks in Kentucky. This was a comparison of a mammoth and mastadon tooth. The interior exhibit is nice, but for me the best part of the Falls of the Ohio is outside. Its the fossil beds that you can walk on and explore. I've been here a few times and find something new each time I come. Remember folks, it's against the law to collect here. Leave the fossils alone for others to enjoy! No matter how tempting... . If you just have to collect something, the park usually has a couple of dump truck loads of material near the back of the parking lot that they allow you to search through. Seriously. Here are some of the fossils that me and the family found while walking around the fossil beds. A word of caution, if you want to get to certain areas there is some climbing that you must do. A lot of the strata has fissures or large boulders that must be climbed, or walked around to move farther down the coast. This is on the fossil beds themselves. You can stay higher on the slope and circumvent a lot of the really strenuous stuff, but the fossils are not as good the higher up you go. Here are a some of the more impressive horn coral that I found. They actually call these larger ones "tusk coral" because the are so large. I'm not certain what these coral are, but Siphonophrentis and Cystiphylloides are common here. I know a hand isn't the best for scale, but it's all I had at the time. lol From the tip of my index finger to where my thumb connects is just over 5 inches. Some mainly brachiopod hash plates. A large favosites. Crinoids Lace Bryozoan This was my favorite find. A large colonial coral. It is over a meter in diameter. What is commonly called a Pipe Organ Coral. Eridophyllum I think that is all for now. It was a great day of discovery and fun with the family. If you are in the area and have a couple of extra hours, I highly recommend you stop by and check out the sights for yourself. You won't be disappointed. Just remember to check the river water levels and be ready for a little exercise!
  18. Golden Bay queries

    I've been trying half heartedly to get an ID on this for a while now, stoked I've stumbled on this forum! This is from the golden Bay cement works quarry in Nelson, NZ. Found in same area as many bivalves, sharks teeth, corals and snails.
  19. Long shot micro fossils

    Two mystery mini fossils. I’ll include scale photos, with marks at 1/2 mm. I’m on the lookout for Carboniferous Trilobites, and examples I’ve seen are very tiny in this formation, no more than 1/2 inch long.
  20. Hey TFF Members! Cris and I were able to get out and do some super fun Echinoid hunting earlier this week! We were able to find some very nice specimens from the Eocene. If anyone has an ID on the big thick one I found in the video, please let me know! We got stuck in some nasty storms on this trip, but were also lucky enough to see a stunning rainbow! It was a great trip. Check out the vid if you get a chance!
  21. Worthenia perhaps

    While working on a specimen, this little gastropod fell out. Its measures about 7mm wide. Is it a Worthenia or something else? Being so small, I'm not sure it looks like the classic examples I find on fossil plates. Ruler is in mm. Found in the Glenshaw Formation. Pennsylvanian in age.
  22. Hi guys, Could anyone Tell me if this Fossil Is real? I bought in México, it Is supposed to be from the State of Coahuila, it Is over 600 mm. The specimen was kept in an old man garaje not for sale, i saw it and i bought it from him.... He had another one from different genus that definetly was real from the same location but it was in a very bad condition, so i only buy this one. Thanks for any help!!
  23. I noticed this interesting shape in the walkway to a corporate building in Germany. The walkway is composed of rectangularly-cut limestone(?) slabs. The size is roughly 6in x 12in. Any thoughts? I'm not even sure its a fossil, but the shapes strike me as organic.
  24. One of my first exciting finds was a piece that looked like a tooth back in March. Turned out to likely be just a cool shaped rock. Fast forward 3 months and I finally found this today, which I believe is an actual tooth. But I'm no expert, is my identification correct?
  25. Old Bone or Ancient Tool fossil?

    I found this piece of limestone that seems to be too much of a coincidence for it to fit in my hand just right. It almost reminds me of the manubrium of the sternum but then I thought it could maybe be an ancient carved tool. It could also be just a rock :-). Any help would be appreciated.
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