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Found 208 results

  1. My dad actually found this a few years ago in our driveway and thought I'd know what it was so he brought it to me. Pretty sure our limestone gravel came from an Indiana quarry. Haven't really been able to figure out what it is. Some of the grooving looks like it could be a clam but the things that kinda resemble teeth are throwing me off a bit. Anyone think they could help me out?
  2. I collected with @ rwise in the Goodland Limestone, Lower Cretaceous of Cooke County Texas today. I found this semi-circular fossil that may be a burrow. Looking closer at the large end there was a dotted line, lower left. Closer... Closer... Closer... That's a mm scale and this is the best my camera will do close-in... Any ideas?
  3. Oolitic limestone

    Not a fossil (although in some contexts, a pseudofossil), but I cut and hand-polished a piece of oolitic limestone this evening. These are nice, big, ooids (pisoids in this case), and one can easily see the layering. I thought some might like to see the results (scale in mm).
  4. Crab carapace?

    Unknown fossil. Found just below a tidal deposit and above a deep water lime deposit. In this layer there are a lot of good sized amonites, and a smattering of pelecypods and scallops and oysters and protocardia and urchins that become much more common just up the rock sequence. Just a bit deeper are fairly common trace fossils of burrowing shells.
  5. Any ideas of what this is

    Anyone have any insight to whether this may be a fossilized claw of some sort or just a peculiar shaped piece of limestone. I found this in central Texas outside of Bandera. Thanks in advance for any help.
  6. Last fall the state of Illinois purchased over 2,600 acres near the town of Oglesby from Lone Star Industries, including former quarries, with the goal of making it into state park land. It is near the site of the popular Starved Rock and Matthiessen State Parks, and the state said it would take a few years to assess and prepare the site before it would be open to the public. http://www.newstrib.com/free/matthiessen-and-starved-rock-just-got-a-lot-bigger-video/article_203e37f8-d89a-11e8-9a7e-e72ef52ec0d6.html The quarry exposes the highly fossiliferous LaSalle Limestone, as well as a black shale that produces fossils too, so a number of scientists and fossil enthusiasts proposed that a portion of the new protected land should be made into a public fossil park- here is their proposal: https://www.esconi.org/files/proposal-for-a-fossil-park-at-the-former-lone-star-quarry-site-final.pdf Now a state legislator representing the area has introduced a bill to do just that- the synopsis reads: "Amends the Department of Natural Resources (Conservation) Law of the Civil Administrative Code of Illinois. Provides that the Department of Natural Resources shall designate a portion of the former Lone Star Quarry site near Oglesby as a fossil park to allow for the collection of fossils. Provides that Department by rule may designate which portion of the land shall constitute the fossil park and any requirements for admittance or permits for entry into the fossil park. Provides that the Department may collaborate with any State university to establish educational opportunities or events at the fossil park." Hopefully this will become a law and this park can join the famous Mazonia-Braidwood as Illinois's second park for fossil collecting. If you are an Illinois resident, please contact your state representative and tell them to sign on as co-sponsor or support this bill!
  7. Creek bed fossil

    I found this fossil a few weeks ago. It was in a creek bed that flows during the wet season but has pools in the dry. I know the creek has sandstone, but it also looks like it has limestone and possibly slate. There is also a lot of rocks containing rust. This fossil appears to be stained with it. I am located in Western Kentucky near Hopkinsville. One side looks like it is ribs. The other side is smooth and one part is unusually round. There are pockets that appear to be filled with sediment that has solidified into rock. I've added pictures from all sides and others with measurements. I will add them as replies since the files are too large. I wish I had more, but this is all I have.
  8. Belemnite or Ammonite?

    Need help identifying the following fragment. Took it out of the limestone in the locality Theokafta of the Argolis Peninsula, near the Ancient Theatre of Epidaurus (Greece, eastern Peloponnesus). The limestone contains condensed ammonoid beds of the Hallstatt facies (Triassic: Anisian–Ladinian). Since I've never seen an ammonite with a cigar shaped ending and the belemnite fossils I've see so far are bullet shaped, I would really appreciate your opinion on the matter! The size is 5cm and diameter 1,5 to 2cm.
  9. Ammonites - Epidaurus

    Need help identifying the following ammonites. Found these fragments in limestone, in the locality Theokafta of the Argolis Peninsula, near the Ancient Theatre of Epidaurus (Greece, eastern Peloponnesus). The limestone contains condensed ammonoid beds of the Hallstatt facies (Triassic: Anisian–Ladinian). The size of A is about 8 cm and B is about 6cm (which woyld probably make it about 10-12cm if complete). Any suggestions would be much appreciated!
  10. Triassic fossil

    Need help identifying the following fossil. Found this fragment in the limestone in the locality Theokafta of the Argolis Peninsula, near the Ancient Theatre of Epidaurus (Greece, eastern Peloponnesus). The limestone contains condensed ammonoid beds of the Hallstatt facies (Triassic: Anisian–Ladinian). The size of the fragment is about 1,5 cm. Any suggestion would be much appreciated!
  11. Monotis?

    Hi there. Found this rock a few months back, assuming for the moment that it's a monotis sp which are pretty common to Triassic marine sediments here in NZ. Any other opinions would be appreciated.
  12. Ear Protection for Fossil Hunting?

    I know that eye protection, padded gloves for hammering to reduce harmful vibrations, and many other safety measures have been oft repeated on this forum to guard against injury, but I haven't seen much about ear protection specifically in regards to fossil hunting. First, an unnecessary backstory: I recently came to the realization that I have tinnitus and, being a bit of a hypochondriac, got myself freaked out over it. But that is, of course, silly since I can remember having tinnitus for years but just not really thinking about it. After calming down and realizing that I have had it for years, that it's very minimal tinnitus, and that it's not as bad as cancer, I have been considering ways that I can avoid making it any worse. Along with wearing earmuffs while vacuuming, I have begun to look for other strategies to avoid hearing damage. Now, some of these may be stupid questions (don't let anyone tell you, "there is no such thing as a stupid question."), but here it goes. The formation in which I hunt the most is the limestone/chalk Atco formation. One of my main means of finding fossils is just whacking on chunks of chalk, hoping to luck into some ammonites, echinoids, fish, or a perfectly articulated pterosaur clasping a new species of cretaceous mammal in its talons, and I have had much success (maybe not the last part). I mostly use an Estwing 4lb sledge and Stanely chisels with hand guards to do the job, but sometimes also use a 10 pound sledge for the harder and larger chunks. This works fine, but because I am dealing with relatively hard matrix the pinging of the sledge against the chisels can get annoying, but could it over time also cause tinnitus and hearing damage? Since I have gotten ear protection aware I have begun wearing EP3 Sonic Defenders when fossil hunting which have the great feature of allowing sounds like normal conversation and ambient noise in while reducing any noises above 85dB when the caps are off and greatly reducing all noise when the caps are in. Some of their other plugs like the EP4 and EP7 do the same thing and have more protection with the caps in, so I might get one of those too. So, my questions are: 1-When is it appropriate to wear ear protection while fossil hunting? 2-Could the pinging of my hammer against the chisel and/or chalk chunks cause hearing damage and thus tinnitus over time? 3-What kind of hearing protection do you recommend? Is what I am using ok? BONUS QUESTION-Any recommendations for padded gloves to get?
  13. Mysterious fossil found in Cincinnati

    I found a fossil that looks like no other in my collection. Any help to what it would be is much appreciated. Found in a creek rock deposit in Cincinnati area. Here are several angles and lighting.
  14. Hey, I'm just starting out and I wanted to know, what preparation tools and tactics will work best for removing limestone without damaging the specimen? (Preferably low budget) I also don't have a lot of workspace since I'm just taking a crack at this legitamate, fine-detail stuff for the first time; and after some research on air scribes, abrasives, and erasers, I realize they are much too costly and the whole air system and workbox takes up a lot of room I don't have. So is there anything you all could recommend for me?
  15. I am looking for information on what kind of fossil this may be. It is in a limestone block wall in Ontario, Canada. There is evidence of crystallization in most of the fossils and crevices. This example is almost a foot long, 4 inches in height. There are brachiopods in many of the blocks as well, and a number of fossils similar to this example.
  16. Vacation Fossils

    Our first full day of sun, sand, and surf in Jamaica bumped up against some fossils, and pseudofossils. In this area (St Ann’s Parish), more than 75% of the rock here is limestone spanning from the Cretaceous to periods in the Cenozoic. Not far from me is the Blue Mountains, the highest altitude on the island (we’re planning on a day trip to see the coffee cultivators and a 12 mile downhill bike ride). Given the abundance of limestone, it is no surprise that it features prominently in a lot of building material. Here is some fossil coral in some large, raw blocks:
  17. Trilobites from Belgian carbonates

    hahncarboniflimestrilobitefaciesecolgeogrdistributbsbg_nr97_1988_077-093.pdf The Biostratigraphical distribution of Carboniferous Limestone Trilobites in Belgium and Adjacent Areas Bulletin de La Societe Belge de Geologie,T.97,fasc.1,1988 outtake(one of several pretty nice line drawings): size: about 2,9 MB
  18. Fossil? Funny rock?

    Hi everyone! What about this one? It was found in a well-known fossil site, an old cretaceous sea, in central Spain (Maranchón, Guadalajara, Spain). I would say the texture suggests a living creature of some kind. Too bad it would be a small fragment.
  19. fossil limestone wood

    Nice day to all here ! Could anyone tell a tree? Location Czech Republic, limestone board. Because it has fallen in the limestone, the crust is quite cruel. It would probably break apart. Can you advise me to have a tip for conservation?
  20. Actinocrinites? Mineral?

    Hi! I always post specimens that may be just minerals... which are the real difficult ones for me to identify. I would like to ask you what do you think about this one. It was found near the other two specimens I posted before, one of them seem to be a baryte nodule and the other one we still do not know for sure. It was found in Santorcaz, NE Madrid province, Spain, in a site where miocene fossils have been found, and where we can still find many limestones which originated in an old lake. I think this may be... only may be... part of an actinocrinites called "calyx" (?). Thank you all!
  21. Nice day to all here. Today I have here something " UFO " for me. Localization : Czech Republic, allegedly limestone pan, Cretaceous period. It was between limestones parts. The part in red circle is really hard like carapace - not possible to cut by knife edge ( outdoor good knife ). So what it can be ?
  22. Hello! Is it an echinoid?

    Hi! This is another specimen I found next to the others I just posted. While the others are red and look like coral, this one looked to me as a skull at first glance. I collected it and I found out it had an intertesting soft texture over the hard stone when I started to clean it. I can say it is a bit like skin... so I stopped the cleaning process because it came off. It seems to be broken. Maybe an echinoid? The problem is always that the fossil may be really inside the matrix... Thanks!
  23. Hello! What is it?

    Hi, I would like to ask you if you happen to know what these fossils are. They were found in central Spain, on a farm field that I have learned to be a not well-known Miocen limestone lacustrine site. It remineded me of petrified wood when I first saw it and then I thought it could be coral. However, if you look carefully you can see that it was possibly part of a rould-like creature as I could find several pieces that actually fit. As you can see, the creature was not all the same as part of the surface where the pieces seem to assemble look totally different. The surface is not perfectly round. Please let me know if you happen to know what it is. Thank you!
  24. Hello! I live in Ocala. Whenever my community starts constructing a new neighborhood, I go and search through the piles of limestone that they bring in to make the roadbed. It usually is different than the “local” softer chalkier limestone that is prevalent right here. This batch has a lot of beautiful brown and blue chert, the usual Florida fossils , some coated in druzy crystals (?) . There have been a few that I found last weekend that I cannot definitely identify. I appreciate any help, and any info on what area this limestone might be from. There are 3 photos here plus 2 more in the first reply. Thanks! Margaret
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