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Found 15 results

  1. Upper Devonian Fossil Guide?

    Yesterday, I was participating in an Open House event with my local mineral club. I had a display of fossils, minerals, and American Indian artifacts from New York state, and found that the person assisting visitors at the door was sending all of the people who brought fossils in to my table. This was lots of fun, but I rapidly discovered a problem with the two fossil guide books I own: while they both have a lot of information about Lower and Middle Devonian fossils, there wasn't enough breadth on Upper Devonian for me to really give a positive ID of anything found locally! The best I could manage was to point to a Middle Devonian species and say something like "The holes in your rock look a lot like the impressions that on of these brachiopods, Pseodoatrypa devoniana, might leave, but those were earlier and didn't get that big. I don't know what your fossils are other than something similar." Can anyone recommend a good resource for Upper Devonian material? What I currently have are the two PRI publications on Devonian Fossils of New York (one by Linsley, the other by Wilson).
  2. Looking for a few texts

    I'm trying to find : A Manual of Practical Laboratory and Field Techniques in Palaeobiology By O.R. Green And the paper "The use of plastics in the "transfer method" of preparing fossils" (can't remember the author, and can't find it listed now.) Anyone have any leads? Thanks in advance!
  3. Being an amateur fossil collector, yet long time "rock hound", I became interested in learning and discovering what these fossils I picked up were. How did they come about and why? I live within the Cincinnatian Arch even though I'm in Southeast Indiana, it's a small area and Ordovovician in nature. But this book helped me understand what this area looked like, the stratification, and information of the fossils most commonly found here. I'm always looking for books and knowledge, so glad I found this forum!!
  4. Hallo everybody, I am searching for this osteological atlas: PALES, L. & LAMBERT, C., 1971 - Atlas Ostéologique pour servir à l'identification Des Mammifères du quarternaire - Les Membres Herbivores. Has anybody access to especially this volume? Many thanks, Thomas
  5. Book I’m currently reading (just started it). Dinosaurs: The most complete, up to date encyclopedia for dinosaur lovers of all ages, by Dr. Thomas R. Holtz. I am enjoying this book so much because it’s easy to follow, it’s organized, and it breaks down the different types of dinosaurs. Very educational. Check out the beautiful illustrations.
  6. Hello, I have been recently shopping around for fossil books that are more image heavy to look around at on my downtime, the few I have so far seem to be generally focused on all fossils and contain hardly any fossil vertebrates from the mesozoic or tertiary periods. Thus I am on the look out for any books that would be good fits, there was one I cannot remember the name for the life of me that I think is a large recent book that I've seen in B&N that goes over all time periods in full color with fossil photos/creature images, if anyone knows maybe which one that could be I was definitely on the lookout for it but any recommendations are awesome.
  7. Here is an annotated list of the best Arizona paleontology literature organized Back to main page by lithostratigraphic unit. Chinle Formation Geolex Publications. link Coconino Formation Geolex Publications. link Brand., L. R. (1979). Field and Laboratory Studies on the Coconino Sandstone (Permian) Fossil Vertebrate Footprints and Their Paleoecological Implications. Palaeogeog. Palaeoclimat. Palaeoecol., 28:25-38. link Controversial paper that tries to recreate trackways made in Coconino Sandstone. Concludes that they were most likely made underwater. Brand, L.R., and J. Kramer. (1996). Underprints of Vertebrate and Invertebrate Trackways in the Permian Coconino Sandstone in Arizona. Ichnos, 4:225-230. link. Many prints in the Coconino may actually be underprints. Erickson, Bruce R. (2011). Lower Permian Tracks and Traces in the Science Museum of Minnesota. Ichnofossils III. Volume 5: Paleontology. 120 pp. link. Great photos of only Coconino trace fossils. Dakota Formation Kirkland, J. I. (1996). Paleontology of the Greenhorn Cylcothem (Cretaceous: Late Cenomanian to Middle Turonian) at Black Mesa, northeastern Arizona. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 9:1-131 link Fort Apache Member of Schnebly Hill Formation Geolex Publications. link Winters, S.S. (1963). Supai Formation (Permian) of Eastern Arizona. Geological Society of America Memoir, 89, 99 p. link. Best paper for fossils. Additional species have been found by TFF members waiting to be properly documented. Behind a paywall. Frazier, R.H. (1961). The Fort Apache Limestone of East Central Arizona. M.S. thesis, Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, 58 p. link. Gerard, Thomas A. (1964). Environmental Studies of the Fort Apache Member, Supai Formation, (Permian) East-Central Arizona. Phd Dissertation, University of Arizona. link .Best stratigraphy. Arizona Chris' TFF posts: link link link link link link link link link link link link Hualapai Formation Blair, W. N. and A . K. Armstrong. 1979. Hualapai Limestone Member of the Muddy Creek Formation: the Youngest Deposit Predating the Grand Canyon, Southeastern Nevada and Northwestern Arizona. USGS Professional Paper 111. Link. Pictures of fossils. Geolex: link Kaibab Formation Geolex Publications. link Batten, R. L. (1989). Permian Gastropoda of the Southwestern United States. 7. Pleurotomariacea: Eotomariidae, Lophospiriidae, Gosseletinidae. American Museum Novitates 2958:1-64. Chronic, Halka. (1952). Molluscan Fauna from the Permian Kaibab Formation, Walnut Canyon, Arizona. Geological Society of America Bulletin 63. link. Very good resource for mollusks. Cisne, J. L. (1971). Paleoecology of Trilobites of the Kaibab Limestone (Permian) in Arizona, Utah, and Nevada. Journal of Paleontology 45(3)45: 525-533. Hodnett, J. P. M., Elliott, D. K., Olson, T. J., & Wittke, J. H. (2012). Ctenacanthiform Sharks from the Permian Kaibab Formation, Northern Arizona. Historical Biology , 24 (4), 381-395. Good paper on Permian sharks. link. Hunt, A.P., et al. (2005). Permian Vertebrates of Arizona. In: Vertebrate Paleontology in Heckert, A.B. and S.G. Lucas (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin Number 29. link. Vertebrates are not common in the Arizona Permian. Nicol, D. 1944. Paleoecology of Three Faunules in the Permian Kaibab Formation at Flagstaff, Arizona. Journal of Paleontology 18(6):553-557. McKee, E. D. (Edwin Dinwiddie). (1938). The Environment and History of the Toroweap and Kaibab Formations of Northern Arizona and Southern Utah. Washington, D. C.: Carnegie institution of Washington. link. Naco Formation Geolex Publications. info ASU West. Fossils of the Naco Formation. link. Photos of fossils from the now gone original Kohl's Ranch site. Beus, S.S., and Brew, D.C., 1978, Paleontology of the Naco Formation in the Kohl Ranch area, Arizona, in Burt, D.M., and Pewe, T.L., eds., Guidebook to the geology of central Arizona, 74th Cordilleran Section Meeting, Geological Society of America, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona: Arizona Bureau of Geology and Mineral Technology Special Paper no. 2, p. 131-137. Link. Best free paper on the Kohl’s Ranch paleo site Naco fossils. Irmis, R. B., & Elliott, D. K. (2006). Taphonomy of a Middle Pennsylvanian Marine Vertebrate Assemblage and an Actualistic Model for Marine Abrasion of Teeth. Palaios, 21(5), 466-479. Great pictures of shark teeth and the outcrops they appear in. Link. Lundin, Robert F. and Colin Sumrall. (1999). Ostrocodes From The Naco Formation (Upper Carboniferous) At The Kohl Ranch Locality, Central Arizona. Journal of Paleontology. 73. 454-460. link. Microfossils from classic now gone site. Reid, A.M. (1968). Biostratigraphy of the Naco Formation (Pennsylvanian) of South-Central Arizona. Ph.D. Dissertation - The University of Arizona. (340 pages) link. Micropaleontology only. Reid, A.M. (1966). Stratigraphy and Paleontology of the Naco Formation in the Southern Dripping Springs Mountains, Near Winkelman, Gila County, Arizona. Masters Thesis - The University of Arizona. link One of best papers on Naco fossils. Lists many species and has so so photos. Neuman, Ben. Pictorial Guide to Upper Pennsylvanian Fossils. in conjunction with the Dallas Paleontological Society link. Great photos of fossils; some found in the Naco. Webster, G. D. (1981). New Crinoids from the Naco Formation (Middle Pennsylvanian) of Arizona and a Revision of the Family Cromyocrinidae. Journal of Paleontology 55:1176-1199. Arizona Chris' TFF posts link Martin Formation Geolex Publications. link. Beus, S. (1978). Late Devonian (Frasnian) Invertebrate Fossils from the Jerome Member of the Martin Formation, Verde Valley, Arizona. Journal of Paleontology, 52(1), 40-54. link Great resource with photos. Hussakof, L. (1942). Fishes from the Devonian of Arizona. American Museum Novitates, Number 1186. link Mentions Mt. Eldon Fauna near Flagstaff. Huddle, J.W. and E. Dobrovolny (1952). Devonian and Mississippian Rocks of Central Arizona. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 233-D. link Great stratigraphy paper. Helps to identify several fossil bearing formations in northern Arizona. Mentions several fossil bearing areas. Stoyanow, A., 1948. Molluscan faunule from Devonian Island Mesa Beds, Arizona. Journal of Paleontology 22(6):783-791 Stumm, Erwin C., (1948). Upper Devonian Compound Tetracoral from the Martin Limestone. Journal of Paleontology, Vol. 22:1, pp. 40-47. link Meader, N.M. (1977). Paleoecology and Paleoenvironments of the Upper Devonian Martin Formation in the Roosevelt Dam-Globe Area, Gila County, Arizona. Masters Thesis - The University of Arizona. link. Mentions many fossils and several sites where they are found. Views of the Mahantango link link link link link link link link Blog by TFF member with photos about collecting near Payson. Several articles. Escabrosa Formation Geolex Publications. link Redwall Formation Geolex Publication link Brezinski, David. (2017). Trilobites from the Redwall Limestone (Mississippian) of Arizona. Annals of Carnegie Museum. 84. 165-171. link Best paper for Redwall trilobites. Carter, John L., David K. Brezinski, Albert D. Kollar and J. Thomas Dutro Jr. (2014). Brachiopoda Taxonomy and Biostratigraphy of the Redwall Limestone (Lower Mississippian) of Arizona. Annals of Carnegie Museum 82(3):257-290. link The best article for Redwall brachiopods. Easton, W. H. and Gutschick, R. C. (1953). Corals from the Redwall Limestone (Mississippian) of Arizona. Bulletin of the Southern California Academy of Sciences: Vol. 52: Iss. 1. link Quality paper for descriptions, pictures and localities of corals. Huddle, J.W. and E. Dobrovolny. (1952). Devonian and Mississippian Rocks of Central Arizona. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 233-D. link Great stratigraphy paper. Helps to identify several fossil bearing formations in northern Arizona. Mentions several fossil bearing areas. McKee, Edwin D., Raymond C. Gutschick and Betty Skipp. (1969). History of the Redwall Limestone of Northern Arizona. Volume 114 of Memoir (Geological Society of America) link Best all around paper for the paleontology of the Redwall. Behind paywall. Bowsher, A. (1954). The Stratigraphic Significance of a Crinoid from the Redwall Limestone of Arizona. Journal of Paleontology, 28(1), 113-116. link Sando, William J. (1963). New Species of Colonial Rugose Corals from the Mississippian of Northern Arizona. Journal of Paleontology, v. 37, no. 5, p.1074-1079, plates. 145, 146, 1 fig. link Sando, William J. (1964). Stratigraphic importance of corals in the Redwall Limestone, Northern Arizona. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 501-C, p. C39-C42, 3 figs. link Schur, Chris. (1995). Transitional Lithology and Paleofauna for the Escabrosa and Redwall Limestone Contact in Central Arizona. Found in: Proceedings of the third annual Fossils of Arizona Symposium, November 18, 1995 / edited by Debra Boaz ... [et al.]. link. Great photos of fossils. Spencer, J.E., Richard, S.M., Ferguson, C.A., and Gilbert, W.G. (1999). Preliminary Bedrock Geologic Map and Cross Sections of the Windy Hill 7.5' Quadrangle, Gila County, Arizona. Arizona Geological Survey Open File Report, OFR-99-12, 1 map sheet, map scale 1:24,000. link Redwall is fossiliferous in the area. Schnebly Hill Formation Geolex Publication. link McGoon, Jr., D O. (1962). Occurrences of Paleozoic Carbonaceous Deposits in the Mogollon Rim Region. in Guidebook of the Mogollon Rim Region, East-Central Arizona, 1962: New Mexico Geological Society Thirteenth Field Conference, p. 90-91. link Pennsylvanian/Permian plant fossils. J. E. Canright and E. B. Blazey. (1974). A Lower Permian flora from Promontory Butte, Central Arizona. In S.R. Ash(ed.), Guidebook to Devonian, Permian and Triassic Plant Localities, East-central Arizona. Paleobotanical Section, Botanical Society of America, 25th Annual AIBS Meeting 57-62 [H. Sims/S. Ostrowski] Blazey, E.B., (1974), Fossil Flora of the Mogollon Rim, Central Arizona: Palaeontographica, v. B146, p. 1-20. Surprise Canyon Formation Hodnett, John-Paul & Elliott, David. (2018). Carboniferous Chondrichthyan Assemblages from the Surprise Canyon and Watahomigi formations (Latest Mississippian-Early Pennsylvanian) of the Western Grand Canyon, Northern Arizona. Journal of Paleontology. 92. 10.1017/jpa.2018.72. link Tidwell, W. D., J. R. Jennings, and S. S. Beus. (1992). A Carboniferous Flora from the Surprise Canyon Formation in the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Journal of Paleontology 66(6):1013-1021.
  8. Arizona Paleontology Papers

    Here is an annotated list of the best Arizona paleontology literature. Back to main page Precambrian Cambrian ISCS Field Conference (2011). Cambrian Stratigraphy and Paleontology of Northern Arizona and Southern Nevada. The 16th Field Conference of the Cambrian Stage Subdivision Working Group, International Subcommission on Cambrian Stratigraphy, Hollingsworth, J.S., F.A. Sundberg and J.R. Foster (eds.), Museum of Northern Arizona Bulletin 67. Devonian Huddle, J.W. and E. Dobrovolny (1952). Devonian and Mississippian Rocks of Central Arizona. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 233-D. link Great stratigraphy paper. Helps to identify several fossil bearing formations in northern Arizona. Mentions several fossil bearing areas. Hussakof, L. (1942). Fishes from the Devonian of Arizona. American Museum Novitates, Number 1186. link Mentions Mt. Eldon Fauna near Flaggstaff. Meader, N.M. (1977). Paleoecology and Paleoenvironments of the Upper Devonian Martin Formation in the Roosevelt Dam-Globe Area, Gila County, Arizona. Masters Thesis - The University of Arizona. link Mentions many fossils and severals sites where they are found. Carboniferous Dilliard, Kelly & Rigby, J.K.. (2001). The New Demosponges, Chaunactis olsoni and Haplistion nacoense, and Associated Sponges from the Pennsylvanian Naco Formation, Central Arizona. Brigham Young University Geology Studies. 46. 1-11. link Huddle, J.W. and E. Dobrovolny (1952). Devonian and Mississippian Rocks of Central Arizona. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 233-D. link Good overview of Devonian and Mississippian rocks. Easton, W. H. and Gutschick, R. C. (1953) Corals from the Redwall Limestone (Mississippian) of Arizona. Bulletin of the Southern California Academy of Sciences: Vol. 52: Iss. 1. link Quality paper for descriptions, pictures and localities of corals. Lundin, Robert F. and Colin Sumrall. (1999). Ostrocodes From The Naco Formation (Upper Carboniferous) At The Kohl Ranch Locality, Central Arizona. Journal of Paleontology. 73. 454-460. link Microfossils from classic now gone site. Irmis, R.B. and D.K. Elliott (2006). Taphonomy of a Middle Pennsylvanian Marine Vertebrate Assemblage and an Actualistic Model for Marine Abrasion of Teeth. Palaios, Vol.21. link Reid, A.M. (1968). Biostratigraphy of the Naco Formation (Pennsylvanian) of South-Central Arizona. Ph.D. Dissertation - The University of Arizona. (340 pages) link Micropaleontology only. Reid, A.M. (1966). Stratigraphy and Paleontology of the Naco Formation in the Southern Dripping Springs Mountains, Near Winkelman, Gila County, Arizona. Masters Thesis - The University of Arizona. link One of best papers on Naco fossils. Lists many species and has so so photos. Permian Chronic, Halka. (1952). Molluscan fauna from the Permian Kaibab Formation, Walnut Canyon, Arizona. Geological Society of America Bulletin 63. link Very good resource for molluscs. Graham, John. (2008). Walnut Canyon National Monument Geologic Resource Evaluation Report. Natural Resource Report NPS/NRPC/GRD/NRR—2008/040 Link Mostly info on Kaibab Formation fossils. Hunt, A.P., et al. (2005). Permian Vertebrates of Arizona. In: Vertebrate Paleontology in Arizona. Heckert, A.B. and S.G. Lucas (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin Number 29. link Vertebrates are not common in the Arizona Permian. Wilt, Jan Carol, (1969). Petrology and Stratigraphy of the Colina Limestone (Permian) in Cochise County, Arizona U of A MS thesis link Triassic Heckert, A.B. and S.G. Lucas (2003). Stratigraphy and Paleontology of the Lower Chinle Group (Adamanian: Latest Carnian) in the Vicinity of St. Johns, Arizona. In: New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 54th Field Conference, Geology of the Zuni Plateau. link Heckert, A.B., S.G. Lucas and A.P. Hunt (2005). Triassic Vertebrate Fossils in Arizona. In: Vertebrate Paleontology in Arizona (Heckert, A.B. and S.G. Lucas, eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin Number 29. link Kirby, R.E. (1989). Late Triassic Vertebrate Localities of the Owl Rock Member (Chinle Formation) in the Ward Terrace Area of Northern Arizona. In: Lucas, S.G., and Hunt, A.P., eds., Dawn of the age of dinosaurs in the American southwest New Mexico Museum of Natural History Martz, J.W. and W.G. Parker (2010). Revised Lithostratigraphy of the Sonsela Member (Chinle Formation, Upper Triassic) in the Southern Part of Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona. PLoS ONE, 5(2). link Parker, W.G. (2005). Faunal Review of the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation of Arizona. In: Vertebrate Paleontology of Arizona. McCord, R.D. (ed.), Mesa Southwest Bulletin, Number 11. link Spielmann, J.A., S.G. Lucas and A.B. Heckert (2007). Tetrapod Fauna of the Upper Triassic (Revueltian) Owl Rock Formation, Chinle Group, Arizona. In: The Global Triassic. Lucas, S.G. and J.A. Spielmann (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin 41. link Jurassic Irmis, R.B. (2005). A Review of the Vertebrate Fauna of the Lower Jurassic Navajo Sandstone in Arizona. In: Vertebrate Paleontology of Arizona. McCord, R.D. (ed.), Mesa Southwest Museum Bulletin Number 11. link Cretaceous Hattori, K.E. (2017). Architecture of a mid-Cretaceous patch reef: High resolution mapping provides new insight into facies geometries and ecological relationships at Paul Spur, Bisbee, Arizona. Masters Thesis - The University of Texas at Austin. link I would love to find some of the rudistid reefs. Hayes, P.T. (1970). Cretaceous Paleogeography of Southeastern Arizona and Adjacent Areas. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 658-B. link Arizona cannot compare to the fossil abundance of Texas. Lucas, S.G. and A.B. Heckert (2005). Distribution, Age and Correlation of Cretaceous Fossil Vertebrates from Arizona. In: Vertebrate Paleontology in Arizona. (Heckert, A.B. and S.G. Lucas, eds.) New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin Number 29. link Stoyanow, A. (1949). Lower Cretaceous Stratigraphy in Southeastern Arizona. Geological Society of America Memoir 38:1-156 Miocene Morgan, G.S. and R.S. White (2005). Miocene and Pliocene Vertebrates from Arizona. In: Vertebrate Paleontology in Arizona. (Heckert, A.B. and S.G. Lucas, eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin Number 29. link Pliocene Czaplewski, N.J. (2011). An Owl-Pellet Accumulation of Small Pliocene Vertebrates from the Verde Formation, Arizona, USA. Palaeontologia Electronica, Vol.14, Number 3. link Without owls we would not know much about the small vertebrate of the Verde Formation. Morgan, G.S. and R.S. White (2005). Miocene and Pliocene Vertebrates from Arizona. In: Vertebrate Paleontology in Arizona. (Heckert, A.B. and S.G. Lucas, eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin Number 29. link White, R.S. and G.S. Morgan (2005). Arizona Blancan Vertebrate Faunas in Regional Perspective. In: Vertebrate Paleontology of Arizona. (McCord, R.D., ed.), Mesa Southwest Museum Bulletin Number 11. link Arizona has a rich Blancan flora. General Gidley, J.W. (1925). Fossil Proboscidea and Edentata of the San Pedro Valley, Arizona. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 140-B. link Gidley, J.W. (1922). Preliminary Report on Fossil Vertebrates of the San Pedro Valley, Arizona, with Descriptions of New Species of Rodentia and Lagomorpha. U.S. Geological Society - Shorter Contributions to General Geology. link Lindsay, E.H. (1984). Windows to the Past: Fossils of the San Pedro Valley. Fieldnotes from the Arizona Bureau of Geology and Mineral Technology, Vol.14, Number 4. link Thrasher, L.C. Fossils of the San Simon Valley, Graham County, Arizona. U.S. Bureau of Land Management. link Twenter, F.R. New Fossil Localities in the Verde Formation, Verde Valley, Arizona. New Mexico Geological Society, Thirteenth Field Conference. link Wilt, J. and D. Schumacher (1993). Fossils of the Paleozoic Formations of Southeastern Arizona. link
  9. Hello all, Despite three years of 'slimming down my collection' (no such thing has remotely occurred--the end goal is a nicer collection but fewer pieces), I am pretty slim on fossil literature! I am looking to expand my library, and I am happy to trade for books--I will look into purchasing them, but ideally I can hit two birds one stone . I am mainly looking for books on paleozoic invertebrates, but I would take a look at anything! English, Spanish, and Russian (my' edem v Rossiyu, leto 2018!), but English is primarily what I'm hunting. To trade, I have a little bit of everything--trilobites, fish, ammonites, ferns, and plenty more, with the exceptions of dinosaur material and shark teeth. If you're looking for something specific I will let you know what I have and send pictures your way . Reese
  10. Books for a beginner

    Hi there, I'd like to learn more about paleontology and was wondering which books would you recommend for a beginner? I'm looking for books on ammonites, trilobites and dinosaur paleobiology. Also are there any books on Ankylosaurids around? Thank you for your help. There are so many books I don't know where to start. Jojo
  11. Hey all, I've recently caught the "fossil bug", and I have been looking at geologic maps online to help determine potential hunting locations. Is anyone aware of an exhaustive website, book, etc. that labels stratigraphy? If not, what do y'all use to determine the age of certain locations/formations? Any advice is appreciated! Thanks, Caleb
  12. I just came across an add-on on Firefox that makes searching for literature convenient: https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/google-scholar-button/ It adds a button to the top right corner of your Firefox. When you are reading something on the web that mentions a paper, you can highlight the title mentioned and click the button, and a little window will pop up showing you the Google Scholar search result of that paper. Or, if you are already on a paper but it is a paid site you don't have subscription to, you can click the button and it will show you where you can get the full text. And if you click on that quotation mark button on the top right of the pop-up window, it will create the citation of that paper for you in a few different citation styles. Very handy if you are writing a paper.
  13. Dear Forum members, I have been extending my permian cephalopod collection in the past weeks, but I think that some of the genus and species are incorrect. Unfortunately I see similar looking cephalopods on the internet with different names, and I can't find good descriptive catalogues of all these permian cephalopods from Kazakhstan and Timor. Therefore I was wondering on which papers you base your identification. Thanks in advance, Sander
  14. Hi All, Long time Paleontology enthusiast but first time poster on The Fossil Forums (thanks for having me!). Was wondering if any of the members had recommendations on books about dinosaurs, trilobites, prehistoric life? I have searched this forum and also gone to amazon lists and book rating sites and I'm having a tough time finding some real recommendations that are more words than pictures! I'm looking for recommendations on novels that go through the history, evolution, or lives of prehistoric life or extinction. Does anyone have any must-reads? Thanks! Matt
  15. Fossils And Fossil Collectors In Literature.

    Article about fossil collecting in fiction. John Mullan's ten of the best: fossils Fossils turn up in all sorts of places, from 8th-century satire to modern historical fiction by John Mullan, The Guardian, March 9, 2012 http://www.guardian....e?newsfeed=true Yours, Paul H.
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