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Found 9 results

  1. Trilobite Fossil Redlichia

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Redlichia chinensis Trilobite Balang Formation, Hunan province, China Lower Cambrian Redlichia is a genus of redlichiid trilobite in the family Redlichiidae, with large to very large species (up to 35 centimetres or 14 inches long). Fossils of various species are found in Lower Cambrian (Toyonian)-aged marine strata from China, Korea, Pakistan, the Himalayas, Iran, Spain, southern Siberia, and Antarctica, and from Middle Cambrian (Ordian)-aged marine strata of Australia. Redlichia has a rather flat and thinly calcified dorsal exoskeleton of inverted egg-shaped outline, about 1½× longer than wide, measured across the base of the genal spines and disregarding the spine on the 11th segment of the articulated middle part of the body (or thorax). The headshield (or cephalon) is semicircular, about ⅓× as long as the body, with clear genal spines that are a smooth continuation of the border, that extend backward and outward and curving to be near parallel near their tips, which typically extend to the backhalf of the articulated middle part of the body (or thorax). The thorax consists of 11-17 segments, with the 11th from the front bearing a backward directed spine on the midline. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Redlichiida Suborder: †Redlichiina Family: †Redlichiidae Genus: †Redlichia Species: †chinensis
  2. Trilobite Fossil Redlichia

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Redlichia chinensis Trilobite Balang Formation, Hunan province, China Lower Cambrian Redlichia is a genus of redlichiid trilobite in the family Redlichiidae, with large to very large species (up to 35 centimetres or 14 inches long). Fossils of various species are found in Lower Cambrian (Toyonian)-aged marine strata from China, Korea, Pakistan, the Himalayas, Iran, Spain, southern Siberia, and Antarctica, and from Middle Cambrian (Ordian)-aged marine strata of Australia. Redlichia has a rather flat and thinly calcified dorsal exoskeleton of inverted egg-shaped outline, about 1½× longer than wide, measured across the base of the genal spines and disregarding the spine on the 11th segment of the articulated middle part of the body (or thorax). The headshield (or cephalon) is semicircular, about ⅓× as long as the body, with clear genal spines that are a smooth continuation of the border, that extend backward and outward and curving to be near parallel near their tips, which typically extend to the backhalf of the articulated middle part of the body (or thorax). The thorax consists of 11-17 segments, with the 11th from the front bearing a backward directed spine on the midline. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Redlichiida Suborder: †Redlichiina Family: †Redlichiidae Genus: †Redlichia Species: †chinensis
  3. Adam's Cambrian

    A rangeomorph holdfast trace fossil from the Ediacara formation, Rawnsley quartzite of the Flinders Range, South Australia. This specimen is Medusina mawsoni, so called because it was until recently thought to be a jellyfish, but is now believed to be the attachment point of a fractal rangeomorph as Charniodiscus is the point of anchorage for Charnia sp. This one may have been the holdfast point for some species of Rangea. The diameter of the outer circle is 1.5 cm and the fossil is estimated to be 555 million years old.
  4. Archaeocyathid

    About 515 million years old, this archaeocyathid shows excellent specimens with both lateral and vertical sections. The internal septa separating the internal wall from the external wall can clearly be seen and the central cavity. Archaeocyatha
  5. Parsley, R. & Zhao, Y. (2006): Long Stalked Eocrinoids in the Basal Middle Cambrian Kaili Biota, Taijiang County, Guizhou Province, China. Journal of Paleontology Vol. 80, No. 6, pp. 1058-1071. Lin, J.-P., Ausich, W. & Zhao, J.-L. (2008): Settling strategy of stalked echinoderms from the Kaili Biota (middle Cambrian), Guizhou Province, South China. Palaeogeography Palaeoclimatology Palaeoecology 258(3):213-221.
  6. Not 100% sure what it is - could be either a rare Yunnanozoon lividum Hou, Ramsköld & Bergström, 1991, a Hemichordate or - more likely Haikouella lanceolata Chen, Huang & Li, 1999, a Chordate. Even Haikouichthys ercaicunensis Shu, Conway Morris, Han & Zhang, a primitive fish, is still a posibility. Under UV light Reconstruction of Haikouella (from Wikipedia): Reconstruction of Haikouichthys (from Wikipedia): Lit.: Degan Shu, et al. A New Species of Yunnanozoan with Implications for Deuterostome Evolution. Science 299, 1380 (2003) World heritage nomination: Chengjiang Fossil Site
  7. The United States Geological Survey Tenth Annual Report (1889), Part 1- Geology page 511 to page 763, also includes 20 fossil plates, one folded USA map with Lower Cambrian exposures (large scale but gets you started). Invertebrates found and trilobites. The text describes the characteristics to identify Lower Cambrian invertebrates (1889 terminology, so some may be corrected after this was published). The map of the USA shows outcrops known from New England to Nevada, along the Appalachians and heavily covered for Wisconsin and some Minnesota. Those living in the Wisconsin and Minnesota area must have outcrops in their basements! This is a reference to get you started to narrow down exposures that you might have access. I had a neighbor who stopped at a fast food restaurant in Wisconsin and showed me a slab with something on it... an Olenellus trilobite! He could not remember which town, but if he could find one... you will find them. Fauna of the Lower Cambrian or Olenellus Zone is the title by Charles D. Walcott. This is just one part of a volume. Find a copy at your library and make some notes and photocopy the map of the USA. Follow the text for areas you may be familiar. These Lower Cambrian trilobites are very interesting to look at and can provide many hours of walking outcrops. I add two plates, upside down due to scanner options, and take a good look at just some of the possibilities!
  8. Yunnanocephalus yunnanensis (Mansuy, 1912) Trilobite fossil with soft Tissue About 2.5 cm Preserved legs and gills. Lower Cambrian Chengjiang Biota, Qiongzhusi Formation, Maotianshan Shales, Yunnan Province, China I looked at this closer once the specimen arrived last week and I found a whole bunch of gills shown along some other exposed exopods. The item coming out of cephalon top was actually another endopod. Here is another specimen (whole) just to show you the whole Yunnanocephalus: EDIT: Images removed by topic starter
  9. Graptolites ? (Chengjiang Biota ?)

    Hello, here are two different specimens I bought 2 – 3 years ago from a trustworthy Chinese dealer via ebay; the specimens were labelled as lower Cambrian (Chengjiang biota): Quiongszhusi Section Heilinpu Formation Locality : Maotianshan They look like graptolites from the order Graptoloidea. However, the earliest graptoloidea are known from the lowermost ordovician. Meanwhile, a pterobranchia from the order Rhabdopleurida was described from the Atdabanian of the Chengjiang biota (Galeaplumosus) as the earliest pterobranchia; however, this is not a graptolite, only a close relative. Thus, it became clear that no real graptolites are known (described) from the Chengjiang biota. This rises several possibilities: (i) the fossils shown here are not graptolites, but something different (but what?) (ii) the fossils are the oldest graptolites/graptoloidea and so far undescribed. However, this seems extremely unlikely since several specimens of that kind were sold and (as is shown on one specimen) they don’t seem to be rare; so it’s very improbable that they were not noticed until now. (iii) the fossils are indeed graptoloid graptolites, but from younger strata (Ordovician, Silurian?) and locality and stratigraphic information are wrong. However, the seller seemed trustworthy to me with a lot of knowledge about the fossils from his area and hunts fossils in the field himself (though I don’t know whether he collected these two specimens himself). Mislabelling may happen more easily if fossils are sold second hand. I prefer (iii), but perhaps somebody may know more about these fossils or where they come from. Thanks! araucaria1959
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