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Found 42 results

  1. Think it's a tooth, but should it be?

    17 August 2019 Shark tooth? Lower Cretaceous - Walnut formation Western Bell County, Texas, USA I found this in the nearby park where I've found many of the normal central Texas fossils over the years (oxytropidocerous, salenia, parasmilia, heart urchins, gastropods, snails, etc.). My eyes tell me this thing looks a lot like a shark tooth. But my brain is trying to get me to disagree. Here's why I'm stumped: 1. While it makes sense that shark tooth fossils COULD be found in this area, along with all of the other sea life, we aren't known for turning up many teeth. In fact, I've not found any in this area yet and haven't really heard of others finding them around here either. 2. The shark teeth I have found in other areas, such as Post Oak Creek, have all looked . . . well, like fossilized shark teeth. This one looks like the chalky limestone in which it was found. Which has me wondering if it's a tooth or not. I welcome your input.
  2. I Finally Found One!

    I've known about these little dudes for years, but they've always been like the Yeti to me: heard of them, believed in their existence, but never laid eyes on one for myself. Well, this evening I decided to accompany the fam on a walk/bike ride at the park that is two blocks down the road (referenced in previous topics/posts). I've been finding some interesting coral specimens down there lately and was looking fairly close to the ground, somewhat stooping against the gentle slope. . . . and there she was! In all of her 9 mm of chalky limestone beauty! My wife's comment was "I don't understand how you even see those tiny little things." I replied, "well, for the past 11 years, I haven't!" 11 August 2019 Salenia texana (in matrix) Lower Cretaceous Commanche Peak fm. Western Bell County, Texas, USA
  3. A Cross-section of Something, Perhaps?

    This peculiar thing caught my eye while I was out looking for urchins, clams, gastropods and all of the other bountiful fossil blessings of Central Texas. This was in an intermittent creek cut in the Comanche Peak formation, Lower Cretaceous period, western Bell County, Texas. The scale in the background is inches (sorry, no metric device readily available). The oval shape of the fossil is 1.5 cm by 1 cm. All of the lines you see making up the fossil are crystalized sediment within the limestone matrix. My 8 year old was excited about how "sparkly" it looked under the flashlight. In a couple of the pictures you can see what appears to be a very small section of the side of the fossil. I am stumped on this one. My hunch is that i'm seeing the inside of an organism that we typically get to see the outside of. But i don't know what the insides of the urchins look like. Seems too oval to be a cross section of phymosoma texanum. Maybe it was a plant or coral? Could it be a flattened-out, crystalized Parasmilia?
  4. https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-12/uoc-to121418.php
  5. Chinese bird with preserved (?)lungs

    This is rather interesting - a specimen of the bird Archeorhynchus spathula (STM7-11) from the Lower Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation (northeastern China) has been shown to have probable evidence of preserved lungs Wang, X., O’Connor, J. K., Maina, J. N., Pan, Y., Wang, M., Wang, Y., Zheng, X., & Zhou, Z. (2018). Archaeorhynchus preserving significant soft tissue including probable fossilized lungs. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201805803. Wang etal 2018 Archaeorhynchus lungs.pdf
  6. I found this plate of oysters I don't know the name of in the Lower Cretaceous Grayson Formation exposure at Rayzor Ranch in Denton Texas. I showed it to @trempie4 in August and @Jeffrey P when he was here in September and neither one wanted it so I finally took it home myself. As I was exposing more of the oysters I first noticed these nice little serpula on and around the oysters. Then I noticed something I haven't seen before. i wonder if it could be some kind of feeding trace. Any ideas?
  7. Lower Cretaceous form

    Found this little item in my rock bar that has me stumped. Has too much form to be a "concretion", but not enough to try to get a bone ID. It came from a Maryland Creek in the Arundel "formation" Potomac "group".
  8. Ironstone from MD

    I will leave this without comment also, for your interpretation.
  9. Arundel/ Patuxent find

    I will leave this for your interpretation without comment.
  10. A couple of relatively nice Oxytropidoceras sp ammonites I found on a spring hunt with the Dallas Palaeontological Society to Oliver Creek in Denton County, Texas a couple of years ago.
  11. An interesting discovery in Japan https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2018/02/04/national/science-health/cranial-bones-three-horned-dinosaurs-found-western-japan/
  12. I saw this article earlier today. If someone has already posted it I give my apologies for reposting it, but I think it is an interesting article on: “A diverse mammal-dominated, footprint assemblage from wetland deposits in the Lower Cretaceous of Maryland” It is published in Nature. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-18619-w
  13. Tylostoma tumidum Gastropod cast a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Tylostoma tumidum Gastropod cast SITE LOCATION: Mills County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Tylostomatidae is an extinct family of fossil sea snails, marine gastropod molluscs in the superfamily Stromboidea, the true conchs and their allies. Genera within the family Tylostomatidae include: Tylostoma, the type genus. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: Littorinimorpha (Infraorder) Family: †Tylostomatidae Genus: †Tylostoma Species: †tumidum
  14. Tylostoma tumidum Gastropod cast a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Tylostoma tumidum Gastropod cast SITE LOCATION: Mills County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Tylostomatidae is an extinct family of fossil sea snails, marine gastropod molluscs in the superfamily Stromboidea, the true conchs and their allies. Genera within the family Tylostomatidae include: Tylostoma, the type genus. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: Littorinimorpha (Infraorder) Family: †Tylostomatidae Genus: †Tylostoma Species: †tumidum
  15. Loriolia echinoid Fossil a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Loriolia echinoid Fossil SITE LOCATION: Comal County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Loriolia is a genus of extinct sea urchins from the Emiratiidae family. The Emiratiidae are a family of extinct sea urchins (Echinoidea) of the order Phymosomatoida. The Phymosomatoida are an order of sea urchins, found in Europe, North America, North Africa and the Middle East. They are distinguished from other sea urchins by the presence of large fused plates on top of the feeding lantern. The test is usually sculpted to some degree, but, unlike their close relatives the Temnopleuroida, the tubercles are never perforated. The opening in the test through which the anus passes, known as the periproct, is unusually large in sea urchins from this group. The apical disc, around the mouth, is only loosely attached to the rest of the test and is often missing in fossil species, giving the false impression that they also have a large oral opening Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Echinoidea Order: Phymosomatoida Family: †Emiratiidae Genus: †Loriolia
  16. Loriolia echinoid Fossil a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Loriolia echinoid Fossil SITE LOCATION: Comal County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Loriolia is a genus of extinct sea urchins from the Emiratiidae family. The Emiratiidae are a family of extinct sea urchins (Echinoidea) of the order Phymosomatoida. The Phymosomatoida are an order of sea urchins, found in Europe, North America, North Africa and the Middle East. They are distinguished from other sea urchins by the presence of large fused plates on top of the feeding lantern. The test is usually sculpted to some degree, but, unlike their close relatives the Temnopleuroida, the tubercles are never perforated. The opening in the test through which the anus passes, known as the periproct, is unusually large in sea urchins from this group. The apical disc, around the mouth, is only loosely attached to the rest of the test and is often missing in fossil species, giving the false impression that they also have a large oral opening Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Echinoidea Order: Phymosomatoida Family: †Emiratiidae Genus: †Loriolia
  17. Tapes decepta Mollusk Cast a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Tapes decepta Mollusk Cast SITE LOCATION: Glen Rose Formation, Bandera County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Clams and their relatives (oysters, scallops, and mussels) are often called bivalves (or bivalved mollusks) because their shell is composed of two parts called valves. Bivalves have a long history. Their fossils first appear in rocks that date to the middle of the Cambrian Period, about 510 million years ago. Although the group became increasingly abundant about 400 million years ago during the Devonian Period, bivalves really took off following the massive extinction at the close of the Permian Period. Modern bivalves live in a variety of marine and freshwater environments, from the shallow waters near shore to great depths in the ocean. Fossils indicate that bivalves have occupied most of these environments for more than 450 million years, but during the Paleozoic Era they were especially common in near-shore environments. The Veneridae or venerids, common name the venus clams, are a very large family of minute to large, saltwater clams, marine bivalve molluscs. Over 500 living species of venerid bivalves are known, most of which are edible, and many of which are exploited as food sources. Many of the most important edible species are commonly known (in the USA) simply as "clams". Venerids make up a significant proportion of the world fishery of edible bivalves. The family includes some species that are important commercially, such as (in the USA) the hard clam or quahog, Mercenaria mercenaria. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Veneroida Family: Veneridae Genus: Tapes Species: decepta
  18. Tapes decepta Mollusk Cast a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Tapes decepta Mollusk Cast SITE LOCATION: Glen Rose Formation, Bandera County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Clams and their relatives (oysters, scallops, and mussels) are often called bivalves (or bivalved mollusks) because their shell is composed of two parts called valves. Bivalves have a long history. Their fossils first appear in rocks that date to the middle of the Cambrian Period, about 510 million years ago. Although the group became increasingly abundant about 400 million years ago during the Devonian Period, bivalves really took off following the massive extinction at the close of the Permian Period. Modern bivalves live in a variety of marine and freshwater environments, from the shallow waters near shore to great depths in the ocean. Fossils indicate that bivalves have occupied most of these environments for more than 450 million years, but during the Paleozoic Era they were especially common in near-shore environments. The Veneridae or venerids, common name the venus clams, are a very large family of minute to large, saltwater clams, marine bivalve molluscs. Over 500 living species of venerid bivalves are known, most of which are edible, and many of which are exploited as food sources. Many of the most important edible species are commonly known (in the USA) simply as "clams". Venerids make up a significant proportion of the world fishery of edible bivalves. The family includes some species that are important commercially, such as (in the USA) the hard clam or quahog, Mercenaria mercenaria. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Veneroida Family: Veneridae Genus: Tapes Species: decepta
  19. Heteraster texanus Echinoid a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Heteraster texanus Echinoid SITE LOCATION: Commanche Park Formation, Mills County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Heteraster is an extinct genus of sea urchins belonging to the family Toxasteridae. These slow-moving shallow infaunal deposit feeder-detritivores lived during the Cretaceous period. Fossils of this family have been found in the sediments of Algeria, Egypt, France, Hungary, Mexico, Peru, Portugal, Serbia and Montenegro, Spain, Switzerland and Yemen. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Echinoidea Order: Spatangoida Family: †Toxasteridae Genus: †Heteraster Species: †texanus
  20. Heteraster texanus Echinoid a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Heteraster texanus Echinoid SITE LOCATION: Commanche Park Formation, Mills County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Heteraster is an extinct genus of sea urchins belonging to the family Toxasteridae. These slow-moving shallow infaunal deposit feeder-detritivores lived during the Cretaceous period. Fossils of this family have been found in the sediments of Algeria, Egypt, France, Hungary, Mexico, Peru, Portugal, Serbia and Montenegro, Spain, Switzerland and Yemen. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Echinoidea Order: Spatangoida Family: †Toxasteridae Genus: †Heteraster Species: †texanus
  21. Kingena Brachiopod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Kingena Brachiopod SITE LOCATION: Main St. Formation, Johnson County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Kingena is an extinct genus of brachiopods that lived from the Cretaceous to the early Paleocene in Antarctica, Europe, North America, and New Zealand. Terebratulids are one of only three living orders of articulate brachiopods, the others being the Rhynchonellida and the Thecideida. Craniida and Lingulida include living brachiopods, but are inarticulates. The name, Terebratula, may be derived from the Latin "terebra", meaning "hole-borer". The perceived resemblance of terebratulid shells to ancient Roman oil lamps gave the brachiopods their common name "lamp shell". Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: Terebratulida Family: †Kingenidae Genus: †Kingena
  22. Kingena Brachiopod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Kingena Brachiopod SITE LOCATION: Main St. Formation, Johnson County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Kingena is an extinct genus of brachiopods that lived from the Cretaceous to the early Paleocene in Antarctica, Europe, North America, and New Zealand. Terebratulids are one of only three living orders of articulate brachiopods, the others being the Rhynchonellida and the Thecideida. Craniida and Lingulida include living brachiopods, but are inarticulates. The name, Terebratula, may be derived from the Latin "terebra", meaning "hole-borer". The perceived resemblance of terebratulid shells to ancient Roman oil lamps gave the brachiopods their common name "lamp shell". Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: Terebratulida Family: †Kingenidae Genus: †Kingena
  23. Texigryphaea marcoui bivalve a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Texigryphaea marcoui bivalve SITE LOCATION: Mills County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Gryphaea, common name Devil's toenails, is a genus of extinct oysters, marine bivalve mollusks in the family Gryphaeidae. These fossils range from the Triassic to the Tertiary periods, but are mostly restricted to the Triassic and Jurassic. Both periods belong to the era Mesozoic. They are particularly common in many parts of Britain. These oysters lived on the sea bed in shallow waters, possibly in large colonies. The complete fossils consist of two articulated valves: a larger gnarly-shaped shell (the "toenail") and a smaller, flattened shell, the "lid". The soft parts of the animal occupied the cavity between the two shells, just like modern oysters. The shells also feature prominent growth bands. The larger, curved shell sat within the mud on the sea floor. These shells are sometimes found in fossil plates along with Turritella, clams, and sometimes sharks' teeth and fossilized fish scales. Its distribution is common in areas of both Europe and North America. A classic location to find these fossils is Redcar, on the northeast coast of England. There used to be a common folk belief that carrying one of these fossils could prevent rheumatism. They are also found in abundance in the state of Kansas in riverbeds and cliffs as well as the Big Horn Canyon of Wyoming and Montana. The benthic, free-living oyster Texigryphaea was the dominant constituent of many late Albian marine communities in the Texas and southern Western Interior regions. Large topotypic assemblages of three common lower–middle Washita Group species (T. navia and T. pitcheri in Oklahoma and T. tucumcarii in New Mexico) each display considerable morphological variation in valve shape and the proportions and expression of various features. Variation within an assemblage is partly due to ontogenetic changes but is mainly ecophenotypic, with local variation in nature of substrate, water turbulence, length of attachment time, and other factors influencing the final morphology of the mature shell. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Ostreoida Family: Gryphaeidae Genus: †Texigryphaea Species: †marcoui
  24. Texigryphaea marcoui bivalve a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Texigryphaea marcoui bivalve SITE LOCATION: Mills County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Gryphaea, common name Devil's toenails, is a genus of extinct oysters, marine bivalve mollusks in the family Gryphaeidae. These fossils range from the Triassic to the Tertiary periods, but are mostly restricted to the Triassic and Jurassic. Both periods belong to the era Mesozoic. They are particularly common in many parts of Britain. These oysters lived on the sea bed in shallow waters, possibly in large colonies. The complete fossils consist of two articulated valves: a larger gnarly-shaped shell (the "toenail") and a smaller, flattened shell, the "lid". The soft parts of the animal occupied the cavity between the two shells, just like modern oysters. The shells also feature prominent growth bands. The larger, curved shell sat within the mud on the sea floor. These shells are sometimes found in fossil plates along with Turritella, clams, and sometimes sharks' teeth and fossilized fish scales. Its distribution is common in areas of both Europe and North America. A classic location to find these fossils is Redcar, on the northeast coast of England. There used to be a common folk belief that carrying one of these fossils could prevent rheumatism. They are also found in abundance in the state of Kansas in riverbeds and cliffs as well as the Big Horn Canyon of Wyoming and Montana. The benthic, free-living oyster Texigryphaea was the dominant constituent of many late Albian marine communities in the Texas and southern Western Interior regions. Large topotypic assemblages of three common lower–middle Washita Group species (T. navia and T. pitcheri in Oklahoma and T. tucumcarii in New Mexico) each display considerable morphological variation in valve shape and the proportions and expression of various features. Variation within an assemblage is partly due to ontogenetic changes but is mainly ecophenotypic, with local variation in nature of substrate, water turbulence, length of attachment time, and other factors influencing the final morphology of the mature shell. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Ostreoida Family: Gryphaeidae Genus: †Texigryphaea Species: †marcoui
  25. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ilymatogyra ram's horn oyster fossil SITE LOCATION: Del Rio, Texas TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: The Gryphaeidae, common name the foam oysters or honeycomb oysters, are a family of marine bivalve mollusks, and are a kind of true oyster. This family of bivalves is very well represented in the fossil record, however the number of living species is very few. All species have shells cemented to a substrate. Shells are considered brittle, inequivalve, with the left, lower (cemented) valve convex and the right (upper, non-cemented) valve flat or slightly concave. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Ostreida Family: †Gryphaeidae Genus: †Ilymatogyra
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