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Found 14 results

  1. Tracking Traces of Permian Coast Life

    Here is a short trip to keep those of us still in quarantine entertained. I collected this before our quarantine started. Something I have wanted for a while ever since seeing one but was not able to collect was in my trip through Utah's Paleozoic (link here: ) is a trace fossil called Skolithos. For those without much experience with trace fossils, Skolithos is a vertical tubelike burrow in sand on a sandy high-energy beach. The little critters would have to dig relatively deep vertical burrows so that they weren't washed away the next time a storm rolled through. A common name for this particular trace fossil is “piperock” because the number burrows could get dense enough in one area that the rock looks a bundle of straws. Just like a lot of trace fossils, it is not certain what made these burrows but it is known that it probably went extinct at the end of the Cretaceous as there are not any specimens after the dinosaurs’ doomsday. My particular specimen is made of calcareous sandstone that has been slightly metamorphosed into a quartzite. It is most likely from the Lower Permian of the Oquirrh Group based on the location and the nearby rock formation it appeared to have fallen out of but I found it in a gravel pile from the shoreline of Lake Bonneville so the exact stratigraphy is unknown.
  2. More Permian Waurika Finds

    So, I have some more finds from the Permian matrix. A few coprolites, and some teeth. Scales and bones I may put up in another post. Thanks for looking... Squares are 5mm x 5mm Orthocanthus teeth? Miscellaneous teeth ...
  3. Permian coprolite from Waurika

    Thanks to my friend @Jeffrey P ! He had given me some matrix that he collected at the Lower Permian Waurika Oklahoma site on his epic road trip this summer. I have spent some time breaking down the clay matrix, and going through the remaining bits to look for fossils. I've found a few teeth so far, but this was pretty cool. I was putting some hunks of matrix into different solutions to try to break down the clay, and came across this larger solid bit. Upon cleaning it, I realized it mus be a coprolite. It has many inclusions, Orthocanthus teeth, what appear to be bone bits, and fish scales. @Carl @GeschWhat may be interested in this. Enjoy! Matrix from the Lower Permian Wellington - Garbar Complex Note: each square on the background is 5mm by 5mm Coprolite is 2 cm long.
  4. Lepidodendron oculus felis

    I was give these two pieces by a frirend who cliamed they are both from the same Shanxi formation ( lower permian, like missisippi in US) in Yangquan, a well known coal mine in North China. He said they are just two pierces of the same thing ( Lepidodendron oculus felis). I found it hard to swallow, as the two pieces look rather different. however after some digging into literrature, it seems he is backed by many old scholars (not all, though) including Kawasaki, Stockmans and Mathieu. The last two pics I got from an old book, which look rather similar to mine, are considered by these researchers as belonging to the same species, although they are rather far between in loacation and age ( from upper carbon to upper permian). please enlighten me.
  5. Richard’s Spur Oklahoma

    Hi All I though I would do a little post. Sorry if the information is a little lacking but I have been ill and had an emergency operation . I am fine now but still on the meds and I thus get a little confused. I purchased to occupy myself some Micro Matrix from the Lower Permian Richard's Spur locality of Oklahoma. Fossils range from fragments to complete and include toe bones, jaws, skull plates, teeth, intercentra, limb bone ends etc. The majority of specimens are Captorhinus magnus and C. aguti but undoubtedly there are other species. I am sorry but I am unable to identify them but I really enjoyed doing the photos so I thought I would share my finds with you guys. Cheers Bobby
  6. I've been exploring a lower Permian site I think may have intermittently been a shallow marine environment. The location is Eastern Flint Hills, Kansas. What type and size of creatures would indicate a shallow or shoreline environment? Thanks ahead of time for any information.
  7. Teeny tiny bone

    I have admittedly crappy pictures of a tiny bone. My microscope is not special. I'm hoping someone knows this from it's shape. Graph paper background 5mm square. It's probably marine, but not sure. Appears to be a vertebra. Cottonwood Ls Mbr, Council Grove group. Lower Permian, Kansas.
  8. ID Microfossil

    Hoping to ID the central object in this photo. It appears to be broken towards the narrower end. It has grooves running the length of it. It's approximately 1 mm or less in length. Lower Permian, Cottonwood member, Council grove group, Kansas.
  9. I found this on hilltop in Wreford Formation. I've never seen this before and at first I thought it was Acanthocladia. It's not. Has anyone seen this type before? Lower Permian, Wreford formation, Kansas. 904 bryozoan.bmp
  10. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Dimetrodon limbatus vertebral sail spine section SITE LOCATION: Wellington Garbar Complex, Waurika, Oklahoma, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Permian (252.2-298.9 million years ago) Data: Dimetrodon (meaning "two measures of teeth") is an extinct genus of synapsids that lived during the Cisuralian (Early) Permian, around 295–272 million years ago (Ma). It is a member of the family Sphenacodontidae. The most prominent feature of Dimetrodon is the large neural spine sail on its back formed by elongated spines extending from the vertebrae. It walked on four legs and had a tall, curved skull with large teeth of different sizes set along the jaws. Most fossils have been found in the southwestern United States, the majority coming from a geological deposit called the Red Beds of Texas and Oklahoma. More recently, fossils have been found in Germany. Over a dozen species have been named since the genus was first described in 1878. Dimetrodon is often mistaken for a dinosaur or as a contemporary of dinosaurs in popular culture, but it became extinct some 40 million years before the first appearance of dinosaurs. Reptile-like in appearance and physiology, Dimetrodon is nevertheless more closely related to mammals than to modern reptiles, though it is not a direct ancestor of mammals.[3] Dimetrodon is assigned to the "non-mammalian synapsids", a group traditionally called "mammal-like reptiles". This groups Dimetrodon together with mammals in a clade (evolutionary group) called Synapsida, while placing dinosaurs, reptiles and birds in a separate clade, Sauropsida. Single openings in the skull behind each eye, known as temporal fenestrae, and other skull features distinguish Dimetrodon and mammals from most of the earliest sauropsids. Dimetrodon was probably one of the apex predators of the Cisuralian ecosystems, feeding on fish and tetrapods, including reptiles and amphibians. Smaller Dimetrodon species may have had different ecological roles. The sail of Dimetrodon may have been used to stabilize its spine or to heat and cool its body as a form of thermoregulation. Some recent studies argue that the sail would have been ineffective at removing heat from the body, and was most likely used in courtship display. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Synapsida Order: Pelycosauria Family: †Sphenacodontidae Genus: †Dimetrodon Species: †limbatus
  11. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Dimetrodon limbatus vertebral sail spine section SITE LOCATION: Wellington Garbar Complex, Waurika, Oklahoma, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Permian (252.2-298.9 million years ago) Data: Dimetrodon (meaning "two measures of teeth") is an extinct genus of synapsids that lived during the Cisuralian (Early) Permian, around 295–272 million years ago (Ma). It is a member of the family Sphenacodontidae. The most prominent feature of Dimetrodon is the large neural spine sail on its back formed by elongated spines extending from the vertebrae. It walked on four legs and had a tall, curved skull with large teeth of different sizes set along the jaws. Most fossils have been found in the southwestern United States, the majority coming from a geological deposit called the Red Beds of Texas and Oklahoma. More recently, fossils have been found in Germany. Over a dozen species have been named since the genus was first described in 1878. Dimetrodon is often mistaken for a dinosaur or as a contemporary of dinosaurs in popular culture, but it became extinct some 40 million years before the first appearance of dinosaurs. Reptile-like in appearance and physiology, Dimetrodon is nevertheless more closely related to mammals than to modern reptiles, though it is not a direct ancestor of mammals.[3] Dimetrodon is assigned to the "non-mammalian synapsids", a group traditionally called "mammal-like reptiles". This groups Dimetrodon together with mammals in a clade (evolutionary group) called Synapsida, while placing dinosaurs, reptiles and birds in a separate clade, Sauropsida. Single openings in the skull behind each eye, known as temporal fenestrae, and other skull features distinguish Dimetrodon and mammals from most of the earliest sauropsids. Dimetrodon was probably one of the apex predators of the Cisuralian ecosystems, feeding on fish and tetrapods, including reptiles and amphibians. Smaller Dimetrodon species may have had different ecological roles. The sail of Dimetrodon may have been used to stabilize its spine or to heat and cool its body as a form of thermoregulation. Some recent studies argue that the sail would have been ineffective at removing heat from the body, and was most likely used in courtship display. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Synapsida Order: Pelycosauria Family: †Sphenacodontidae Genus: †Dimetrodon Species: †limbatus
  12. Hey again, I'm still going through the backlog of undentified stuff from the local cliff site in the south of Manhattan, Kansas so I can sort and pack them away. 1. Here's a rock containing a productid brach (Hystriculina?) and some sort of spine, which I initially assumed to be echinoid but am having trouble matching to anything. It has two exposed parallel rows of projections. The vaguely star shaped cross section suggests there are more around the circumference but I'm not sure. 2. I found two pieces of matrix that were adjacent to each other, both have this long, hollow tube apparently passing all the way through them. On one end of each piece the tube appears to have partially collapsed. There might be some shell pieces inside but I'm not sure. 3. Embedded adjacent to the hollow tube is this object which has an odd surface texture:
  13. I found this odd triangular thing on a shale hash plate along with the typical Permian brachiopods and bryozoans.
  14. Found this amongst some loose pieces from our favourite cliffside in Manhattan, Kansas. Age is probably Lower Permian. There's a faint series of ridges on the concave side. Maybe part of a valve?
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