Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'lyme regis'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 78 results

  1. Lyme Regis Brachiopods

    While looking at one of the shells in my collection that i had originally thought was a bivalve, from the stretch of beach between Lyme Regis and Charmouth, in Dorset (UK), another glance made me realize it is in fact a brachiopod: symmetry in plan view, asymmetrically sized valves in lateral view. So i dug out my British Mesozoic Fossils book and have identified it confidently as Cincta numismalis, which the book lists as occurring within the "Jamesoni Zone" of the Lower Lias at Radstock in Somerset. I am not familiar with the brachiopods of the Lower Lias at Lyme Regis in Dorset, but a quick search online using Fossilworks and plain google failed to show any other occurrences of this species from Lyme Regis. Do any of the Lias collecters here know if this is a common/widespread brachiopod taxon in both Somerset and Dorset?
  2. Hi and Help

    Hi. I’m new to fossil hunting and collecting its a little hobby my 8 year old son enjoys. We came across this on the beach last year and I have no idea how to open it and if it is a ammonite. Any advice would be very much appreciated.
  3. Can anyone identify this object found last year on the shore at Lyme Regis? Thanks and warm regards.
  4. Marine reptile tooth ID Lyme Regis

    Hi all, Bought this tooth online a while back. It was sold to me as "Ichthyosaurus platyodon" (which I understand to mean Temnodontosaurus platyodon) from Lyme Regis. Likely found by the seller themselves, as I know they occasionally collect fossils there. However, for the following reasons, I'm not sure about this attribution: Overall, the tooth doesn't look like your typical ichthyosaur tooth to me: It has more of an oval rather than round cross-section It's labolingually flattened Messial and distal carinae run the full length of the crown and divide the tooth into labial and lingual parts While fine striations can be seen on one side of the tooth (presumably the lingual side), the other side (which would be the labial) seems entirely smooth - though some traces of rare striations can be seen on the photographs The striations are much more similar to those of crocodile or pliosaur teeth than to the plicidentine condition so typical of ichthyosaurs The horizontal banding on the tooth surface is unfamiliar to me with respect to most marine reptile teeth I have seen, but occurs much more frequently on crocodile teeth of various species I also bought another tooth with the same attribution from the seller, more or less around the same time. This one has no striations whatsoever, has a more rounded base, is less flattened and has a more rounded tip. It also has carinae. I therefore reclassified it as a probable Goniopholis sp. crocodile tooth. Now I know that not having the root makes it more difficult to identify this particular specimen, but I was hoping someone on this forum might be able to help me, as currently it goes without label. I've considered crocodile, plesiosaur and even pliosaur, but all of these have some reservations that prevent final classification. For one, none of these groups have teeth that are typically flattened like this, nor do plesiosaurs (sensu lato, thus including pliosaurs) have carinae. Crocodiles, then again, would either have or not have striations all around the tooth. And what to make of the banding: is this just preservational, or does it reflect the internal structure of the tooth - i.e. outcome of the tooth's ontological growth? Tooth measures 18 mm and is missing the tip. Thanks in advance for your help!
  5. Cool fossil found over a century ago redescribed. A "squid-like" creature hunted a fish and both were fossilized. https://scitechdaily.com/200-million-year-old-squid-like-creature-attack-captured-in-ancient-fossil/amp/
  6. I was recently skimming through one of William Buckland's papers (in Geology and mineralogy considered with reference to natural theology). In the paper, he discussed (and illustrated) a squid fossil that had been found by Mary Anning, in the Lias/Jurassic of Lyme Regis in 1828 (see pic below). Would anyone happen to know in what museum this fossil currently is? Taken from Buckland (1837), plate 44'', fig. 1.
  7. Fossil found in UK, Lyme Regis

    Hi, I found what i believe to be a fossilised piece of wood in rock on a beach in Lyme Regis UK about 20 years ago when i was kid. Can anyone shed some light on what it actually is age, correct name etc? Thanks https://photos.app.goo.gl/Prm9ryyr5RJzttRT9
  8. ammonite identification

    Hi, my son and I have a large collection of fossils, some of which we found ourselves on the Jurassic coast of England. As we are now mostly confined to our houses here we were hoping to better document our collection and we were hoping to put the correct names to them all. To start I was hoping that someone could help us out by identifying which ammonites these are. They were all found in Lyme Regis and they are all preserved in iron pyrite. Thanks.
  9. Prepping tips

    Hello everyone, I recently found an ammonite in a nodule I collected at Monmouth Beach a few years back and am thinking of prepping it. It seems to be some kind of deathbed as there are (or were ) 3 ammonites in the rock and it seems to go through the entire nodule. However, I’m stuck with a rotary multitool and have close to 0 prepping experience with it . The only things I know are to turn the speed down when prepping near the fossil and turn it up when removing rock. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
  10. So i managed to acquire this lovely cluster of ammonites, but the largest, and most impressive one, is stuck right in the middle. I’m not sure if I should even attempt to try and get it out, seeing how many ammonites there are around it. Does it seem like a good idea? If so, how should i go about it?
  11. I've got got back from a 6 day trip with fellow forum member @DanJeavs We've both had some brilliant finds, here are some of mine. I've made a video showing some of them. We were lucky our trip timed perfectly with a storm which made conditions pretty good. Hope you enjoy.
  12. They were found in Lyme Regis, a Jurassic area. Could anyone try and identify them? Also, does anyone have any tips on how I could make them look better?
  13. I've spent a fair amount of time now combing the beaches around Lyme Regis and Charmouth in Dorset, England, and thought i would put together a topic that presents all of my marine reptile bone finds (so far) in one place. The fossils here are Early Jurassic in age, approx. 195-190 million years old and come predominantly from the Blue Lias and Charmouth Mudstone formations. I first visited this area in 2013 with the simple goal of finding at least one ichthyosaur vertebra, and now after three subsequent trips in 2014, 2017 and 2019, i've put together a far better assortment of finds than i could have possibly hoped for! I think i have been quite lucky along this coastline, although it has taken many hours to amass this collection. Across all four of my England trips i have spent a total of 18 days looking for bones in the Lyme Regis area, most often on the stretch of beach between Lyme Regis and Charmouth but sometimes at Monmouth Beach as well. This coastline also produces a large quantity and diversity of ammonites, belemnites, crinoids, bivalves, brachiopods, gastropods, and even rare insects. However i've always been most interested in fossil vertebrates, and so the ichthyosaurs and plesiosaurs that are found here have been my primary target for collecting. There are also some impressive articulated fish to be found, but as yet i have had no luck in finding any! Ichthyosaur bones are the most common type of vertebrate fossil in the area, particularly their bi-concave vertebrae. Less commonly you can also find pieces of the jaw, sometimes with teeth. If you are extra lucky though you may also find plesiosaur bones, which for whatever reason are much rarer than those of ichthyosaurs. The best way to find any type of marine reptile bone around Lyme Regis is to closely examine the shingle on the beach, and i've spent seemingly countless hours bent over and slowly walking along the shore looking for them. If you have a bad back it's even more difficult! I've learnt that bones can be found pretty much anywhere on the beach: in the slumping clays, at the top of the beach in the 'high and dry' shingle, along the middle of the beach, at the low tide line, and also underwater amongst the rocky pools and ledges. And just when i start to think that the beach has already been heavily searched and there isn't much left to find, there always seems to be another bone that turns up, often lying in plain sight. The truth is that most people who visit here to collect are not experts and will probably walk past a lot of these bones, as the texture is the most important thing that gives them away and learning to recognise it takes a bit of time. For the sorts of articulated skeletons that sometimes make news headlines and are beautifully intact, searching the shingle is not the way to go, but for a short term visitor like me i think it is the best way of maximising the chances of finding any sort of reptile bone in the shortest amount of time (and something i can take back with me on the plane too!). Without further ado, here are the pics (spread across multiple posts due to file size limits). I've also included as-found pictures for some of these finds to provide a sense of what they look like and how they are found when they are on the beach. The collection so far. Starting first with my favourite Lyme Regis fossil, this is a very nice plesiosaur vertebra that is in great condition! A very rare find! I have been very fortunate to find two plesiosaur vertebrae at Lyme Regis so far, although this one is smaller and more beach-worn than the previous example. Continued below.
  14. Ammonite ID (Lyme Regis)

    Hi everyone, I found this ammonite recently on the beach between Lyme Regis and Charmouth in England and was hoping someone might be able to tell me what species or genus this is? It is from the Charmouth Mudstone Formation, and is about 190 million years old. If additional photos are required i can get more. The diameter of the ammonite is approx. 6 cm. Thank you!
  15. Lyme Ammonite prep thread

    I have decided to do a live prep thread on a Dorset ammonite. The ammonite is roughly a foot across and is embedded in a big bit of matrix. I am exposing the ammonite using very basic tools, so fingers crossed I will post regular updates
  16. Hi everyone! Last week I went camping for 3 days with my cousin and her parents in Lyme Regis (first time on the jurassic coast) and managed to persuade them to join me in a little fossil hunting! On the first day we went to Lyme Regis beach and to cut a long story short, we had no luck. all I found was half of a compressed ammonite in the shale which I then realised I lost when we got back to the campsite! I wasn't bothered though as the shale is so crumbly that it would not have lasted very long anyway. We did however have a really nice time on the beach and saw lots of huge ammonites in the rocks and the ammonite graveyard which was amazing. The next day was allocated to the museum and looking around the fossil shops. Of course I would have loved to have spent the day searching for fossils, but I only tagged along to this holiday! On the last day we went to Charmouth beach in the hope of better luck. My hope was diminished when we saw the hundreds of people all traipsing the beach looking for fossils. A lot of them had hammers and seemed to be hammering indiscriminately at rocks however, and most of those looking on the beach were just walking and staring at their feet. It became obvious quite quickly that this was not an effective method at this site and so I spent that day on my hands and knees. Belemnites were abundant (I really should have stopped picking them up but I couldn't resist) as were tiny ammonite fragments. I only found 3 nicely exposed whole ammonites though and one encased in rock (I might buy some tools to prep it myself - just got my university scholarship money, why spend it on fees!) And then came the excitement: all the previous week I had been preoccupied about this trip to the Jurassic coast and the odd chance of finding an ichthyosaur vertebra, without ever thinking I would. But, a few hours into the trip, what should I see laying on the ground by my feet? An ichthyosaur vertebra!! I just grabbed it and had to sprint back to my cousin down the beach to show her! It more than made up for not finding a larger or more complete ammonite. All in all we had a great time, I can't wait to go back! Some of my nicer finds Some bivalves My only nice whole ammonites Ammonite fragment filled with crystal, there's a lovely ring of golden pyrite showing around the crystal too Crinoid stems The ichthyosaur vertebra!
  17. Lyme Regis fossil ID

    Hi! I found this on my recent trip to Lyme Regis, UK. It would be Jurassic in age. Found on the beach, so I can’t say what layer it came from unfortunately. Its striations are quite ornate and beautiful, and I’d love to know what it is! Bottom view
  18. Hi! I’m currently in Lyme Regis, UK and will be here for a few more (I’ll hopefully be adding to this thread as it goes on!) My parents and I arrived into town yesterday, but before we even could do that, we missed the bus due to a slightly delayed train ride. So we decided to take a short stop in the cafe at the station and was met by this massive beauty. It was great to be greeted by Mary Anning before we even made it to Lyme Regis! Our bus finally came (after a great lunch!) and we were on our merry way! Once we got into town, it was lovely weather - sunny and windy - even though it’s been quite stormy here the past week or so apparently! Makes for good fossil hunting! Unfortunately it was high tide when we arrived so we couldn’t go hunting, but we walked along the Marine Parade along the people beach and ate the best scallops I’ve ever had. In the background, you can see the cliffs of the Jurassic Coast, where Mary Anning found the first Ichthyosaur. The whole town is peppered with fossil shops and paraphernalia, even the light posts are ammonites!
  19. Lyme regis fossil

    Does anyone know what this is, it's from lyme regis and the rock is about 10 cm long.
  20. Ichthyosaur?

    Hello Everyone, This came off the beach at Lyme Regis, heading toward Charmouth. I believe it to be part of an Ichthyosaur front paddle from near the "wrist" end. Confirmation required and any further information would be great. Thank you.
×