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Found 130 results

  1. Hi everyone. I was hoping some of our European members might be able to help me out a little. I am currently at home due to depression, burn-out and severe anxiety attacks all related due to the COVID-19 situation (I work in a essential store and I belong to the risk groups, so after 6 months the stress finally became too much). Long story short, I haven’t left the house since march (except for work), the only 4 times I left was because I had to go to the doctor. But now I am at home and I am currently in therapy with a psychologist and the natural next step is to finally venture outside for the first time since march. So one of the idea’s I had was to go out and pick up fossil hunting again as a way to deal with the anxiety, stress and trauma. I started in august last year and managed to go on 3 hunts since then. 2 with the fossil club (the hunt to Eben-Emael & to Rumst) and 1 hunt one my own in close proximity to home. But since I am new to hunting I don’t know that many good spots to start, I have some idea’s but I have no clue where to start. I already have 1 hunt planned with the club on september 19 to the Devonion of Couvin, but I would like to have been out there again before I go on a group hunt. So I am looking for good fossil locations in Belgium (Normally the Netherlands of Germany would be fine too, but I am not quite mentally ready to leave my country at the moment), I don’t really care about the age of the fossils, I am interested in pretty much everything. But I am looking for places that are easy to access, places where you can hunt without permission. I also asked on the dutch forum, but I know there are a lot of Dutch, Belgian, French & German members here as well who might be able to help. So any locations, suggestions and tips are welcome, if anyone knows some fun places to hunt, I’d love to hear your experiences from there. Some places I had in mind where: The Ardennes: I have heart many great things about people hunt in the Ardennes, but I don’t really know where to start and which are good and easy spots to visit. I was thinking to maybe visit Barvaux, as I have heard it is legendary for it’s brachiopods. But any suggestions are welcome or if any one has some experiences of their own in Barvaux or other places in the Ardennes. Resteigne: This location really sparked my attention as I heard many great things about it. If I read correctly it is a closed quarry that is free to access and which is easy to hunt where some cool Devonian finds can be done. If anyone has been to this quarry I would love to hear your experiences! Antwerp: I know the Antwerp region is world renowned with fossil lovers all over the world because of it’s richness in Miocene & Pliocene shark teeth. And I know that many people hunt there, but I have no idea where these locations are and if they are free to access? Is anyone here on the forum active there? And do you recommend going there as a beginning fossil hunter? And while I don’t know a location to start looking for them, but I am very interested in searching for Carboniferous plant material, preferably in some coal quarry dump site. I know that we had many coal mines in the past, but I don’t know if there are any dumps left that are accessible. I looking for one that are preferable in Limburg or near Liège as that is quite close to where I live. The Schneeberg in Aachen: this is the last place I have in mind and while it isn’t located in Belgium, it is located very close to home. This hill lies on the Dutch/German border the Maastrichtian limestone there is part of the same formations that can be found at Eben-Emael, ENCI in Maastricht and all the other Dutch Limestone quarries that are part of the Maastrichtian type locality. Since those quarries are one of my main interests, but most are closed, the Schneeberg is quite high on the list. So I was wondering whether anyone has hunted there yet and what are your experiences there. I know I ask a lot about a lot of very different localities, but I really need to get back out there to help me put my mind at ease. And I would really appreciate any help and tips and suggestions that I can get. My goal is to trying to visit a different location every week. Maybe @Manticocerasman, @Natalie81, @Indagator, @gigantoraptor & @Joeri_R know some good places to start and have some tips or suggestions? Thank you all in advance! Yours sincerely, Ziggy
  2. I was very happy to see that recent publication that finally described the youngest known alvarezsurid Trierarchuncus prairiensis from the Hell Creek Formation. Material is rare but is most commonly overlooked and described as Croc or unknown theropod so knowing what to look for helps. I'm constantly on the lookout for this material and have been for years and have been fortunate to either find it or be able to acquire it over time. I used publications of other Alvarezsauridae like the Asian Mononykus and Canadian Albertonykus to help in the identification of my specimens. The paper is pay-walled but I included it for reference purposes. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0195667120302469?via%3Dihub Extremely rare associated material found in SD
  3. Fossil of giant 70 million year-old fish found in Argentina (PhysOrg) De Pasqua, J.J., Agnolin, F.L. and Bogan, S., 2020. First record of the ichthyodectiform fish Xiphactinus (Teleostei) from Patagonia, Argentina. Alcheringa: An Australasian Journal of Palaeontology, pp.1-5. (Researchgate PDF) Yours, Paul H.
  4. A. sarcophagus or T. rex?

    Hello all, I collected this tooth last weekend along the Red Deer river in Alberta, and would like to know if it's possible to differentiate it as either A. sarcophagus or T. rex. I'm about 90% sure that it's from a deposit of the Horseshoe Canyon Formation, but the region also has exposures of the Scollard which introduces the possibility that this is from Tyrannosaurus. I had to leave the tooth with a friend until I can apply for a disposition certificate, so I can't get any additional photos, but I made a point to get pics of the major diagnostic features used to ID theropod teeth. Denticle spacing is 0.5mm, or 2 per millimetre: Thanks.
  5. Hoploscaphites nicolletii (Morton 1842)

    From the album Cephalopods Worldwide

    8cm. nicolletii zone Maastrichtian Late Cretaceous. I picked this up for a song recently on our favorite online auction house. I had to finish off the prep and do a small bit of modelling at the venter. The seller had no idea about the location, not even the state, but that really doesn't matter to me. I'm just happy to be able to add another of these gorgeous ammonites to my collection.
  6. Every few years we get rewarded with a new dinosaur described from the Lance/Hell Creek Formations. In this crazy year we finally have one. Finally an Alvarezsauridae has been described from the Hell Creek Formation: Trierarchuncus prairiensis. Sorry its paywalled cannot make comments https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195667120302469 Here is some info on this very different dinosaur, one of my favorites, including some of my material so you can see what the paper is describing. Far better than what you see in the paper
  7. Its always good to see new publications on dinosaur material from Madagascar since we often see it for sale and misidentified. Here we have a publication that looks at the osteology of Rahonavis ostromi, a paravian from the Maastrichtian Maevarano Formation, Mahajanga Basin, northwestern Madagascar. Unfortunately no functional teeth are described just unerupted ones but it gives us a great description of bones and claws. https://palaeo-electronica.org/content/2020/3060-osteology-of-rahonavis
  8. Enchodus libycus (Quass 1902)

    From the album Pisces

    5.5cm. long. Late Cretaceous Maastrichtian From Qued Zem, Khouribga, Morocco
  9. Edmontosaurus Bonebed in Wyoming

    Over twenty years of work on the Hanson Ranch Bonebed in the Lance Formation of eastern Wyoming has yielded over 13,000 individual elements primarily of the hadrosaur Edmontosaurus annectens. Findings are presented in this paper. https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0233182
  10. Need help in identifying problematic fish bone

    Hey everyone Hope you're all doing well! While looking through unprepped/untouched blocks of chalk from last year's fieldwork session in the Late Cretaceous of Møns Klint (Denmark), I found one block that showed a little trace of fish bone. I scraped a bit around it with some dental tools, and managed to reveal the whole fossil. And I'm having quite some trouble identifying it... Could anyone help me? I've included pics and details of the specimen below. Pics: Note especially the 'ridges' in the upper half of the fossil Full details: -Location: Møns Klint, Isle of Møn, Denmark -Stratigraphy: Occidentalis belemnite zone, Hvidskud Member, Møns Klint Formation, White Chalk Group. -Age: Upper part of Lower Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous; ~70 million years old -Measurements: ~5mm largest width; ~4mm height -Possible interpretations so far: partial fin element, partial scale. Most recently, I considered it to be the partial scute of a Dercetidae fish (based on Wallaard et al. 2019 and Friedman 2012)... But I'm really unsure... Taken from Wallaard et al. 2019 Taken from Friedman 2012 I'd be really grateful for any help identifying my specimen
  11. Pseudocorax topic

    This topic is a short continuation of my previous topic on my Squalicorax collection, which can be seen here: This time I have chosen to show my Pseudocorax teeth. As with the Squalicorax teeth, I am open for trades and buying new additions. The oldest examples of Pseudocorax in my collection come from the Lower Campanian. Like the Squalicorax genus, they start off as a genus with very small teeth. Pseudocorax granti (x16) Ozan Formation Lower Campanian Moss Creek, Fannin County, Texas, United States of America See you guy tomorrow, Sander
  12. Squalicorax pristodontus

    From the album Maastrichtian Shark Teeth, Volgograd Oblast, Russia

    Squalicorax pristodontus (Agassiz 1843). Slant length indicated by longest side.
  13. Cretalamna sp.

    From the album Maastrichtian Shark Teeth, Volgograd Oblast, Russia

    Cretalamna sp. (Glikman 1958). Slant length indicated by longest side. Listed as Cretalamna sp. due to C. appendaiculata being a wastebasket taxa. I am unsure if this certain locality has its own designated species.
  14. Cretalamna sp.

    From the album Maastrichtian Shark Teeth, Volgograd Oblast, Russia

    Cretalamna sp. (Glikman 1958). Slant length indicated by longest side. Listed as Cretalamna sp. due to C. appendaiculata being a wastebasket taxa. I am unsure if this certain locality has its own designated species.
  15. Squalicorax pristodontus

    From the album Maastrichtian Shark Teeth, Volgograd Oblast, Russia

    Squalicorax pristodontus (Agassiz 1843). Slant length indicated by longest side.
  16. Cretalamna sp.

    From the album Maastrichtian Shark Teeth, Volgograd Oblast, Russia

    Cretalamna sp. (Glikman 1958). Slant length indicated by longest side. Listed as Cretalamna sp. due to C. appendaiculata being a wastebasket taxa. I am unsure if this certain locality has its own designated species.
  17. A new domaeosaurid, Dineobellator notohesperus, consisting of a partial skeleton from the Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) of New Mexico, the first diagnostic dromaeosaurid to be recovered from the latest Cretaceous of the southern United States. The holotype includes elements of the skull, axial, and appendicular skeleton. From the Ojo Alamo Formation Dineobellator notohesperus Article https://phys.org/news/2020-03-feathered-dinosaur-surviving-raptors.html Smithsonian Mag. Article https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/dineobellator-dinosaur-new-mexico-180974511/ Paper https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-61480-7
  18. Hello forum members! With the new Coronavirus raging across the world, I thought it would be nice to start some kind of advent calendar, using my own Squalicorax collection. Everyday I will post one or multiple Squalicorax teeth from one location. Let's see what ends sooner, my collection or the virus outbreak. I will start with the oldest tooth from the Albian substage and end with the teeth from the uppermost substage; the Maastrichtian. The first one is the oldest and also one of the smallest teeth in my collection. Unfortunately it is so small that the photo's are not as sharp as I would have liked, but I think they are good enough. It is Squalicorax primaevus from the Middle Albian Argiles tégulines of Courcelles, Aube Department, France. See you guys tomorrow, Sander
  19. I found this today in the Ripley Formation (Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) of ne Mississippi. Am I right in thinking it’s a fish vertebral element? Which one? and if so, why the mushroom top? Coin is 19 mm in diameter.
  20. Ripley Formation crab finger(?)

    I found this today in the Ripley Formation (Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) of ne Mississippi. Am I right in thinking it’s a crab finger? Which one? Thanks. coin is 19 mm in diameter.
  21. Hey everyone - hope you're all doing Just thought I'd share with you guys a chart I made, comparing the sizes of various marine reptile species known from the Maastrichtian chalk of Møns Klint (~70 million years old - Hvidskud Member of the Møns Klint Formation). For now, there are only 3 reptile species known from MK. But who knows, that number might increase now that more in-depth collection and research is taking place over there Anyways... onto the size comparison chart - here it is: Details: The Mosasaurus hoffmannii is known from one very well-preserved pterygoid ('palate') tooth crown (belongs to the Danish Museum of Natural History/NHMD, but on loan to the GeoCenter Møns Klint/GCMK). M. hoffmannii is estimated to have reached ~17 metres, though the one in this chart represents a smaller-sized individual (~12m). The M. cf. lemonnieri is known from an excellently preserved tooth crown (belongs to NHMD but on loan to GCMK). Other fragmentary, eroded mosasaur teeth (2 or 3) are known from Møns Klint, and they might belong to either M. lemonnieri or M. hoffmannii The possible Thoracosaurus (crocodylian) is known from a partial mandible, with 2 tooth imprints associated (I'm currently describing that fossil, and soon hope to have the paper sent for publication ) Known remains are shown in white (teeth for the mosasaurs, partial mandible for the crocodile). Note: the reptile outlines are not mine, I modified them from some that were made by DeviantArt users paleosir and PWNZ3R-Dragon. Hope you liked this size comparison chart! -Christian
  22. Hello everyone, Yesterday my girlfriend & I went fossil hunting for birthday. This was the first fossil hunt the two of us did on our self, our previous hunts were all excursions with the Belgian Association for Paleontology. We visited two locations, but locations are part of the Formation of Gulpen, around 68 million years old, dating back to the Maastrichtian (these outcrops are part of the Maastrichtian type location where the first mayor Mosasaurus discovery was done). The first location we visited was a limestone outcrop next to the Albert Channel here in Belgium, only a 20 minute drive away. I discovered this outcrop while looking out the window whenever I drive to Maastricht and yesterday we decided to check it out. It is quite a little outcrop, no more than 70 meters wide, but one of the few places left where you can hunt in Limburg. We hunted here for around one and a half hour and we only searched the fallen and loose bits of limestone that were the results of erosion. We didn't want to start hacking in the rock. We mainly found ancient sea shells of different species and some bryozoa's in this location. And a some pieces of wall where teeming with urchin fragments, but we didn't find any intact one near the surface. But since the urchin graveyard was deeply enbedded in the rock and we didn't want to hack in it, we left it as it was The second location we visited was the "Grote Bos" in Beutenaken in The Netherlands. Here there are holloways in the forest that expose some limestone outcrops. This spot is known for it's belemnite which can be found on the forest paths, because the soft limestone gets eroded but hard belemnites remain, making them very easy to find. We found around 25 belemnites during our 1 hour hunt there as well as a shell imprint and a mystery fossil. Like the previous location, the patch of limestone where these belemnite can be found is also only around 70 meter long, but luckily very rich.
  23. little jaw fragment

    Hi, This is found in 500-1000µm residue of marine sedimentation deposit in the Maastricht area. The deposit is known to occasionally have terrestrial animals present in it. I was wondering of what animal this jaw could be. The size is roughly 900 µm. Kind regards, Arno
  24. Cuttlefish Gladius (?)

    Hello dear users of the Fossil Forum! Please help me to identify the fossil. I'm inclined to think it's a cuttlefish Gladius. Am I right? LOCATION: Russia, Volgograd city area GEOLOGY: Upper Cretaceous Series, Maastrichtian ASSEMBLAGE: the Finds in this place are shark teeth: Squalicorax pristodontus (Agassiz, 1843), Pseudocorax affinis Agassiz, 1843, Palaeohypotodus bronni (Agassiz, 1843), Cretolamna appendiculata (Agassiz, 1843) DISCOVERY: the Gravel bed. Thank you. https://youtu.be/Rt_Cqyl0yA8
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