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Found 164 results

  1. Flag Pond, MD ID Help Needed Part 2

    Also found at Flag Pond this summer. I would love help IDing these as well! Thank you!! #1 (approximately 1 inch) #2 #3 (approx 1/2 inch) #4 (1 inch x 1/2 inch x 1/2 inch)
  2. Flag Pond, MD ID Help Needed Part 1

    I would love help identifying these fossils... all found this summer at Flag Pond Nature Park. Thank you!! #1 (approx. 1 inch) #2 (approx. 1 inch) #3 #4
  3. Fossil / Artifact / ? Help with ID

    Hi guys! I recently found this bone in an Island in the Savannah River, really close to Savannah. There where a lot of pottery shards near by with punctuations and patterns so I'm assuming it's some kind of artifact. It measures 7.10" inches the holes are .0011 inches Note the "cut-like" incisions on the broken part and also the two holes (they connect to the inner part of the bone, so if you pour water on one end it will come out of the holes) at first I though they where foramen (where arteries go into the bones) but they look like drilled and most foramen go diagonally into the bone. See for your self! Any comments are welcome! Thanks!
  4. Mammal Tooth for ID

    I picked up this tooth from Bouldnor Beach on the Isle of Wight in the UK a couple of years ago. It is from the Bouldnor Formation and is earliest Oligocene, about 33 million years old. I'm confident it comes from a mammal of some kind, a rooted canine but that's as far as i've got. To provide some context the site has produced a number of pig-like anthracotheres (the most common mammals), carnivores like Hyaenodon, entelodonts, early primates like Leptadapis, the rhino-like Ronzotherium, deer-like forms and various others. Can any of the mammal people offer their thoughts? @Harry Pristis? Unfortunately the crown is almost completely worn away which i know is a huge detriment to identification. It measures 3.8 cm long, but of course would have been longer with the crown intact.
  5. Not sure what these are

    I went out exploring for possible fossils, and found a lot of what appear to be teeth, vertebrae, and assorted bones. Any further help with identification of these interesting artifacts would be greatly appreciated as I'm new to this fascinating field.
  6. Tooth id

    Hi- I've bought some time ago this mammal tooth (I've attached three pics) from a Chinese seller, who didn't know anything about it (only its Chinese origin)- I think it comes from a carnivorous species, but I'm not expert at all in that field- Maybe anyone can help me to ID the tooth with some more information- Thanks in advance, Fabio
  7. Does anyone have any idea what it is?

    Hi dears colleagues!! I found this jaw fragment with 3 teeth. appear to be incisive and the mandibular fragment includes part of the mandibular symphysis.Does anyone have any idea what it is? Regards
  8. Oligocene mammal tooth, MS

    1/2 cm long mammal tooth found in some material from a creek in East central Mississippi. This creek produces a ton of vertebrate material from sharks, crocs, dugong etc...and some land mammals. Crazy small tooth, any thoughts?
  9. looking a gifted pdf in the mouth

    famo_miohiporgon.pdf fairly new,as these things go. Size:< 1 Mb "Statistical methods will better inform analyses that address the continent-wide issue of distinguishing Mesohippus from Miohippus. These two genera are difficult to distinguish(Stirton, 1940), but are considered distinct based on the presence and condition of the articular facet on the third metatarsal, which articulates with the cuboid; larger hypostyles; a longer face(*); and a deeper facial fossa (Prothero and Shubin, 1989; MacFadden,1998). The paleopopulation of John Day Miohippus is not adequate in addressing this issue because there are only five occurrences of Mesohippus in the entire assemblage. Very few specimens from the Turtle Cove assemblage were identified as Mesohippus, and those that were identified as such were determined to be statistically different from the specimens of Miohippus. " (*): for the ones among us who see the funny side of equid systematics
  10. Savannah River - Small mammal molar

    Hi! I found this small beauty at a beach in Savannah River. Any input is appreciated. Thanks for checking it out!
  11. Mammal Partial Jaw From Gray, TN

    Hello! A friend of mine found this fossil a long time ago on the grounds of Gray Fossil Site (before it was actually established). I believe it belongs to some sort of mammal, but since my main focus is on sharks and dinosaurs, I'm not quite sure. Anyone have an idea of what it may belong to?
  12. Fossils reveal how bizarre mammal beat extinction Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, August 24, 2017 https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/08/170824182708.htm https://phys.org/news/2017-08-fossils-reveal-bizarre-mammal-extinction.html https://phys.org/news/2017-08-caribbean-mammal-extinctions-spurs-renewed.html Yours, Paul H.
  13. Also horse?

    This tooth was found diving off of Venice - we also found this nice, full horse tooth (in the background). The one I'm holding seems so much bigger than a usual horse tooth - could it be from some different mammal?
  14. Fossilized Grazing Mammal Tooth?

    Hello! Interning archaeologist, and we don't have fossils on hand for a comparison collection! I came across this partial tooth in a bag of faunal material. Could anyone help me out? I'm not familiar with fossil fauna, but I know this was some sort of grazer. Width is about half an inch. Much appreciated!
  15. Am I looking at Cow or Bison here?

    Would love to know if I've got cow or Bison artifacts here...
  16. Big bone piece

    Hi all, I found this big piece of bone yesterday on the Zandmotor (Netherlands) (Pleistocene). Most probably from a large mammal. Anyone know what part of the body it might be, and from what animal? Thanks in advance, Max
  17. Tiny little bone

    Hi all, Here is a tiny piece of bone I found on the Zandmotor (Netherlands) (Pleistocene). Do you know what part of the skeleton it might have come from, and from what animal? For now I'm thinking mouse... I can take closeups if needed. Thanks in advance, Max
  18. Big rib (?) piece

    Hi all, Here is a piece of bone, and I think it's part of a big rib (this being the part connecting the rib to the spinal column). It comes from the Zandmotor (NL), which is known for its numerous remains of mammal fossils from the late Pleistocene (40'000 years ago) (mammoth, cave lion, jaguar, dire wolf, woolly rhino, etc). Anyone know from what animal it might have come from? Thanks in advance, Max
  19. Here's a link to an interesting article on these amazing finds: I wonder if @jpc might be able to provide us with any personal insights on these discoveries? I think he is keen on early mammal fossils? https://www.inverse.com/article/35301-gliding-prehistoric-mammals-jurassic-fossil And images of the fossils: This fossil of Maiopatagium furculiferum shows evidence of wing-like membranes that paleontologists suspect helped it glide like modern-day flying squirrels. In this fossilized Vilevolodon diplomylos, the arrows indicate the imprint of the gliding animal's wing-like membrane.
  20. Fossil mammal bone

    Hello everyone. I'm new to this forum. I love collecting fossils and I love paleontology but I'm not great at identification yet. I found this on the banks of the river Vilaine in Brittany in France. I believe it may be from a cloven hooved mammal. Would appreciate any ideas. Thanks, Jo
  21. Partial rib

    From the album @Max-fossils 's Zandmotor Finds

    A small piece of what would have been a rib of a big mammal.
  22. Limb Bone from Cooper River SC

    Hello Forum members, I found this limb bone while diving the Cooper River in SC. I initially thought it likely to be a deer bone based on the overall size and proportions, but I'm unable to match it to any deer bone descriptions I've found. Any ideas?
  23. no sweat?

    reptegume2.43270.66.pdf Once again a note on my posting: yes I deliberately did NOT use a certain word
  24. Hi, I officially finished school forever on Monday so to celebrate my new fangled freedom I decided to spend an afternoon and evening collecting along the Hamstead to Bouldnor coast, so I thought I'd show some of the highlights from the trip. We had very strong winds and some rain here last week so I figured that the beach conditions would be good for collecting, and the Bouldnor Fm. didn't disappoint. I reached the beach at Hamstead point around 1:30pm, and the spring tide was the highest I'd ever seen it. The tide was technically going out but along this coast the tide doesn't actually fall until two hours prior to low tide, which meant that only a small area of beach was exposed and I'd have to wait a few hours until I was able to make a lot of progress along the coast. I decided to sift through the small patches of shingle exposed to kill the time, which can often produce a lot of smaller bone fragments and teeth, especially those of crocodiles. After a few minutes I'd collected a handful of fish vertebrae from Bowfins and Unidentifiable teleosts, turtle limb bones, some sections of crocodilian or mammalian ribs, and a worn centrum from a crocodilian cervical vertebra (most likely Diplocynodon, the genus to which crocodilian material from the Bouldnor Fm. is referred). I moved on to a new patch further along the still very narrow beach and again turned up fish vertebrae, mammalian tooth roots, small fragments of crocodilian scutes, and excitingly a large distal portion of a mammal phalanx (presumably Bothriodon). The tide still hadn't moved so I hedged by bets and moved as far as I possibly could hugging the cliff edge. The base of the cliff at Hamstead Point exposes the boundary between the Bembridge Limestone Fm. and Bembridge Marls Mbr. of the Bouldnor Fm. Just above the junction are the Insect Limestone (world famous for it's insect fossils) and the Oyster Bed (a marine in-raid deposit that can produce fish remains) so I gave these beds a look over but unfortunately nothing was weathering out (Hamstead is an SSSI therefore hammering into the cliff is illegal). Finally the tide started to move out, and when it does it moves out very quick, so there was soon a large area of beach to survey and I could begin making my way down the coast. The finds started coming in thick and fast after that, scores of turtle carapace and plastron fragments (more than 100 in total), crocodilian scutes, mammal teeth, fragments of mammal bones, and much more. The best finds of the trip were by far a large crocodilian cervical vertebra, pre-molars from the anthracothere Bothriodon, and a fragment of crocodilian jaw, again Diplocynodon. But the best by far was a large distal portion of a mammal tibia found lying in the mud a few metres along from the 'Black Band'. As of yet I don't have an ID for the tibia as it is larger than would be expected for Bothriodon. There are numerous other candidates it could be, so I'll research further (if anyone has any suggestions, even if just to an order level, then that would appreciated). It also seems to have provided quite a nice home for a lot marine colonial species and plants which are currently being removed. I wrapped up the trip at 7pm and headed home, with a nice haul of finds. Now I've got a few months off before I start university I should be hunting much more regularly, all over the Island, so hopefully the summer will turn up some good finds! I'll attach images below, including of the tibia fragment. Thanks, Theo The distal portion of mammal tibia, covered in seaweeds etc. A large cervical vertebra from a crocodilian (Diplocynodon s.p) A section of trionychid turtle carapace (Trionyx s.p)
  25. Hello, found these today after spending a few hours at a river in northern Puerto Rico, middle to upper Oligocene Limestone, looking for fossilized shells and cobalt blue glass... found lots of both! Also found these teeth and bones, they were all found relatively close together My guess is modern horse teeth. I have no clue on the bones. Could there be a way to tell how old they are? Pretty sure the teeth can't be too old, since the first cattle and horses were introduced into Puerto Rico from Spain in 1509. Thank you!
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