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Found 51 results

  1. Teeth found on a beach

    Hello, A few years ago me and my daughter found this tooth on the beach in the Netherlands. Since then we started to go regularly to several beaches to find washed off treasures. I though one of them was a horse tooth from the pleistocene...now i am not sure..it's too compact and short..i would love to have your expertise on it
  2. https://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/kangaroo-fossil-hop-australia-marsupial-balbarids-skeleton-research-study-a8764731.html
  3. On Sunday I took a trip to the Natural History Museum in London. I queued up before it opened at 10am and even before then there was a long queue. I have not visited this museum since I was a child and spent an entire day there (10am to 4.30pm - a long time). I was surprised as it is a lot bigger than I remembered and there was so much to see. This place has the most wonderful things and is an incredible place to learn. The museum showcases a Baryonyx, Sophie the Stegosaurus (the world's most complete Stegosaurus) and more! The moving Trex and Deinonychus are also really realistic in the way they move. If you like your dinosaur teeth, the Megalosaurus and Daspletosaurus teeth are out of this world! There is something for everyone in this museum and I would highly recommend that you visit here if you have not already! A lot of the dinosaur specimens are casts taken from other museums but they are still cool to look at. I had taken the photos on my SLR and due to the size of the photos I had to reduce the quality of them to be able to post on the forum which is unfortunate but it's the only way otherwise the photos would take a really long time to load. There are more non-dinosaur related photos that I will be posting at some point later on but may take me some time to pick out. Enjoy the photos from this section of the museum! Blue Zone Dinosaurs (has a mix of some photos of crocs too)
  4. Hallo everybody, I am searching for this osteological atlas: PALES, L. & LAMBERT, C., 1971 - Atlas Ostéologique pour servir à l'identification Des Mammifères du quarternaire - Les Membres Herbivores. Has anybody access to especially this volume? Many thanks, Thomas
  5. https://phys.org/news/2018-09-tiny-fossils-reveal-essential-successful.html https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6176315/Shrinking-helped-early-mammals-survive-200-million-years-ago.html
  6. Mesohippus bairdi formation?

    Hi guys, I recently acquired a piece of fossil Mesohippus teeth that apparently originated from the White River Badlands of South Dakota. The fossil however does not contain any info about what formation it came from. Does anyone have any idea as to what formation it could have come from?
  7. Pleistocene Fosssil Hunt!

    My girlfriend Ashley and I got out to hunt some Pleistocene sites a couple days ago. There are also Eocene sharks teeth mixed in. The rivers are all pretty high, so we went to some bank hunting sites I have found over the years. They definitely did not disappoint! We found a Tapir jaw section, horse tooth, some pretty big alligator teeth, and a variety of other fossils!
  8. Hello, I have been recently shopping around for fossil books that are more image heavy to look around at on my downtime, the few I have so far seem to be generally focused on all fossils and contain hardly any fossil vertebrates from the mesozoic or tertiary periods. Thus I am on the look out for any books that would be good fits, there was one I cannot remember the name for the life of me that I think is a large recent book that I've seen in B&N that goes over all time periods in full color with fossil photos/creature images, if anyone knows maybe which one that could be I was definitely on the lookout for it but any recommendations are awesome.
  9. The dealer has on hand are samples of the teeth of mammals and a pterosaurus teeth. Whether the identification was given correctly. In the future I want to buy these samples. Are they worthy of collection? Thanks.
  10. https://phys.org/news/2018-06-ancient-mammals-bolivia.html https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-06/cwru-usa062718.php
  11. I created this topic for anyone who wants an opinion from others on a potential purchase. Not regarding if the price right, because that’s totally up to you...I’m more concerned about quality, rarity, etc. Post here if you’re on the fence about anything. To kick it off, I’m gonna share what I came across....I’m not sure on the availability on such things like dino eggs meaning, “do I wait or purchase?” I know there are fakes, and I know the quality comes in all ranges...the detail in this particular shell is interesting.... question is, would you hold off and wait for something better, or would you purchase this bit of shell? Not crazy expensive anyway. A magnified Titanosaur argentinosaurus eggshell x4. I sent the seller more specific questions.
  12. Hi, I've just got back from one of my collecting trips to Bouldnor Cliff and picked up an odd mammal tooth crown that I was hoping I may be able to get some help with. The specimen constitutes part of the crown and the roots of an as of yet unidentified tooth (possibly molar?). What struck me about it upon picking it up is that the morphology of the tooth and it's roots do not resemble the usual (and common) dental material from Bothriodont anthracotheres which constitute the vast majority of mammal finds from the upper Hamstead Mbr. I've compared it to the Bothriodon teeth and jaws in my collection and can't find a match with either upper, lower or anterior dentition. The specimen (although partial) is also considerably bigger than the anthracothere teeth, so all in all I feel fairly secure in eliminating them as a possibility. I was wondering if it's possible this may be a piece of entelodont tooth. The Entelodontidae are represented in the upper Hamstead Mbr. by Entelodon magnum, although the material is restricted to isolated teeth and very rare. Unfortunately the occlusal surface is missing which makes it impossible to determine whether the tooth was bunodont or not, however the crown does seem to be quite "bulbous" at it's boundary with the roots, which is a feature I've seen in some entelodont teeth before. That said I don't want to rush to conclusions. If anyone has an experience with entelodont teeth or material and is able to help it would be much appreciated, as this would be a particularly exciting find! Thank you, Theo 1. Lateral view showing contact between crown and roots 2. Lateral view showing the surface where the tooth has been broken revealing inner dentine 3. Occlusal view 4. View of the partial roots on the underside of the specimen 4.
  13. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/23/science/haramiyid-skull-utah.html https://phys.org/news/2018-05-utah-fossil-reveals-global-exodus.html
  14. I've found a couple of listings of archaeocete teeth frags from Harleyville, South Carolina on a fossil seller. I know that Basilosaurus cetoides, Zygorhiza kochii, and Dorudon serratus all exist in this area, with a couple of examples of all three having been found there (now in Charleston Museum collection). However, is there a way to differentiate between them when it comes to teeth, specifically incisors? Some images of the listings are below. First tooth measures 2.6 inches. Second tooth measures 2.2 inches, but is a frag so I imagine that it may be much bigger if restored. Third tooth measures 3.75 inches.
  15. NALMA, SALMA, GABI

    FLYKOwswish this article has some bearing on the following issues: Mammal biochronology,the precise timing and/or speed of the G(reat)A(merican)B(iotic)I(nterchange),it contains some remarks on mammal taxa(however brief), magnetostratigraphic resolution from the Miocene to the Pleistocene, the closing of the Panama isthmus, and the possible diachroneity of mammal taxon appearances. There are NO taxa illustrated,and the authors' (infrequent)use of "heterochroneity " is unfortunate . If you have Woodburne(2012): this might be up your alley I liked it,but I'm weird that way
  16. Hi, It's been a while since I've put anything up on here so it figured it would a good time to share some of my finds from this spring so far. With such a productive winter the start of this spring on the Bouldnor Fm. coast was a bit slow with several trips in which little was found (odd for what is usually a heavily productive site) but as March and April came round the finds started coming in faster and better. Access at Bouldnor is now very dangerous and pretty much impassable due to thick and deep silt and mud which has covered part of the beach (which I found out the hard way trying to get through), along with two recent cliff falls which have brought several oak trees down onto the beach. Hamstead and Cranmore are as good as ever with a lot of the winter's mudflows now eroding away and making the foreshore a lot easier. (Hamstead Ledge on a spring low tide) Mammal finds have been pretty nice so far this spring, as usual all Bothriodon, and alongside them I've also made some nice alligator and turtle finds including two partial Emys in-situ in the Upper Hamstead Mbr. Here are some of the highlights: 1. More pieces of the large Bothriodon mandible I first found in January have turned up scattered over the same area. I now have part of the hinge, two sections with P2 - M3 and a part of the underside of the mandible from further forward. I regularly check the site on my collecting trips so hopefully yet more of the jaw will turn up. (The positions of the fragments may be slightly off in the image below but it gives a general idea) 2. Bothriodon caudal vertebra. This is one of my favourite finds from this spring. I was originally excavating a small micro-vertebrate site when I felt the tool make contact with a large bone, I dug a bit deeper into the clay and found this vertebra with the processes fragmented around it. Luckily with a bit of super glue the processes were easily reunited with the vertebral body, after 33 million years apart. Unfortunately I couldn't locate the other transverse process or neural spine in the matrix nearby so I think they may have been broken off on the Oligocene coastal plain. 3. Bothriodon upper molar in a fragment of maxilla 4. Section of Bothriodon mandible with a nice mental foramen. Unfortunately no in-situ teeth with this one. 5. Section of mammalian limb bone with evidence of rodent gnawing. This was an in-situ find eroding out of the Upper Hamstead Mbr. on the foreshore. Gnaw marks like these are really common on in-situ material especially on limb bones. I don't think the rodents were scavenging the flesh off the bones, more likely they were extracting calcium and phosphate or were simply using it to grind down their continually growing incisors. Either way it shows that for at least a period a lot of these bones were exposed to the elements and accessible to the variety of rodents present on the coastal plain. 6. Nice quality Bothriodon intermedial phalange 7. Large Diplocynodon alligator frontal bone Thanks for reading, and I hope you enjoyed the finds! Theo
  17. An afternoon on the Zandmotor

    Hi all, So on Tuesday afternoon, I was lucky enough to only have a half day of school. Seeing that the weather was nice, and that I had nothing else to do except go home, I decided to take the bus in the other direction, so to Kijkduin, in order to do some fossil hunting! I bought a sandwich and a chocolate bar at the Shell gas station, and set out on the beach. From the beach of Kijkduin I walked south, so towards the Zandmotor, while of course looking for fossils. View of the beach (mind that the sea is on the right side, on the left side it's just a small lagoon), with the haven of Rotterdam in the background. View of the beach with Kijkduin, and then Scheveningen, in the background. (Sorry for the blurriness...)
  18. What to keep

    Out today to the Peace River, Great day, great weather, good friends. Barely time to post a few photos of finds before going to sleep. Many of my co_hunters keep only the best and toss the rest.. I keep everything I find somewhat interesting. So a couple of group photos... In the 1st photo, a collection of Glyto stuff in lower right, a couple of very strange mammal verts that I might put up in the Fossil ID section tomorrow. Upper right is a unique Mammoth tooth fragment. 2nd photo has an Equus Phalanx on the right, a couple of lower hemis (38 and 45 mm) on upper left. A few more photos: Other side of Mammoth fragment: The backside of that round vert on right of photo #1, I have no clue on this one. and finally, a small chunk of coral with crystalized polyps. I have found these before and could track down the name. Some of these finds are relatively rare for me.. I also enjoy finding different stuff. Hope you do also Jack
  19. Friday night Fossils

    I would really appreciate your help in identifying these fossils from eastern Virginia. I'm not familiar with the formations enough to give a name. I think number 6 may be a Pleistocene horse? I'm having trouble with photo sizing. I will try to add another pic of the other side in the comments. Cheers!
  20. Hi, I recently finished processing 4kg of matrix from a horizon in the Upper Hamstead Mbr. of the Bouldnor Fm. from Bouldnor Cliff and thought I'd share the results! The White Band is definitely the most diverse vertebrate fauna I've collected so far in my short time screen washing, with at least 2/3 genera of fish, 2 genera of reptiles, and 2 genera of mammals, it also has some interesting taphonomy. The White Band refers to a thick Polymesoda shell bed in the Upper Hamstead Mbr. and dates to approximately 33 million years bp during the Rupelian. The Upper Hamstead Member is the youngest strata in the entire paleogene sequence of the Hampshire Basin (Late Palaeocene to Early Oligocene). The horizon was deposited in a shallow freshwater lacustrine environment on the low-lying Solent Group coastal plain of the southern Hampshire Basin. By the time the White Band was deposited average annual temperatures in the region were beginning to warm up again after the sudden and rapid cooling that marked the Eocene-Oligocene transition. Global sea levels were also beginning to rise. The Grande Coupure, the large scale turnover of European mammalian faunas had been and gone, and the endemic Eocene groups such as Palaeotheres, Omomyid primates, and anoplotheres had long vanished. The lake/pond system that deposited the White Band was home to aquatic plants such as Stratiotes and was fringed by patches of open woodlands of Sequoia, Pine, and broadleaf. With the post-grande coupure fauna now established the landscape was home to anthracotheres, hornless rhinos, hyaenodonts, bear-dogs, entelodonts, primitive ruminants, choeropotamids, and a myriad of smaller mammals including bats, adapid primates, rodents, insectivores, marsupials, and the otter-like pantolestids. Not to mention the alligators, birds, and freshwater turtles. 1. Worn fragment of Emys carapace 2. Possible fragment of crocodilian osteoderm? 3. Fragment of Bowfin skull bone 4. Isoptychus sp. cheek tooth. Theridomyid rodents like Isoptychus are the most commonly found micro-mammal throughout the entire Solent Group. This molar has been heavily worn which may suggest an older individual. Theridomyids were bipedal and foraged along the ground and in low trees. They also seem to have fed on the seeds of marginal aquatic plants such as Stratiotes, which may be the reason this individual was in the vicinity of the pond/lake. The Theridomyids were one of only a few Eocene mammal groups to survive the Grande Coupure and seemed to have survived fairly unscathed in terms of diversity etc. showing what hardy and adaptable rodents they probably were. 5. Fragment of M3 from a talpid, most likely Myxomygale sp. (just 1.5mm long!). Talpids (or as we call them today, Moles) were newcomers to Europe with the Grande-Coupure, arriving from Asia. Belonging to the tribe Urotrichini (Shrew-Moles) which are only found in North America and Asia today, Myxomygale may have spent most of the day underground in burrows before emerging at night to feed on invertebrates. Modern Shrew-Moles prefer moist habitats such as swampy areas, a habitat which was abundant on the low-lying coastal plain of the Oligocene Isle Of Wight. The taphonomy of the White Band is also interesting. Some specimens i.e. the Emys fragment and osteoderm are highly 'polished' and worn, suggesting transport prior to deposition. Whereas others such as the mammals and most fish material I've recovered are unworn and 'fresh' looking. I'm not sure what conditions could have caused this, and if anyone has any suggestions I'd be really interested. My take is that the mammals and fish were likely living in the immediate area, in and around the lake/pond, whereas the polished material is from animals living some distance away brought to the pond/lake by floods or streams etc. although I'm no trained geologist or palaeontologist. Thanks for reading, Theo
  21. Hi, I thought I'd share some of my best finds from what has been a brilliant start to collecting in 2018! The Isle Of Wight has been hit by heavy storms, with torrential rain and gale force winds, numerous times over the last month or so. This has caused some serious erosion and slipping to the soft clay cliffs and foreshore of the Bouldnor Fm. and the coast has been highly productive. I've made some of the best finds of my fossil hunting "career" (if that's the right term for it), including some very nice large mammal finds that I have dreamed of coming across for a while now. 1. The partial cranium of a mammal. This is without a doubt one of my best finds. I collected it ex-situ from the foreshore and at first thought I was looking at a large piece of fossil wood, which are common in some of the fluvial and freshwater horizons of the Lower Hamstead Member. Luckily I spotted the cancellous bone texture, and quickly realised it was a large piece of mammal skull. The cranium is essentially the left portion of the brain case with the parietal bone, part of the frontal bone, jaw articulation surfaces and saggital crest with scars from the temporalis muscle. The brain case is filled with sediment and Viviparus gastropods, which may be the culprits for the extensive mollusc bore marks on the parietal bone. There is also a Stratiotes seed in one of the gastropod shells indicating the skull was deposited in a shallow (less than 6.5m deep) freshwater pool, probably already broken. Skulls like this are incredibly rare, and I've heard that it looks like it was probably out on the shore for just a couple of hours! As usual with my big or unusual finds I took it straight in to Dinosaur Isle Museum where it's currently on loan for preparation and identification in case it's an important find. I believe it may be something like an Anoplotherium although I'm not sure. 2. Partial Bothriodon mandible. This is a really cool find that I've always wanted to come across! Bothriodon is an abundant part of the Post-Grande Coupure mammal fauna, arriving in Europe and Britain around 33.6 million years ago from Asia. This was facilitated by the Oi-1 glaciation event in Antartica lowering global sea levels and opening up several migration routes from Asia into Europe for a myriad of immigrant taxa. The habitat of the early Oligocene Hampshire Basin was ideal for the proposed lifestyles of anthracotheres (low lying coastal plain with wetlands, lakes, and open woodland), which along with a preservation bias, makes Bothriodon the most common large mammal encountered. I found this jaw in two pieces, 14 days apart and 5m from each other in a mudflat at low tide. The bone is heavily crushed and has P2 - M3 in-situ, although P1 is missing (possibly pre-fossilisation) and I still haven't found the other jaw section with the M2 (fingers crossed it'll turn up one of these days!). I think the jaw washed out of the Upper Hamstead Member during this winter's storms and smashed into several pieces which were subsequently scattered over the immediate area. (P1 to M1 section found 14 days after the M3)
  22. How common were mammals in the cretaceous?
  23. East Coast fossil road trip

    Hello! Later this year I'm planning on moving from Florida back to New England. I was hoping to make the voyage into an interesting road trip... I've heard of several places in the Eastern half of the US where you can dig your own fossils. I know that there are some places in Georgia and the Carolinas that are good to find Megalodon teeth, and some places in the northern US that are good for finding trilobites... I'm up for anything interesting and was looking for suggestions on exact places, tour companies, people, anything that you can offer that might extend my collection on the trip!
  24. A new article from Geology of the Intermountain West: A preliminary report of the fossil mammals from a new microvertebrate locality in the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, Grand County, Utah Article https://www.utahgeology.org/openjournal/index.php/GIW/article/view/25 PDF https://www.utahgeology.org/openjournal/index.php/GIW/article/view/25/47
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