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Found 85 results

  1. Pleistocene mammals from Po Valley

    Bonjour all fellow collectors, my aut gave this bone to me years ago. They are pleistocene / early holocene specimens collected in Po valley in the '70. Do you have any ideas about what they might be? Thanks to all of you.
  2. Beach bone id

    Hey my mom found this limb bone (Likely a humerus or femur, hard to tell since its incomplete) a week ago at the beach and and I'm stumped as to what kind of animal it might be from. Anybody have any ideas?
  3. Hi, as recently I have been going mainly to the Pleistocene location, I have lots of surplus fossils I will gladly trade I'm not looking for anything specific - all offers are welcome. Set A Set B Set C Set D All these fossils come from Góra Kalwaria, Poland.
  4. Strange Grab Bag of Bones

    So over the past couple of posts, i have focused on the individual bones that I have found in the overburden dig site at my plant. One spot in particular has continuously been a gold mine, and have lovingly called my Proboscidean site, after the Proboscidean scapula fragments I first found there. Over the course of 14 months (4 to 6 hours per month) I have dug up more and more fragments of different bones that eventually piece together, but now i have started to find bones of other animals. With all this I have started to wonder if there is some bigger picture I am missing trying to ID each bone separately, or did we just hit a former sinkhole when digging up the overburden, and i am just finding everything that fell/washed in?
  5. Mammals

    I thought about expanding my mammal collection as I didn't have any, and started with some Florida material. Then I desired more exotic mammals. Ultimately I acquired a pretty nice variety. Warning, this is photograph heavy!
  6. Mammal Bones ID Help!

    Hi, I have three bones today that need your help to ID. They were found on Iowa River's alluvial deposits. Thank you!
  7. Hello! Does anyone know of any good references for differentiating between Oreodont and camel dentition, particularly in regards to the little jaw sections that are frequently found in White River deposits? I’ve been unable to find any good literature on the topic and am having some difficulty with differentiating between the two.
  8. South America’s Missing Megafauna

    What Happened to South America’s Missing Mega-Mammals, Trilobites, New York Times. Related papers Marshall, L.G., 1988. Land mammals and the Great American interchange. American Scientist, 76(4), pp.380-388. MacFadden, B.J., Hulbert, R.C. and Baskin, J.A., 2007. Revised age of the late Neogene terror bird (Titanis) in North America during the Great American Interchange. Geology, 35(2), pp.123-126. Dr. Richard C. Hulbert - More papers Bruce J. MacFadden - More papers Baskin, J.A. and Thomas, R.G., 2007. South Texas and the Great American interchange. Gulf Coast Association of Geological Socities. 57, pp. 37-45. Yours, Paul H.
  9. Academic casts-identification help!

    Not sure if this is the right thread, but, here is a bunch of specimens. All are resin or plaster casts of the real deal. some appear to have been painted (poorly) none have been stored correctly and any records of them are long gone. These are part of the collection at the University I work for. I'm not a mammal guy, but I suspect I had better become one quickly. Some have various collection codes on them, but I have been unable to figure out what they mean. These are some of the ones I am clueless on: Jokingly referred to as the "bonenana"...tusk? rib?
  10. Here is a few shots from the famous Norden Bridge in the northwest corner of Brown County Nebraska. This is one of the sites made famous by Morris Skinner and ultimately led to the discovery of Ashfall Fossil Beds. I was in the area, and was able to make another check mark on my list of famous fossil sites to visit. It should be noted that there is NO fossil hunting here. The river itself is federal land, the main quarry, a few km away is private property, and the bluff sites are part of the Nature Conservancy. However, it is a beautiful area to visit, and well worth it if you feel the urge to walk in the footsteps of famous folks. So, to start, here is the bridge itself: And a nice shot from the north banks, showing the strata of the bluff. Near the top is where many many vertebrate fossils have been discovered over the years, from frogs and snakes, up to rihnos and three toed horses and such. Another shot looking downstream on the Niobrarra of a spot known to produce many skulls and mandibles:
  11. Ice Age Animal Tooth?

    Found this in my back yard (Northwest Florida) last week but am stuck on what type animal tooth this could be. Would definitely appreciate any help on identification.
  12. White River Formation Small (toe?) Bones

    Hello, everyone, Lately this summer I’ve been doing a bit of casual fossil collecting (with explicit permission!) on some land that a very close family friend owns in Weld County, Colorado that has a lot of exposure of the White River Formation, and I’ve collected a sizable amount of material including some pretty awesome finds. Being an amateur, I need some help identifying some of the fossils I’ve collected. Since the forum has a photo upload limit per post, I’ll be making a few threads for different finds, I hope that is ok. These are two small bones that look very similar, from Weld County Colorado. To me they look a lot like the toe bones of ruminants like deer, but I’m wondering if anyone has any better or specific guesses. #1: #2: Thanks!
  13. Id mammals bones

    Hi everyone, a friend gave me these bones, two jaws and another piece; he said that he found them in a cave. Can they be dated to the Quaternary? And which animals could these belong to? Thank you
  14. Tooth from Southern Sweden

    Hi, My son has found this tooth when we went swimming in the Baltic Sea (exact location : Löderups Strandbads Camping , Southern Sweden). Appreciate if someone can tell us what this could be as he's very happy to have found it. Cheers!
  15. Tuesday on the White River

    Hello everyone! know I've been slacking on updates on my three week trip to Wyoming with PaleoProspectors, but I promise I will post some more of my finds and do a full recap of last week's adventure as soon as I can. As for tonight, I'll share my experience hunting in the white river formation today, A view of where I began my day hunting. My first find: A section of Paleolagus (rabbit) jaw. Next I found a native american artifact After entering a larger area of exposures I came across this Mesohippus (horse) jaw.
  16. Teeth

    I know these are mammal teeth. I'm pretty convinced that at least the one on the left is a bison but would like to confirm. Would also like a rough estimate of age of possible.
  17. Hi y'all. Inspired by Marco sr's post of his Riker Mounts a few weeks ago, here are a few of mine. These are all 6 inch by 4 inch Rikers. I took the glass off some to avoid reflections. If anyone wants to see better pix of any of these, let me know. Start with a pile of Lance Fm (late Cretaceous of Wyoming) bones and teeth. There are too many fossil in all of this to ID them all, so I will just label a few of my faves. If you want more IDs, just ask. Top left, two Leptoceratops teeth. The brown ones below the right Lepto tooth are baby hadrosaur teeth. Below, Hell Creek from Montana. The thing in the middle is one of the pelvis bones form a champsosaur. To its left, a croc claw, then a coprolite. Below, Cretaceous mammals... sorta. The ones labeld Montana (MT) are from the same site as above. It has late Cretaceous as well as early Paleocene fossils, which except for dinosaurs and mammals are mostly very similar. The three lower jaws are all classically Paleocene. I think the site has reworked Cretaceous stuff, but there is a paper out there claiming that the site has Paleocene mammals in the late Cretaceous. These small teeth really should be photographed under the microscope. And now for some Eocene fun. These are from one of my faviorite sites in the Wasatch Fm of southwestern Wyoming. The square thing in the upper left is a piece of bird eggshell. There are turtle pieces (including the blue one), a croc jaw piece, fish bones, a lizard scute, hackberry seeds, a lizard frontal bone, a Coryphodon ungual, and more in here. These are mosty mammal teeth from an Eocene site west of Casper. (Sorry it is out focus). If you look closely you will see a theropod tooth found in this Eocene site. One could argue that this is proof that dinosaurs survived into the Eocene, but I say poppycock. I have also found Cretceous shark teeth and pieces of baculites here. They are all, in my book, reworked from local Cretaceous beds into the Eocene beds. This last one is all mammals from the same site I mentioned above in the Wasatch Fm of SW Wyoming. Oops, I lied,the top right toe bone is form a turtle. The dark one in the upper left is a nice maxilla with 5 teeth. I have IDed it as Haplomylus. Thanks for looking. Hope you all enjoyed the show.
  18. Good evening everyone, long time I don't show up here (my bad, my thesis is ...well...a thesis). Almost 2 weeks ago I had the pleasure to visit with a friend the "Museo Civico di Scienze Naturali Malmerendi" located in Faenza. Even if it's not the biggest nor the most famous natural history museum of Emilia Romagna I consider it one of the best I've seen so far in Italy. Most of the speciments (Pliocene / Pleistocene) were collected in the area near the city. Mammals are well represented, maybe the most peculiar is what I think is the holotype of the only aardvark specie from our country (if I'm wrong please tell me). Several fishes (in particular a large grouper in matrix) and mollusks are also displayed.
  19. Last week I spent ten days visiting Argentina. Most of that time was spent in Patagonia. Argentina does not allow any private fossil collecting, so this wasn't going to be that kind of trip. On our way back from visiting a penguin colony at Punta Tombo we stopped in Trelew whose number one attraction is the Museo Paleontoligico Egidio Feruglio. It primarily features fossils from Patagonia, dinosaurs and mammals, plus Permian age plants, petrified wood, etc. I got to spend a quick hour there and took some photos. Most of the labels were in Spanish and I didn't have time to take notes. Hope you enjoy what I was able to get:
  20. Is This A Whale Vertebra?

    This piece was found in a pleistocene deposit off the New Jersey coast and was labeled as Whale, hard to find any comparisons so I am unsure this is the case though its likely, any help on this will be appreciated. measures 3 x3 x 2 1/2 in
  21. Mystery Mini Bone Valley Mammal Toe

    Hello everyone, I was looking through a small bag of finds from a year ago from the little digging area outside when I visited the museam in Polk county Florida, and came across this tiny mammal toe that I don't really know what animal it came from, any and all help is appreciated
  22. I found this in the overburden at my work, which usuallly consists of the first 15 ft of dirt, clay, and sand, and below that is the Ocala formation in Alachua county Florida. the vast majority of the bones i find are deep in the redish-brown clay. ( The dark/wet spots are glue)
  23. An Eocene summer

    It was a busy summer, and now it is snowing. I got out a few times this summer and here is my report for y'all's enjoyment. Most of my outings were into Wyoming's early Eocene. Way back in the spring I went to a newly discovered mammal site. I showed one jaw here: Here is a view of the site. This is the early Eocene Wind River Fm in central WY. (Wasathcian in age). Lots of land to look at out here, and I have only prospected a wee bit of it. My pack is down thereon the flats... let's see if we can find any fossils down there. OH, look... a mammal jaw. And can you find an additional bonus tooth in there? Right next to this there were a group of crocodile bones. Again... find the bones. I dug around quite a bit to try to find the source of these bones and got totally skunked. I usually get out into the Eocene beds of southwest WY on Labor day, but this year it happened a month late, so here are some pix from the first weekend of October. It starts getting cold at this time of year. The first photo is me at an abandoned oil well site where the oil folks had scraped up a limestone layer in their bulldozing. The layer has bones in it... mostly turtle pieces and lots of very small (and practically un-prepable) fish bones. If you break rocks long enough you will find good stuff. Below are a the best things I found on this visit. For those interested, these things are prepped with ye ole air abrasive under the microscope. Dolomite at about 20 psi. There is potential for the air abrasive to abrade the bones and I am not sure if these teeth got overly air abraded or are suffering form Eocene erosion. It is very slow prep, so I don't focus too much on this layer. First a little croc dentary. Note that the bone runs off the edge of the rock. I spent a long time looking for the rock that contains the rest of this jaw... again, skunked. But this is a good little find. The empty roundish area to the right of the jaw is the impression of a snail. fresh water snails of the genus Physa are the most common fossils. This next bone is the angular bone of a small croc. The angular is one of the bones in the lower jaw. The limestone layer is in the Wasatch Formation. After busting up enough rocks, I went to one of my favorite sites about a half mile away. Also in the Wasatch Fm. This layer sits just above the same limestone layer that I collected at the oil well site. Here I am digging. Note the weather is getting nicer; I have jettisoned the coat. This site is full of small randomly distributed fossils. Again, mostly turtle pieces, but also some good croc material and occasional mammal teeth and jaws. And here is a distant view of the quarry. The limestone with bones is seen as an small cliff just below my backpack. So, let's look at a few fossils. First an emerging soft shelled turtle piece ( a costal plate). That is a dental pick for scale. The digging here is best done slowly so you don't break the bones. You can see other pieces of bones in here. The first photo in the next post is the same turtle piece fully exposed.
  24. I found this tooth fragment in Kelly park rock springs run in apopka fl anyone know what it is?
  25. Work on Hell Creek Display Begins

    It has taken 10 and a half months but I can finally start putting together our large display of the Hell Creek Fauna. I am really quite excited to start putting it together. We have a pretty good cross section of critters and I think it will be an excellent display to show the diversity of the formation. I also think this will be a great display to use as we explain how different animals share an ecosystem which is a science standard we want to get into more with the 2nd and 3rd grade students. I delayed starting this until we had tracked won three key fossils we were missing, Leptoceratops, Pachycephalosaurus, and Denversaurus. Those three have all gotten crossed off the list in the last month or so with the final domino being Denversaurus. We are still missing a Pectinodon tooth but we can add that down the road. I think now is the time to put it together so we can use this display for our presentation in Paradise which comes shortly after the year anniversary of the Camp Fire which burned the city down. It is a special program at the newly rebuild elementary school I will add some pictures of all the fossils in their individual displays later and once it is all living in one display. I am really proud of this one and I want to give a huge thanks to @Troodon who helped us immensely with this formation. Here is the Denversaurus tooth that I just picked up. A pretty nice tooth and a decent price at that. Today has been a good day for us as this is the one we needed to finish this up right !
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