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Found 7 results

  1. It is becoming to Fossils on Wheels tradition to do a program way ahead of schedule lol I just booked our first marine mammal themed program This is about 5 months before I thought we would be ready but we do not turn down opportunities to do our thing in a classroom. The program is a look at the Miocene featuring marine mammal and shark fossils. We have just enough fossil material to touch on the West and East Coasts of the United States during this time. In fact, we have just enough material to do the program at all but we did this with dinosaurs last year and it worked out just fine. I am really quite excited to talk about marine mammals. This is something I wanted to do last spring but we figured Dinosaurs would be the program that got us attention. Now we can have a little fun and expand on what we can already do quite well. Carter and I can follow the same formula of scientific information enhanced with touch fossils. We have some cool material from STH including some nice touch fossils, a couple of decent Cetacean pieces from the East Coast and shark fossils. We may not have all the fossils that I would want to do this with but I think we have enough to give the kiddos a really great hands-on experience. We can explore some interesting Cetacean adaptations such as echolocation, intelligence, communication, and migration. We can discuss the different feeding styles of whales and why they super-sized themselves. We can balance these adaptations with shark adaptations and fun facts about evolution and theories regarding the extinction of Megalodon. This also gives a chance to really get into the fauna of Sharktooth Hill. I grew up a few hours from STH and it remains the only formation I have collected in personally. We use a number of sharks from STH in the shark program but this is different. We will focus on it while touching on the East Coast of the US. I am pretty excited to get into detail about a really cool part of the natural history of California with our local kiddos. It is going to be fun and I feel pretty confident that we can pull this one off. I have three weeks to work on the presentation plus the kids will get free fossils which helps. I will be nervous like I was when we debuted the dinos but that is not a bad thing. It drove me to make sure we did our absolute best in every presentation. I am excited and will update TFF on the how well this one is received since there are so many STH collectors on the here !!
  2. After spending the summer being more of a collector than an educator, it is time to get into educator mode. We had a good run in the spring and surpassed our own expectations. Carter and I set a big goal for this year. We want to triple the 700+ students we provided fossil education for last year. 2100 students is the goal for this year. It is going to take a lot of work but we are up to the challenge. We are already booking programs in Chico and we are starting to get some interest from schools in Fresno, Sacramento and Redding. We may end up traveling quite a bit more than anticipated this year. All of the programs we have on the schedule right now are from schools we did not get to last year too which seems a good omen. We are going to do 5th and possibly 6th grade programs this year in addition to the 2nd-4th programs. We added an Intro to Fossils program for the 2nd graders and the 5th grade program will feature some Miocene marine mammal material which I am super excited about. I think the bulk of the programs will be Dinosaurs but I am going to really push sharks this year too. We got our new displays done and added some really cool fossils to show the kids. I think the science is stronger this year as I really studied pretty hard. I even did some work on the Facebook page which I totally neglected last year lol I can not say we will give away fossils to all of the kids this year but we did restart the fossil give away program this year too. Right now we have about 200 shark teeth to give away so we know the first few programs will be covered. I should be able to pick up 100 or so more shark teeth in early October. We will do our best to get fossils to as many kids as we can and I hope surpass the 700 mark again this year however we made sure to tell teachers it is a first come first serve part of the program. The best part of the season will be working with my son all the time. He is out of high school and ready to work. The art is coming along and we will be razor sharp with the presentation material. I will not be around on TFF much so no more bad shark identifications lol but I will get updating our progress throughout the year including pictures ( we will have release forms !). I will not be adding more fossils except for give away stuff until December at the earliest so the collector in me is going to be sitting on the sidelines. That is okay because it is time to work We want to once again thank all of our friends on the forum who have contributed to Fossils on Wheels. You have all made this a much better organization and we would not be doing this again without the support we have gotten.
  3. In places where you can find both land mammal bone fragments and marine mammal bone fragments, how can you tell the difference? Would marine mammals have denser bones? Would hollow bones (marrow eaten out or other) be an indicator of land mammals?
  4. The September, Volume 18, Number 4, of the issue of the SAA Archaeological Record has series of review papers about the use of DNA and genetics in studying prehistoric and historic mammals and their past interactions with human beings. The PDF file of this issue is at: http://www.saa.org/Portals/0/SAA/Publications/thesaaarchrec/SAA Record Sept 2018 WEB 9.13.18.pdf http://www.saa.org/AbouttheSociety/Publications/TheSAAArchaeologicalRecord/tabid/64/Default.aspx The papers are: Sea Change? New Directions in Marine Mammal Research by Camilla F. Speller Whale Hunting in the Strait of Gibraltar during the Roman Period? by Darío Bernal-Casasola Ecology, Archaeology, and Historical Accounts Demonstrate the Whaling Practices of the Quileute Tribe in Washington State by Frances C. Robertson and Andrew W. Trites Finding Moby: Identifying Whales in the Archaeological Record by S. Evans and J. Mulville http://orca.cf.ac.uk/115359/1/New Evans and Mulville 2018 SAA.pdf Ancient Pinnipeds: What Paleogenetics Can Tell Us about Past Human-Marine Mammal Interactions by Xénia Keighley, Maiken Hemme Bro-Jørgensen, Peter Jordan, and Morten Tange Olsen Cumulative Human Impacts on Pinnipeds Over the Last 7,500 Years in Southern South America by Jonathan W. Nye, Atilio Francisco J. Zangrando, María Paz Martinoli, Martín M. Vázquez, and Marilyn L. Fogel https://www.researchgate.net/publication/329424997_Cumulative_Human_Impacts_on_Pinnipeds_Over_the_Last_7500_Years_in_Southern_South_America Yours, Paul H.
  5. Hey all - our collections manager and I busted our tails off yesterday trying to get everything ready for the Aurora Fossil Festival on Saturday in Aurora, NC. We're going to have a table for the Mace Brown Museum of Natural History (CCNHM), our museum at College of Charleston. We've got some neat casts on display as well as a couple of cases - one is a case chock full of fossils from Folly Beach, SC, and the other is a case full of Miocene and Pliocene odontocete ear bones from the Lee Creek Mine. If you're attending, be sure to bring marine mammal fossils with you for identification - or just to show off and make us jealous! We'll be in the community center sandwiched between tables for the Smithsonian and the North Carolina Fossil Club. We're looking forward to seeing you there! Lastly, we're also looking for marine mammal fossils from Belgrade Quarry to add to our collections as part of ongoing study of Oligocene marine mammals from the southeastern USA. Teeth, earbones, and skull fragments are not common at Belgrade but several critical specimens have already been donated. With a few more specimens, I will be able to put together a paper on the marine mammal fauna of the Belgrade Formation. Hope to see you there!
  6. A lot of murk and chop on the Potomac today at Westmoreland State Park made finding teeth a challenge, but as usual, there's always something to make the trip worthwhile ... This time it was three pretty nice vertebrae , missing processes, but not as worn out as many I've found. Just wondering if the smallest one is unusual? I can't picture the size of the animal based on the bones but it seems small to me...maybe there's some wisdom on it out there...
  7. Hi! Just thought I'd post three days worth of fossil hunting in Bakersfield, California. Found 250 perfect teeth, including 4 makos over 2", another 500 broken or fragments. There are also two 5 gallons filled with teeth and bone stuck in matrix. Those piece will take me a while longer to clean up, but I'll probably end up posting them too. Anyways, here's some teeth and other assorted fossils. The total haul, a nice stingray barb, and an Isurus planus at 2 1/16".
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