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Found 34 results

  1. Nothosaur tooth

    From the album Triassic vertebrate fossils

    A not so nice but big (3.2 cm long) Nothosaur tooth from a triassic "Bonebed" from a quarry in southern Germany (Baden-Württemberg). During the preparation the tooth broke in several pieces but I managed to glue them back... Some more pictures:
  2. Nothosaur vertebra

    From the album Triassic vertebrate fossils

    A 3.5 cm long Nothosaur vertebra from a triassic "Bonebed" in a quarry in southern Germany (Baden-Württemberg). The prep work was kinda hard, because the stone is extremely hard and the fossil is very fragile. So I think it took about 3 hours. Here is a picture of the unprepped fossil: And finished: As you can see I decided to restore a bit, but nevertheless I am satisfied with the result
  3. Ichthyosaur paddle bone?

    Hello everyone! I recently picked this item up. It was labelled as a ichthyosaur vertebrae, however I just couldn’t shake the feeling it wasn’t. I purchased it and have done some comparing to my other specimens and looking through my textbooks. I’m thinking it could be a paddle digit. The way the lines of the bone sprawl out from the centre rather than the ring formation of some of my vertebrae. Of course I could be completely wrong but there’s always that thrill of the unknown. I’ve compared it to a partial paddle I have and a humerus I also have in some photos to give an idea. Hope someone can help. Kind regards Ryan
  4. Ichtyosaur rib

    From the album Holzmaden

    A kinda interesting combination out of an ammonite, a belemnite and a partial Ichtyosaur rib. It wasn't very difficult to prep but all in all it took about 3 hours. The belemnite is about 10 cm long and the partial rib is about 11 cm long. I found this one last year in the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden. Some more pictures: And the unprepped rib:
  5. Ichthyosaur tooth

    From the album Holzmaden

    A 1.5 cm long Ichthyosaur tooth from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden (Lower Jurassic, Posidonia Shale).
  6. Ichthyosaur ribs

    From the album Holzmaden

    A stone with two ribs, a half vertebra and some rests of some belemnits from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden (Lower Jurassic). All the bones are Ichthyosaur bones. The story of this one is kinda curious because on the stone was firstly only the damaged vertebra visible. But after a hit with my hammer I saw two cross sections, which belong to Ichthyosaur ribs: After some prep: And some pictures of the result: It was very tough to prep it because the stone is extremely hard and the separation layer between the fossil and stone was bad. I think all in all it took about 5 hours to finish this one. I am not completely satisfied with the result but its okay.
  7. Nothosaur vertebra

    From the album Triassic vertebrate fossils

    A Nothosaur vertebra from a quarry in southern Germany (Baden-Württemberg). Its from a thin layer where you can find many bones and teeth from various animals (a triassic Bonebed). I found this one in 2018 but I finished prepping in this month. Its my biggest Nothosaur vertebra until now with a length of a little bit more than 6 cm. Overall the prep work took about 4 hours. A picture of the unprepped fossil: And prepped:
  8. Nothosaur vertebra

    From the album Triassic vertebrate fossils

    A 5 cm long Nothosaur vertebra from a triassic "Bonebed" in a quarry in southern Germany (Baden-Württemberg). This one is kinda fragile so the prep work was hard. I often give up and tried it another time again. Here is an older state: And another picture of the current state:
  9. Nothosaur tooth

    From the album Triassic vertebrate fossils

    A 1 cm long Nothosaur tooth from a quarry in southern Germany (Baden-Württemberg). Nothosaur teeth are the second commonest kind of teeth after shark teeth in the triassic layer I hunt. Another picture:
  10. Cretaceous turtle, Oued Zem

    Hey everyone I ordered this piece last night, it will probably arrive in the course of this week. According to the listing it is a turtle bone from the cretaceous phosphate layers of Oued Zem in Morocco, but the exact species wasn't identified. But unfortunatly I am not very familiar with Cretaceous sea turles from Morocco, I just found it a nice piece to add to my Oued Zem display. So does anyone know which turtle species can be found in the cretaceous phosphate layers of Oued Zem? The only species that came out while googling was Lytoloma elegans, but I am sure some of you might know other species that lived in Oued Zem during the Cretaceous? Thanks in advance!
  11. Recently you could find "many" bones and teeth in a "Bonebed" in a quarry near Buttenheim in Germany. Too bad I was a bit too late to search in this Bonebed. As I was there it was still possible to find something but the layer was buried under about 1 meter dirt. So I couldn't really find something there. All bones and teeth come from the Toarcian. This thread of @Kasia inspired me to buy some teeth and bones from there too. So thank you for the inspiration Here are my acquirements: I bought three Steneosaurus (crocodile) teeth: The first one is about 1. 3 cm long: Detailed: The next one is a big one with a length of 2 cm. This one was found in Altdorf: The last one is damaged and small (0.8 cm long) Beside of these Croc teeth I also bought some Ichthyosaur material from there: A 1.1 cm long tooth which could be quite nice if someone didn't glued it that bad... I am not sure what I will do with this one because there seems to be another tooth in the matrix and I will maybe try to break it and glue it a bit better. Too bad the teeth are extremely fragile so I am not sure what I will do... And another small Ichthyosaur tooth with a length of 0.6 cm: And last but not least three small Ichthyosaur vertebrae: All three are a bit bigger than 2 cm. All in all I have to say that I am quite satisfied with my purchase expecially because I didn't had to pay too much money for them. Thanks for viewing
  12. New Zealand marine reptile vertebra

    I've got this very worn vertebral centrum from the marine Conway Formation near Oaro (Late Cretaceous; about 79-73 Ma) on the south island of New Zealand. The only two logical candidates are plesiosaur or mosasaur from this formation, both of which are known here. There are characteristics of both groups seen on this bone which is tripping me up a bit. One end face seems a bit concave and the other more convex which is a mosasaur feature, but then there also looks to be two distinct holes on the ventral side (see photo three) which could be the paired foramina that are characteristic of plesiosaur vertebrae. So i am left scratching my head! What do others think? Front face Dorsal view Ventral view (note what look like paired foramina) Lateral view
  13. Last Friday and last Sunday I visited the quarry Mistelgau in Bavaria. Its since 2005 abandoned and a very beautiful geotop. But you can still find fossils there! It's possible to find various Jurassic fossils like ammonites, gastropodes, marine reptile bones .... I was mainly interested in finding some Ichthyosaur bones and all in all I was quite successful. Here is a picture of the quarry: Belemnits can be found everywhere ... I found 6 Ichthyosaur vertebrae and 5 paddle bones. The vertebrae: The two associated vertebrae are my favourite ones. Unprepped: And prepped: The preparation wasn't too easy. It took 3 or 4 hours. Some more detailed pictures of vertebrae: Unprepped: Prepped:
  14. Some bones from Mistelgau

    Recently I visited a clay pit near Mistelgau in Bavaria. It's a kinda famous quarry because of the "belemnite battle field". Huge plates with hundreds/thousands belemnites come from there. But you can also findother fossils like ammonites and also bones. I already was there a few times and I mainly found ammonites and of course belemnites. But this time I also found some bones in the area of the Belemnite battle field. They were just laying therebut it was kinda difficult to find them because they are round, Belemnites are round etc. so I more or less crawled through the quarry So here are two picture of the quarry: The typical ground there: Lots of belemnites, some ammonites and very rare other fossils like bones. I found two types of bones. Firstly Ichthyosaur paddle bones: Here is a picture of all the paddle bones I found (unprepped): Mostly they were kinda small but I was able to find a nice one with a length of 3 cm: And here is another detailed picture of a small one (1cm)
  15. Unknown Reptile Bone

    Hello everyone. First ever post here so apologies if I get anything wrong. I was recently gifted a fossilised reptile bone from Farringdon, Oxfordshire in the UK, (unknown date of discovery unfortunately but I was told it’s from the Jurassic period) The fossil in question messaures 15cm in length, height 4.5cm(tallest part) and 3.5cm( shortest part), width 1cm (thickest) and 0.5cm (thinnest). As you can see the bone has elements of curvature to it. I have a feeling the piece is pretty sea worn and understand it may never get an ID but thought it might be worth a shot to see what others think it could be! Any ideas anyone?
  16. A little Ichthyosaur vertebra

    Today I finished prepping a little Ichthyosaur caudal vertebra from Holzmaden. Too bad I didn't took any pictures of the unprepped vert but I did a lot I prepped it with my air pen and with my new sandblasting machine. I am very happy about this tool Here it is: It's very small with a length of 1.2 cm. Hope you like it
  17. Ichthyosaur vertebra

    From the album Holzmaden

    A 1.2 cm long Ichthyosaur caudal vertebra from the quarry Kromer in Holzmaden (Posidionia shale, Lower Jurassic). Some more pictures: The prep took about 1 hour and I used an air pen and a sandblasting machine.
  18. Hello everyone, had a super quick trip to the cretaceous creeks of new jersey and found this particularly interesting large bone fragment, likely it is a chunk of miscellaneous bone material but it reminds me alot of a scute like ankylosaurus or some sort of other bone scute especially the edge, or from maybe something like a large turtle but I am entirely not sure if it's dinosaur, marine reptile, etc or if there is anyway to tell, looks super suspicious to me anyways so if anyone has any ideas I'd definitely love to hear them. (If more pictures are needed I will definitely be able to get some more angles if necessary)
  19. Found on the shoreline in shanklin on the Isle of Wight, UK. Local fossil hunter told me that whilst dinosaur bones are rare, marine reptiles are more common because of the shoreline geology. Found in lower greensand (Cretaceous) deposits. Photograph is difficult to capture the unusual shape - I really have very little clue as to what it could be, I'd be amazed if any detailed identification was possible but would be nice to find out what it vaguely is, even if it's absolutely nothing! The shape definitely strikes me as some kind of joint that has maybe been fractured a long time ago and weathered? Any input would be greatly appreciated!
  20. http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-york-north-yorkshire-43652968 http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5578443/Eight-tiny-fossilised-embryos-inside-180-million-year-old-ichthyosaur.html
  21. Welcome to my first Fossil ID Post! I bought this fossil at a Market in Johannesburg. The seller claims it to be a juvenile Mosasaur. The sediment layer seems to be derived from seabed but I am no expert. Seller claims to have retrieved the specimen from Morocco. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Reptilia Order: Squamata Clade: Platynota
  22. Jurassic Bone Block ID? (Yorkshire, UK)

    Hi all, I recently found this massive bowling ball sized rock at Saltwick Bay near Whitby on the Yorkshire coast (Northern England). It is lower to middle Jurassic, i think about 180-170 million years old (possibly the Whitby Mudstone Formation). As you can see it it's full of various bones, which occur on almost all sides of the rock so they are probably running right through it. Prep for this one is going to be a nightmare i can tell and i don't have the right tools, but for now i really just want to try and figure out what i've got. I think it's fair to assume the bones are associated. The options for this bit of coast are fish (Gyrosteus), ichthyosaur, marine crocodile, plesiosaur or dinosaur. I was hoping based on the cross sectional shapes of some of the bones, and the texture of the bone itself, someone would be able to narrow down what it might be. Fish or reptile would be the first thing to determine. My obvious first assumption was marine reptile, but some of the fish on the Yorkshire coast like Gyrosteus are also huge (5m long) and i'm not very familiar with their bone structure. In this picture, i thought the rectangular bone towards the bottom might be a vertebra in cross-section. If so, from what? Could it be the edge of an ichthyosaur vertebra before it dips down in the centre? This bone is the biggest in the block, about 8 cm long and 3 cm thick. Continued in the next post!
  23. Nothosaurus mirabilis, France, Muschelkalk fm

    From the album Dinosaurs and Reptiles

    Middle Triassic, Length 0.6 cm.
  24. Fossil Wood? Or something else?

    Hi all, I recently found this on a trip to the Jurassic Coast at Dorset and have been intrigued by this find, i'm not an expert on fossil identification and was wondering if there was anything significant about this fossil. it strikes me as being either fossilised wood or an infilled burrow of some kind, however the shine, shape and downward strikes are leaving me somewhat puzzled. i would be grateful for all your potential ideas as to what this could be.
  25. Kem Kem bone id

    Hi guys can anyone help with these 6 bones from Kem Kem? @LordTrilobite @Troodon They dont look theropod to me so I'm wondering turtle? Maybe A and D are phalanges? B, C and F humerus (humeruses/humerii, plural? hehe) thanks John
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