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Found 76 results

  1. Marine reptile tooth ID Lyme Regis

    Hi all, Bought this tooth online a while back. It was sold to me as "Ichthyosaurus platyodon" (which I understand to mean Temnodontosaurus platyodon) from Lyme Regis. Likely found by the seller themselves, as I know they occasionally collect fossils there. However, for the following reasons, I'm not sure about this attribution: Overall, the tooth doesn't look like your typical ichthyosaur tooth to me: It has more of an oval rather than round cross-section It's labolingually flattened Messial and distal carinae run the full length of the crown and divide the tooth into labial and lingual parts While fine striations can be seen on one side of the tooth (presumably the lingual side), the other side (which would be the labial) seems entirely smooth - though some traces of rare striations can be seen on the photographs The striations are much more similar to those of crocodile or pliosaur teeth than to the plicidentine condition so typical of ichthyosaurs The horizontal banding on the tooth surface is unfamiliar to me with respect to most marine reptile teeth I have seen, but occurs much more frequently on crocodile teeth of various species I also bought another tooth with the same attribution from the seller, more or less around the same time. This one has no striations whatsoever, has a more rounded base, is less flattened and has a more rounded tip. It also has carinae. I therefore reclassified it as a probable Goniopholis sp. crocodile tooth. Now I know that not having the root makes it more difficult to identify this particular specimen, but I was hoping someone on this forum might be able to help me, as currently it goes without label. I've considered crocodile, plesiosaur and even pliosaur, but all of these have some reservations that prevent final classification. For one, none of these groups have teeth that are typically flattened like this, nor do plesiosaurs (sensu lato, thus including pliosaurs) have carinae. Crocodiles, then again, would either have or not have striations all around the tooth. And what to make of the banding: is this just preservational, or does it reflect the internal structure of the tooth - i.e. outcome of the tooth's ontological growth? Tooth measures 18 mm and is missing the tip. Thanks in advance for your help!
  2. Dinosaur teeth from Liaoning, China?

    The teeth below are said to be dinosaur teeth from Liaoning, China. Are they dinosaur teeth or teeth of marine reptiles?
  3. First egg from Antarctica

    https://phys.org/news/2020-06-egg-antarctica-big-extinct-sea.html I thought this was pretty cool (no pun intended).
  4. UK Marine Reptile Teeth

    Hello all, I've had two teeth in my collection for many years now. I've recently moved and lost the supplied ID labels that came with them. I've taken this as a nice opportunity to see what others may think they are. I believe if memory serves me right the large tooth (Tooth A in photos) was labeled as a Simolestes. Then the smaller tooth tip (Tooth B in photos) labeled as Liopleurodon. I know both were found in the Wicklesham pit in Faringdon, Oxfordshire, UK. Upon some research, I found an article from 2014 with a Dakosaurus tooth discovered to be the largest in the UK at the time. This tooth bears some resemblance to tooth A but I'm unsure. I've attached a link to the article below. Tooth B has been worn down but still presents with grooves in the enamel. I have also labeled each photo to allow for easier identification when talking about it (Hope this helps!). Im excited to hear what others think. Thanks for reading Link to articles on Dakosaurus- http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/science-tooth-fossil-dakosaurus-maximus-01954.html
  5. Hello again everyone! This is a specimen that was advertised as a Hydrosaurus Lingyuanensis. The specimen appears to have had some serious restorative attempts done at from the centre to the lower body. I wanted to ask if you could please let me know what you think regarding the authenticity of the specimen - particularly the areas that haven't been modified. The first image acts as a refernece, showing the approximate area where the photos have been taken. Thank you in advance. Frontal image + reference Back of specimen Image 1 - tip of skull 2 - Neck vertebrae 3 - upper body, just below neck 4 - painted on (?) front foot 5- back foot, not looking great either 6 - tail vertebrae 7 - not even sure what I'm looking at Real ribs on the left with some terribly drawn ribs?
  6. a pistosauroid

    A NEW SPECIMEN OF THE TRIASSIC PISTOSAUROID YUNGUISAURUS, WITH IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ORIGIN OF PLESIOSAURIA (REPTILIA, SAUROPTERYGIA) by TAMAKI SATO, LI-JUN ZHAO, XIAO-CHUN WU and CHUN LI [Palaeontology, Vol. 57, Part 1, 2014, pp. 55–76] satochunlipalassauropyunguistriasspistosaurpala.12048.pdf " Revised diagnosis. Differing from known pistosauroids in the combination of the following characters: single interpterygoid vacuity with a narrow anterior extension, anterior extension of parasphenoid, at least six premaxillary teeth,elongate snout with slender teeth, pineal foramen reachingfrontal/parietal suture, nasal present, longitudinal ridge on temporal bar, sharp parietal crest, lack of squamosal bulbat posterior end of skull table, long mandibular symphysis,prominent coronoid process, constriction of snout and mandible (in adult individuals), about 50 cervical vertebrae with short neural arch and accessory articulation (zygosphene/zygantrum), rod-shaped chevrons not united medially, sickle-shaped clavicle, small scapula withoutventral plate, dorsal process of scapula slightly widen,absence of interglenoidal thickening of coracoids, semicircular pubis, long shaft of ilium, slender humerus and epipodials, hourglass-shaped ulna, at least 11 carpals and 8 tarsals (in adult individuals), hyperphalangy in manus"
  7. Sauropterygia bones

    From the album Triassic vertebrate fossils

    A 13 cm long stone with three nothosaur vertebrae and another unidentified small bone piece from a triassic "Bonebed" in a quarry in southern Germany (Baden-Württemberg). The verts are very small, especially the one beside the bone fragment. The bigger ones are about 2 cm long. Detailed pictures:
  8. Nothosaur tooth

    From the album Triassic vertebrate fossils

    A nicely preserved 3 cm long Nothosaur tooth from a triassic "Bonebed" from a quarry in southern Germany (Baden-Württemberg).
  9. Sauropterygia bones

    From the album Triassic vertebrate fossils

    A 20 cm long stone with a couple of bones from a triassic "Bonebed" in a quarry in southern Germany (Baden-Württemberg). On the plate are two vertebrae, one rib and two unidentified bones. The quality of the bones is partly not good (especially the vert in the middle is bad preserved). The prep was not too difficult but it took quite a long time to finish it. Some more pictures:
  10. Hi, In 2013 I bought a keichosaurus fossil from online , and since then I haven't thought much of it, after me and my mum and dad moved to a new apartment the fossil got somewhat forgotten, but today I tried inspecting it. I read some of the treads here but even with this I can't decide if mine is a real or a fake one. From what I have gathered there aren't many outright fakes, but more so real ones that are enhanced. I will be glad to hear your opinion on the pictures (sorry for the poor quality but I had to use my phone). Any response will be very much appreciated. Best regards to everybody.
  11. Cretaceous Organic Marine Deposit

    I have a large assortment of various Marine and Flying Reptile fossils. Here is a sample.. 1) pair of undetermined fossil heads 2)
  12. Hi all, I was recently offered this tooth from late Cretaceous of Orensburg, Russia. Most likely Gaisky City District. I can't figure out if it's a Polycotylid plesiosaur or Pterosaur tooth. The overall shape is closer to pterosaur than plesiosaur. However, I am not aware of pterosaur having wrinkling like that, nor do I know of pterosaur teeth being found there. What are your thoughts on this? Thank you.
  13. Nothosaur vertebra

    From the album Triassic vertebrate fossils

    A 3.5 cm long Nothosaur vertebra from a triassic "Bonebed" in a quarry in southern Germany (Baden-Württemberg). Two more pictures:
  14. Ichthyosaur paddle bones

    From the album Holzmaden

    These are four Ichthyosaur paddle bones from the lower Jurassic from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden. The prep was very difficult because the stone was kinda hard. I gave it up several times but now its finally finished. I hitted the bones a few times so its not the nicest piece. Maybe I will try to prep it from the other side one day. Some more pictures:
  15. Ichthyosaur rib part

    From the album Holzmaden

    A small Ichthyosaur rib part from the lower Jurassic of the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden.
  16. Ichthyosaur tooth

    From the album Holzmaden

    Here is a 1.5 cm long Ichthyosaur tooth with a nice structure from the lower Jurassic from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden (Germany). Another picture:
  17. Ichthyosaur paddle bones

    From the album Holzmaden

    These are four Ichthyosaur paddle bones and another Ichthyosaur bone from the lower Jurassic from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden. The Ichthyosaur paddle bones are about 5 cm big so not too small. There are also a lot of belemnites on the plate. Because of them the prep work was kinda time intensive. It took about six hours to reveal everything. Here are some more pictures:
  18. Ichthyosaur tooth

    From the album Holzmaden

    Here is a little (about 1 cm long) Ichthyosaur tooth from the lower Jurassic from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden (Germany).
  19. The seller claims is a plesiosaurus vertebrae 20cm that has no extra pieces on or glues , i was wondering if somebody can say the opposite. thanks in advance
  20. Here is a piece with four paddle bones and another bone from a rather big Ichthyosaur. I found it about 2 weeks ago in the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden (Lower Jurassic) and finished the prep today. Overall I spent about 6 hours to prep this one. Especially because of the belemnites. The paddle bones are about 5 cm long. Sadly I forgot to take a picture of the unprepped stone but you could only see the cross sections of the bones on both. But here are some pictures of the progress: Finished: And some detailed pictures: I used air scribes and air abrasion to prep it.
  21. Steneosaur tooth

    From the album Holzmaden

    A 1 cm long Steneosaurus tooth (crocodile) from the lower Jurassic from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden (Germany). Another picture:
  22. Probably Plesiosaur bones

    From the album Holzmaden

    This seems to be a kinda rare find because maybe these are plesiosaur bones. Plesiosaur is the rarest marine reptile in the area of Holzmaden so I am pretty happy with this find On the plate are two ribs, a phalange and an interclavicle. But I am far away from being with the ID although I already showed it too some local experts. Its from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden (Lower Jurassic, Posidonia Shale). Unprepped: Some more pictures of the prepped specimen:
  23. Last Sunday I was able to find a piece with some jaw bones and teeth of an Ichthyosaur in the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden. I was very pleased with that find because the situation in the quarry is not the best. There is only a kinda small pile of stones where you are allowed to search (and where you can find marine reptile fossils, in the other regions of the quarry its very unlikely to find a bone or a teeth of a marine reptile). And this pile consists at the moment only out of very small rocks because they were laying until the beginning of the year there. So many collectors already searched there. And it's very likely that they don't get new material in this summer... Here is a bad picture of the quarry: And here are some pictures of the jaw bone with the teeth: The prep work took about 5 hours. It's a pity that I lost that missing part in the quarry. I searched about 1 hour for it but couldn't find it. But at that time I didn't know that its a jaw bone (no teeth were visible). Now about 65 small Ichthyosaur teeth are visible. They are from a very small Ichthyosaur, maybe even from a juvenile!
  24. Crocodile cervical rib

    From the album Holzmaden

    This is a 5.2 cm long cervical rib of a crocodile. Its from the Posidonia Shale (Lower Jurassic) from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden. Another picture:
  25. Ichthyosaur vertebra

    From the album Holzmaden

    A 3.5 cm long Ichthyosaur vertebra from the Posidonia shale from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden. Another picture:
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