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Found 450 results

  1. Topanga State Beach, California

    I'm brand new here. My kids and I were at Topanga State Beach today and though we've been thousands of times before, this was the first time we found fossils! We found lots of rocks packed with small shell fossils, but then this one was much larger. The photos are all from the same one rock, different angles and sides. Any idea what it is (or maybe it's just a large shell)? Any idea how old it is?
  2. BEACH FIND

    Went for a walk down the shoreline in Huntington Beach, California the day after a storm and found this. I have a video of it on my instagram, is there a way to get it here so that it shall pass admin gates? Sorry for the crappy close up of the conical shaped shell at the bottom.
  3. Sponge?

    Zoom for better detail.
  4. unknown jaw pieces

    In a late cretaceous marine formation I found two little pieces of jaw. I would like help in id if possible. One is maybe 2.5 cm in length and the other 3 cm, both have the ragged texture of almost everything from this site. I wonder (hope) if the upper is croc, and if the lower is a small mosasaur. It does not match the typical fish jaws that I find because of the sharp curve to the teeth. Help and ideas will be appreciated.
  5. Unknow bone

    Hi all I found this little specimen a while back back and have a tenatave Id for the specimen I am still open to other options as to what the fossil may be. This specimen was found in the marine enviroment of the toolebuc formation in central Queensland.This formation is cretaceous aged about 100 millions years. In this enviroment I have found - ichthyosaur, pliosaur, turtle, shark, fish, bird, pterosaur so the posibilities are there. I have held back on the tenatave ID so as not to push in any direction and to allow alternate sugestions. Thanks in advance for any input. Mike
  6. Marine crocodile vertebrae: what's the difference?

    Hi all, I recently took some more interest in crocodile vertebrae, an area that I haven't really touched on before. Now I already knew that the vertebrae of marine crocodiles differ from those of more terrestrial species as Thalattosuchia have platycoelous vertebral centrums, whereas other crocodylomorphs have procoelous vertebrae. Within Thalattosuchia, however, the two major branches superficially (at least) seem to have rather similar "waisted" vertebrae. So, what I was wondering about was how one can tell Metriorhynchid vertebrae apart from Teleosaurid ones. Anyone here that could help me with that? Anyway, thanks in advance for your help!
  7. mancos shale

    Mancos shale outside of Grand Junction Colorado 2 inches in length
  8. Nautiloid

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Eutrephoceras sp. Cretaceous C and D Canal Delaware City, Delaware Mt Laurel Fm.
  9. An Earbone.. I think

    I was fortunate to go hunting with friends ( including a couple of TFF members ) today. Most of my friends know me as a fossil enthusiast, interested in mammal ear-bones. I am extremely good at identifying horse ear-bones. My TFF friends brought me this fossil find, which I did identify as an ear-bone , and they donated it to me, If I would attempt to get a specific ID on TFF. Because I am thinking marine, let me ask Bobby @Boesse to look at it. It "looks" broken, but I am not sure. The only thing I am sure of i that this find is a fossil. All comments appreciated.
  10. Here are some finds from a late August to early September long loop road trip, fossil hunting through Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Indiana and Kentucky. I'll appreciate detailed specimen identification help. First photo shows brachiopods & a trilobite from the Devonian Silica Shale Formation near Sylvania, northwestern Ohio.
  11. Over the weekend, I decided to take a trip to the Santa Monica mountains for a hike and a fossil hunt. There was information about the site in "NEW UPPER PALEOCENE SPECIES OF THE BIVALVE PLICATULA FROM SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA" by Richard L. Squires and Louella R. Saul, which contains Late Paleocene marine life. This is probably a good opportunity to warn fellow hunters that it is not a smart idea to go quickly up a canyon in near 100 degree heat. Under the early afternoon sun I walked too quickly and made the mistake of not pacing out the hike! Despite plenty of water intake I was still lightheaded by the time I found the site, and a little dizzy. I rested in the shade immediately and ate the lunch I had packed while cooling off. Then I got to work examining the scree for a while before heading down the canyon to my sweet AC. The spot: Unfortunately, not much caught my eye this time. Marine fossils I took home: While splitting, these concretions popped out. Anybody know what they are? I've been enjoying rearranging them. Lower left may contain a fossil, I'll send closer pictures if anybody wants to see. As well as this, which I believe is one of the above split open. It has a ringed, deviled egg quality. I found a similar piece in the Badlands of SD and was surprised to come across this here. If there's a technical name I'd really like to know it! Do pack plenty of water if you hunt around here for the next month or so, you'll be doing yourself a big favor. And go slow!
  12. So Many Minis!

    From the album Aurora/Lee Creek Mine Micro Matrix

    This assemblage came from one cup (about 340 ml) of micro matrix from Aurora Fossil Museum. Oddly, they are generally much larger than most of what I found in the rest of the matrix. They are all from either the Pliocene or Pleistocene. See album description.
  13. Mystery bone from the Boulonnais

    Hi all, Back once more with a find from the Boulonnais. This time found between Boulogne-sur-Mer and Wimereux. The geology there is Kimmeridgian marine deposit, and the fossil presented here derives from a block of yellow sandstone with marine inclusions. It was embedded in an enclosure of soft, porous sand, which I hadn't quite expected and is the reason it's currently in the state it is in. I managed to find a rock with a pycnodont fish tooth and some similarly coloured (i.e. white) bone fragments in the area, in comparable yet harder sandstone. So my first impression was some kind of fish bone. However, I'm having a hard time figuring out what kind of fish bone, seeing as my piece is flat on one side and appears to have a bit of a twist (or may be a depression where another bone would have gone) on another. As such, the flat side made me think of a jaw bone, of a marine reptile in particular. Yet, the bone seems to extend away from it's flat side, which wouldn't quite fit what one would expect of a jaw bone. My third guess, based on the slight depression on one side of the bone and the rounded end at one of the short sides (which kind of reminds me of the epiphysis of a long bone), was some kind of long bone - lower arm or lower leg, where you'll typically find two bones lying closely together - but I'm not sure of this either. Moreover, this would be the feature of a terrestrial animal, not a marine one - with the exception of crocodiles (which lower extremity bones, however, are not closely spaced together, so wouldn't match my hypothesis). I realise the bone is fragmentary and not even in the best of states. But I hope enough has been preserved to determine something of it's origin, if even just in terms of marine vs. terrestrial, reptile vs. fish or mammal, etc. Dimensions: 86.5mm/3.40" long, 42.6mm/1.67" wide, and 23.5mm/0.92" tall Thanks in advance for your help! Don't hesitate to ask for additional details.
  14. Very odd little fossil found today in the Mississippian Warsaw Formation of St Louis County, Missouri, USA. All insights appreciated.
  15. A broken Miocene Tooth2

    Not a lot of information here. The area we are hunting generally has small shark teeth, Megalodons, a very few Great Whites, plus marine mammal teeth, verts, etc. There is an occasional land mammal identification, such as Gomphothere. I generally think middle to late Miocene. This is not my find. I am trying to Identify for a friend. My immediate reaction was not whale because I can not detect any horizontal banding and I should see it... Also I have not seen enamel caps on whale like this. I thought Dolphin, but even now, I do not find that convincing. All comments appreciated.
  16. Help IDing (coral?)

    Hello, This was found in Ariyalur, India, the deposits are Cretaceous age marine sedimentary deposits. The specimen itself appears to be some sort of branching coral, but I am unable to find any suitable references of collected specimens that look like this. It was found alongside ammonites, sea urchin fossils etc. I am a little puzzled by how "neat" it looks. I'm not looking for a specific identification necessarily, but a general pointer in the right direction would be appreciated. The piece is roughly 6 inches long/ 3-4 inches deep and has lots of interlocking "coral branches".
  17. Dealing with marine algae

    Hello everyone, I found the below ichthyosaur vertebra on the beach at Wimereux two weeks ago. It had obviously been lying there for some time, as it was covered in green algae and barnacles. Based on the advise of various friends and the fact this rock seems to hard and massive to work through using just my Dremel, I'll be leaving the fossil in its matrix. However, I do want to clean it up from the algae and barnacles. As such, I used a 1:2 dilution of 14° household cleaning vinegar and a couple of sturdy brushes to remove most of the algae (dipping the brushes in the solution between brushings) and soaked it in soapy hot water. Areas with tougher algae were treated using the undiluted vinegar. Today removed the remaining barnacles using wooden toothpicks, following it with another soak in hot soapy water and another rinse. Although I think this got rid of all the barnacles, and the piece is no longer entirely coated in green algae, there are still various green spots on the rock (and a slight green sheen on the vertebra itself) that haven't come out with the treatment. (Also the "dead fish smell" still lingers) This makes me wonder about the following things: 1. Can the algae regrow, given enough light and moisture in the air? 2. Has anyone ever experienced algae spreading in their collection after failing to remove all traces of algae (I mean, fungi will spread between books and, as I understand, algae can transmit their spores by air)? 3. Is there a way I can get rid of the remaining algae on the rock? E.g. exposure to sun/UV light? 4. Is there a way something can be done about the slight lingering smell, or is this just something that needs to dissipate over time? Now I read some of you prefer using diluted bleach to remove algae growth from fossils (as mentioned in the post below), but I'm not sure I feel comfortable playing around with such aggressive agents yet...
  18. No clue what these are

  19. No clue what these are

    Let me know if you know what these are.
  20. Yunnan Fossil Bone

    This fossil was from Yunnan, China. Of Triassic formation, same layer as Keichousaurus. It’s 55cm in length. Any idea what it is?
  21. It's definitely a..thing?

    Look guys I have a... well its definitely a something? Is it a plant, the top of a crinoid, a broken tooth, a really tiny volcano??? No idea. And as a bonus I have no idea where it came from either. It was given to me ages when I was a kid. So if you've got any ideas on what the heck it might be, I'd love to hear 'em! Thanks!
  22. Hey everyone. I thought I'd share some of the things I found on my last fossil hunt. So.. Many.. Fossils! One might even say that there were a plethora of fossils. If I could, I would've taken them all with me, but sadly my backpack can only carry so many rocks. I was literally examining each rock I had, trying to decide which to carry back and which to leave behind and how many I could fit in my pants pockets before they started to fall down. Eventually I decided to just stop looking for fossils and hike back to the jeep. This lasted all of 3 seconds before I found another a beautiful byrozoan and was trying to figure out how to fit it in my pack. The byrozoan and the sponge below are my favorites since i don't see many of them and the brachipod in the matrix just looks cool. lol Its fascinating to look at these fossils and think about how Arizona used to be completely underwater long, long ago.
  23. What do you think?

    Hey guys, I'm back with another ID question. The fossil I'm trying to identify is in the 1st picture. I think that what I have is a fossilized brachiopod WITHOUT the shell. What do you guys think? It's the same general shape, but the color and textures of this fossil look different than others I've found in the area. The symmetrical textured part in between the two humps, I've never seen before. Pictures 1,2, and 5 show the fossil in question and pictures 3 and 4 show examples of other brachiopods that I've found. The last picture is an example of a brachiopod that was broken in half, exposing the animal inside. (when I uploaded the post the pictures got out of order) So anyways, that's what I think I have but I'd really appreciate your thoughts on this. Ya'll have a lot more experience with these thing than I do so I welcome your opinions. Thanks!
  24. Section of Cretaceous marine bone

    I found this section of Creataceous marine bone from NW Queensland , Im thinking its part of a small turtle bone. Does anyone have any ideas on what it maybe from?
  25. Plant ID, total newbie

    Hi, just looking to find out what I found today. The biggest I've found at Seaton Sluice beach in coniferous area, Northumberland in UK
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