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Found 437 results

  1. Very odd little fossil found today in the Mississippian Warsaw Formation of St Louis County, Missouri, USA. All insights appreciated.
  2. A broken Miocene Tooth2

    Not a lot of information here. The area we are hunting generally has small shark teeth, Megalodons, a very few Great Whites, plus marine mammal teeth, verts, etc. There is an occasional land mammal identification, such as Gomphothere. I generally think middle to late Miocene. This is not my find. I am trying to Identify for a friend. My immediate reaction was not whale because I can not detect any horizontal banding and I should see it... Also I have not seen enamel caps on whale like this. I thought Dolphin, but even now, I do not find that convincing. All comments appreciated.
  3. Help IDing (coral?)

    Hello, This was found in Ariyalur, India, the deposits are Cretaceous age marine sedimentary deposits. The specimen itself appears to be some sort of branching coral, but I am unable to find any suitable references of collected specimens that look like this. It was found alongside ammonites, sea urchin fossils etc. I am a little puzzled by how "neat" it looks. I'm not looking for a specific identification necessarily, but a general pointer in the right direction would be appreciated. The piece is roughly 6 inches long/ 3-4 inches deep and has lots of interlocking "coral branches".
  4. Dealing with marine algae

    Hello everyone, I found the below ichthyosaur vertebra on the beach at Wimereux two weeks ago. It had obviously been lying there for some time, as it was covered in green algae and barnacles. Based on the advise of various friends and the fact this rock seems to hard and massive to work through using just my Dremel, I'll be leaving the fossil in its matrix. However, I do want to clean it up from the algae and barnacles. As such, I used a 1:2 dilution of 14° household cleaning vinegar and a couple of sturdy brushes to remove most of the algae (dipping the brushes in the solution between brushings) and soaked it in soapy hot water. Areas with tougher algae were treated using the undiluted vinegar. Today removed the remaining barnacles using wooden toothpicks, following it with another soak in hot soapy water and another rinse. Although I think this got rid of all the barnacles, and the piece is no longer entirely coated in green algae, there are still various green spots on the rock (and a slight green sheen on the vertebra itself) that haven't come out with the treatment. (Also the "dead fish smell" still lingers) This makes me wonder about the following things: 1. Can the algae regrow, given enough light and moisture in the air? 2. Has anyone ever experienced algae spreading in their collection after failing to remove all traces of algae (I mean, fungi will spread between books and, as I understand, algae can transmit their spores by air)? 3. Is there a way I can get rid of the remaining algae on the rock? E.g. exposure to sun/UV light? 4. Is there a way something can be done about the slight lingering smell, or is this just something that needs to dissipate over time? Now I read some of you prefer using diluted bleach to remove algae growth from fossils (as mentioned in the post below), but I'm not sure I feel comfortable playing around with such aggressive agents yet...
  5. No clue what these are

  6. No clue what these are

    Let me know if you know what these are.
  7. Yunnan Fossil Bone

    This fossil was from Yunnan, China. Of Triassic formation, same layer as Keichousaurus. It’s 55cm in length. Any idea what it is?
  8. It's definitely a..thing?

    Look guys I have a... well its definitely a something? Is it a plant, the top of a crinoid, a broken tooth, a really tiny volcano??? No idea. And as a bonus I have no idea where it came from either. It was given to me ages when I was a kid. So if you've got any ideas on what the heck it might be, I'd love to hear 'em! Thanks!
  9. Hey everyone. I thought I'd share some of the things I found on my last fossil hunt. So.. Many.. Fossils! One might even say that there were a plethora of fossils. If I could, I would've taken them all with me, but sadly my backpack can only carry so many rocks. I was literally examining each rock I had, trying to decide which to carry back and which to leave behind and how many I could fit in my pants pockets before they started to fall down. Eventually I decided to just stop looking for fossils and hike back to the jeep. This lasted all of 3 seconds before I found another a beautiful byrozoan and was trying to figure out how to fit it in my pack. The byrozoan and the sponge below are my favorites since i don't see many of them and the brachipod in the matrix just looks cool. lol Its fascinating to look at these fossils and think about how Arizona used to be completely underwater long, long ago.
  10. What do you think?

    Hey guys, I'm back with another ID question. The fossil I'm trying to identify is in the 1st picture. I think that what I have is a fossilized brachiopod WITHOUT the shell. What do you guys think? It's the same general shape, but the color and textures of this fossil look different than others I've found in the area. The symmetrical textured part in between the two humps, I've never seen before. Pictures 1,2, and 5 show the fossil in question and pictures 3 and 4 show examples of other brachiopods that I've found. The last picture is an example of a brachiopod that was broken in half, exposing the animal inside. (when I uploaded the post the pictures got out of order) So anyways, that's what I think I have but I'd really appreciate your thoughts on this. Ya'll have a lot more experience with these thing than I do so I welcome your opinions. Thanks!
  11. Section of Cretaceous marine bone

    I found this section of Creataceous marine bone from NW Queensland , Im thinking its part of a small turtle bone. Does anyone have any ideas on what it maybe from?
  12. Plant ID, total newbie

    Hi, just looking to find out what I found today. The biggest I've found at Seaton Sluice beach in coniferous area, Northumberland in UK
  13. Cyclocrinites in Arizona?

    I'm in Northern Arizona in an area full of crinoid, bryozoan, and brachiopod fossils. Recently I found what I believe might be a cyclocrinite. It's round, about the size of my thumb, and pitted like a golf ball. Its been suggested that this might be a calyx from a crinoid but since the hexagons on my fossil extend inward and not outward, I have my doubts. It looks like this thing was trapped in a pocket when it was fossilized. You can even see some space between the fossil and the material around it. The last picture shows the section of the stack that broke off, revealing the fossil inside. I thought about cracking it open but I'm concerned about damaging the fossil. Any thoughts on what this might be? If its not a cyclocrinite my other theory is that some poor caveman lost his golf ball in a water hazard on a 500 million years ago. I'm new to the forum and you guys are the experts here so any help would be appreciated!
  14. Bone from New Jersey beach

    I found this (probably modern) bone on a New Jersey beach a few years ago, and it has been puzzling me ever since. The large flat area, and the edges that look like they interlock closely with other bones, makes me think this is a skull element, presumably from a marine mammal. But it doesn't seem to closely match any of the dolphin or whale skull bones that I can make out in photos I found online. Any help is appreciated.
  15. oddball Pennsylvanian ?alga

    Anyone seen this species or similar? Found in Pennsylvanian spoil piles of central Illinois (near Peoria). Is it part of some kind of alga? Not my find and not my specimen, so these photos are basically what we have to go on. More broadly, can anyone here recommend a Treatise-style taxonomic book detailing known algal heads / macroalgae in the fossil record? Thanks.
  16. Weird Neogene/Pleistocene Tooth

    I found this the other day in a bag of Aurora micro matrix. It's only about 3 mm long. Could be Miocene, Pliocene or Pleistocene as all three run through the mine and the matrix is thoroughly sifted together during mining operations. There appears to be a root and possibly two tips broken off?
  17. Sometimes, it's not a rock !!!

    Whenever I am hunting , I tend to consider everything a fossil. So when you are with me, I am constantly coming over asking "Is this a rock?" or Do you think it is coprolite? Is that enamel? and I know a LOT about Florida fossil shapes. So right after, a companion said that this was a rock, I picked up something that might be a rock concretion. However, once again I am skeptical and will ask @Boesse to help me differentiate marine mammal from rock. So other TFF members can chime in with opinions. Rock or fossil? It is a littleover 2 inches in length
  18. While spending the holiday weekend at Lake Almanor, I decided to take an afternoon trip out to Taylorsville, California to look for some fossils. According to a geologic map I found, this site is located within the Jurassic hardgrave sandstone. I’m not very familiar with Jurassic marine invertebrates so I’m not able to identify any of my finds. But I figured it might be interesting to some to show some fossils from an out of the way site in Northern California.
  19. Mollusk ID Requested

    All, I found this fossil in a shale deposit of Pennsylvanian age in Northeastern Oklahoma. The shale is probably Chanute formation and contains other marine fossils. I would appreciate any help with ID. Best wishes.
  20. More Devonian marines.

    So I went on another scouting mission today. New spot is looking like it will be amazing when I spend a day there. Only spent about an hour looking for fossils and found some interesting stuff. Also my first trilobite Cephalon!!! So stoked!! It has a chip on the front and I think the other eye could be in the matrix. The matrix is a lot harder than what I have found fossils in before, also seems like the fossils are much better preserved.
  21. Hi all My kids and I found this tooth in one of the feeder creeks of the NSR in May. Someone said that it could be a worn Protosphyraena tooth. The leading edge is sharp; whereas, the trailing edge is round. It's also mostly compressed and broad-based. Any information or thoughts is much appreciated! Thanks!
  22. Fossil ID please

    Found in abandoned Longhorn limestone quarry in NE San Antonio, TX. For scale: my thumbnail is 18mm Please help identify. Many thanks!
  23. Marine fossil ID please

    Any ideas on these two fossils? Found at a local pit just outside of my town, marine deposits near Karoo basin.
  24. Folks, I found this fossil mollusk from a shale deposit in Northeastern Oklahoma. The shale is of Pennsylvanian age (probably Chanute formation), and contains other marine fossils. I would appreciate any help with ID. Best wishes.
  25. unknown shell

    I find the ribbing of this shell peculiar. Do you recognize this taxon? Oxfordian of Poland. Associated finds include: sponges, brachiopods & bivalves.
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