Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'marine'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Hey Everyone :P
  • fossil maniac's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 271 results

  1. Marine Fossil ID?

    I found this is Western Washington state in an Oligocene Era sediment. I was thinking baculite but I have no idea. Someone please help me out. I split open a huge piece of mudstone and it popped out negative and positive (so the rock on the left is the imprint and the right is the positive). A piece broke off so I had to glue it back together
  2. No idea about what this is.

    Recently re discovered a bunch of these things that we got from the Canary Islands. They were all washed up on the beaches and they do not look stricktly geological to me and looks kind of like some kind of modern calcified organism or trace of one. I stumbled upon a book at some point, I believe it was called Darwin's Fossils that said these were some kind of remains of algae that have fossilized, but when I looked that up there was no evidence I could find supporting this claim, maybe someone else knows what these things could be? Any new insight is appreciated, Thank you.
  3. Requesting assistance identifying the dark slug-looking forms, these look like they were once soft-bodied so I'm pretty lost. I haven't the foggiest idea what these are and my fossil reference books don't have anything that looks like this in the photos or illustrations from what I can see. This was a creek find in southeast Louisiana. Your time and expertise are very much appreciated by this fossil newbie, thanks.
  4. Couple of finds

    I think I may have found my first Devonian bryozoan. (From Sylvania, Ohio.) And I also am not sure if these are shell or plant impressions. The rock that I think has the bryozoan has many nifty whatnots to explore, but that pattern immediately caught my eye. I'm not sure if the fan shape on the second rock is plant or shell. And there's a small bit to the left of it that appears to be shell that I haven't started to ID yet. (Pics in second post) Thanks for any help.
  5. This comes from Centerville Beach, Humboldt County California. I've found alot bivalves and snails in the cliffs where I found this. Another Formation 5 miles away has had reports of turtles, shark and marine mammal teeth and even agatized whale bones. I'm sorry about the quality of the pictures. I do not currently have a very nice camera. Its sticks to my tongue and has a rough porous surface. The divet on the right side of the bone in the first picture is a place where is has apparently broken.
  6. Clearing some brush under an old red oak and found these
  7. Small Jaw

    I found this little specimen that I assume is a jaw section a while back when sieving through some matrix. The material that it came from is marine from the toolebuc formation in central Queensland Australia this is cretaceous albian in age. Any input I would be grateful for. The specimen is 4mm on the long so quite small Regards Mike
  8. Near the Dutch town of Winterswijk is an Eldorado for fossil lovers. A student has now analyzed pieces from museums and (primarily) private collections for his master's thesis. He found an amazing amount of almost completely preserved skeletons, between 242 and 247 million years old. The good condition is presumably due to particularly favorable development conditions. LINK
  9. Hi there, I'm wondering if anyone can help me identify what this belongs too? Location is morocco which we all know can be risky, however it doesn't look like a typical fake to me. Not my expertise but would like to know an ID for it? Please see bottom image! Typical Fake Is it real? What does it belong too? Thanks in advance
  10. Keichousaurus

    Hello I am letting go my Keichousaurus fossil for trade, size it's at 9 inch and looking for dinosaur fossils or nice Megalodon tooth for it.
  11. I found this last year on the Yorkshire Coast. It was just sitting ontop of a large chunk of shale that had come down. Just prepped it today and it's come out pretty well. It's very fragile though. Will be from a ichthyosaur, plesiosaur or large fish!
  12. I found this unusual finger-like fossil on a Tampa Bay beach in Florida. It's about 3 inches long by 1 1/4 inch wide. It has an oval indention with swirls on the end, that looks like an external bivalve mold. The finger-like piece has corallite markings on it. Is this a mold of a shell or a fossilized coral finger? Thanks!
  13. Mysterious sea tooth

    I have found this thing in a campanian marine phosphate deposit. It came along with fish and shark teeth. It looks like some kind of tooth, but I have no idea. The brown area is translucent and looks like enamel. Although the grey is thicker and sharp. Any experts on cretaceous fish would be welcome Ps. This is definately not just a rock, I am fairly familiar with this deposit and can judge a rock from a fossil. Could anybody I'd this please?
  14. I feel clammy

    Misaki_cretacjapasiaet_misakcommensmollusal-2014-Palaeontology.pdf COMMENSAL ANOMIID BIVALVES ON LATE CRETACEOUS HETEROMORPH AMMONITES FROM SOUTH-WEST JAPAN AKIHIRO MISAKI, HARUYOSHi MAEDA, TARO KUMAGAE and MASAHIRO ICHIDA Palaeontology, Vol. 57, Part 1, 2014, pp. 77–95 "Lagerstatt" is not among the keywords,but some ammonites are reasonably well preserved A long while back I said here that syn-vivo encrustation might be more common in the fossil record than usually assumed . @Heteromorph
  15. Pennsylvanian unknowns

    Pittsburgh county Oklahoma USA, Pennsylvanian period , found in association with shark denticles and small ammonites. About 8mm across.Asking for a friend.
  16. Happy holidays everyone. I would greatly appreciate help identifying the following specimen. It was collected in the Santa Susana Mountains of Simi Valley, Ventura County, California. It came from the Saugus or Pico Formation. Saugus is late Pleistocene to late Pliocene while Pico is middle Pleistocene to Pliocene. My uncertainty regarding the exact formation arises from the fact that (1) it was float material already weathered out of the formation it came from and (2) based on limited research and knowledge, I believe there has been a lack of consenus regarding differentiation of the two formations (see recent work by Richard Squires et al. in Valencia and R. Squires in Newhall). I assume it is marine since all of Pico is marine and Saugus is non-marine to marine. At first I thought it was a shark tooth when I picked it up but I threw that thought out the window when I realized it had three serrated edges. Measures 22 millimeters long and 6.5 millimeters wide. It is 4 millimeters tall on one end and 9.5 millimeters tall on he end that has the needle structure. There are three to four 'bumps' on both long sides on the end with the needle. The bumps look evenly spaced. I can and will do my best to provide additional info if needed.
  17. Unknown marine fossils

    During a trip I purchased a container of small marine fossils. I could identify almost all of them except for a few. Age, location, etc. unknown. Does anyone know what they could be? P.S. feel free to ask for more pictures.
  18. Fossil? Funny rock?

    Hi everyone! What about this one? It was found in a well-known fossil site, an old cretaceous sea, in central Spain (Maranchón, Guadalajara, Spain). I would say the texture suggests a living creature of some kind. Too bad it would be a small fragment.
  19. Virginia Miocene 10/21/18

    After an extremely successful and enjoyable first trip to the Miocene of Virginia, my dad and I decided to give it another go when we saw that another guided trip was being held in late October. Our first trip resulted in my two biggest teeth ever, massive mako and huge hastalis. This time around, there weren't as many people on the trip, which is typically a good sign because it means less competition. The conditions, however, were brutal. It was very cold, and on top of that there were extremely fast gusting winds that made the river look more like an angry sea. Luckily, the tide was remarkably low while we were there, so there was a TON of ground to cover. I ventured south in search of some large shark teeth, and was successful to an extent. I talked with a woman who showed me a decent meg she had just found, but that was just about the best find I saw all day. Although I didn't come away with anything spectacular this time, I still got a respectable haul consisting of lots of hemis, some decent makos, a couple massive Chesapectan, and more of the typical Miocene finds. A big thank you to @SailingAlongToo again, for his instrumental role in organizing and supervising the trip. Already can't wait to head out again. I know there's a meg out there somewhere with my name on it. I'll find it one of these days. Thanks for reading! ~David
  20. I spent a few hours fossil hunting on two separate trips on Forest Service land in Montana. The first trip was this past spring looking for Late Oligocene - Early Micoene flora about 90 minutes outside of Missoula. The second trip was during at stint over the summer at a fire lookout tower in the Flathead where I spent just a few hours one morning looking at Devonian and Mississippian marine layers. Besides the obvious, the trips were quite different. The spring trip was a drive to a road cut on a Forest Service road while the summer trip was a seven mile hike in. Additionally the medium is completely different; flakey, brittle shale compared with big, blocky limestone. You can keep non-vertebrate fossils as long as you don't plan to sell them. Prior to heading to an area, I look through publicly available research, lectures, field trips, etc. to find possible localities. I only found limited information on possible identification of the Late Oligocene - Early Micoene flora and most of if was unpublished graduate work from a nearby site with only some overlap on species. Please feel free to correct any id's or throw new ones out! I believe these are cercocarpus, a mahogany.
  21. Hey folks, I was wondering how you guys would approach something like this (or if samples like this are even worth your time!) There's so much going on I'm a little confused as to how and where to start. would you remove the gastropods individually, break the rock apart, sacrifice the broken ones in the search for more complete specimens, leave it as is? I went through the pinned messages and learned a lot, but was curious if anyone's come across similar types of rock and could give some insight. My goal is to hopefully find and extract some of the more complete specimens, and maybe discover some trilobites along the way! The plan was to chisel out as many surface fossils as possible, then strike the rocks with a sledge hammer to break up the pieces, give them a good hard scrubbing, then use my steel picks and chisels to poke around further however the resources provided to me by @FossilDAWG and @Kane (thanks again by the way!) described a number of rare, some now lost, trilobite specices from the same formation found in similar contexts alongside Ceratopea Canadensis, so maybe a lighter touch might be in order? I'm still a little scarred from the time I put a pickaxe right through an almost complete piece of 1st century terra sigillata once upon a dig </3 I'll definitely be looking into air pens/compressors (looking at you ME-9100) as well, but on my pay that's one of those 'somewhere down the line' sorts of purchases. If those are definitely the way to go however, I can always shelve these for that later day...they've been sitting around in a forest for this long, another few months wont hurt! I did notice while cleaning the sample below that there appeared to be two separate matrices, a softer one which I assume was the sand/silt and then the hard dark rock underneath. I've got a much bigger slab with a lot more going on, but I grabbed this little one to practice and learn on! My first target is that crystallized one which is slightly exposed on the top (bottom center of the picture on the right) followed by whatever that is beside it and that mussel looking fellow.
  22. Ottawa Marine Fossils

    Hey folks! It took some time but I've finally gotten around to uploading some pictures from my recent fossil ""hunt"! The quotations are there because the directions I left for myself from a prior trip included such extremely helpful tips as "left at the spooky demon tree". Turns out when you're a chicken a lot of trees look like spooky demons >.> It was definitely more of a sad confused wander than a full on hunt...but I digress. While I wasn't able to find the exact spot from before, I found an area with similar geological features, and after digging up about half a foot of loam around a small outcropping was rewarded with numerous individual rocks with all sorts of...things...all over them. I grabbed one giant 40lb chunk and a smaller one to play with and poke at to practice techniques. The smaller piece is on the bottom. Both samples were taken within feet of each other in a public forest just outside Ottawa, Ontario. The smaller piece I put in a bowl of water and gave a good scrub down with a toothbrush (brings me back to my field school days >.>) The surface and reverse of both are shown and I can provide more detailed pictures if necessary! I thought the crystallized shell things were pretty cool, there were quite a few more out there, but I'm completely unsure of what I'm looking at or if there was a way to extract them safely. I'm most curious as to what the circular things that litter the rocks are, but there seems to be a variety of other shells and tubey wormy things in there as well. Is there some sort of resource or database I could refer to for fossils from this particular time period/area? I'd feel bad constantly asking 'whats that!?" Anything neat here worth poking at with some of my archaeological pokers or have I found myself some very interesting garden rocks!
  23. Fossil ID please

  24. Fossil Books

    Does anyone recommend books books about Mesozoic marine chordates? ( German or English )
  25. Ear bone

    Hello, I found in last weekend my first ear bone in a Miocene - Burdigalian formation and I lwant to know from what animal. The fossil have +- 5 cm. Thanks
×