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Found 458 results

  1. Hello everyone! I have been a fossil hunter for two years now and wanted to share just some of my favorite finds so far! All were found in Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina. Thanks for looking!
  2. Mystery Shark's teeth

    Hello, These are also from our hunt in the Aquia formation of Charles Co. MD. Sharks of the world didn't give me much insight. The only species that I noticed where the enamel extends out on to the roots like this is the extinct goblin shark Anomotodon novus. I definitely have some teeth from that species I think but these are substantially different. These are larger, more robust and the have the cool extended enamel and bumps/cusplets on the shoulders of the labial side. Any thoughts?? (ruler in mm and squares 1/4") Kate
  3. Stratolamia striata?

    Hello, I am new here and new to fossil identification. These are shark teeth from the Aquia formation on the Maryland side of the Potomac. They come from Charles County. I have shark teeth of the world and so my IDs are based on that and the internet. I think all of these are Stratiolamia striata based on the grooves. Ruler is in mm and squares are 1/4" on each side. The last picture with only 2 teeth nearly touching seem different to me in that the striations don't extend very far up onto the teeth (unlike the others where they cover much of the crown. I am not sure if S. macrota also occurs at this site?? They are supposed to have striation only near the root. I have more from this trip but limited time so it will have to dribble out. Thanks for your time, Kate
  4. Novice question

    I found what appears to be a fossilized tooth on the shore of the Tidal Potomac River in MD. Could you help with the identification? Thanks!
  5. Finds from Flag Ponds in MD

    Hello! All of these are from two trips to the Flag Ponds Nature Park in Maryland I've made recently. Tried to do some identifying on my own with the Fossil Shark Teeth of the World book from Joe Cocke (ISBN 0-9715381-3-1), but there's so many to compare against that I'm not sure I'm even on the right track for the ideas that I had. And that's not even counting my few mystery teeth! Some more expert opinions than mine would be greatly appreciated. The first photo is all of the teeth that I found. Unfortunately, I seemed to have lost the little teeeeny tiny tooth when I was sorting through teeth in my identifying process, so there's now only 18. Which makes me sad, because the little one was my favorite! Handwriting translation: 1. Serratolamna ?? 2. Carcharias taurus 3. Hemipristis serra 4. Galeocerado cuvier 5. Carcharhinus limbatus 6. Alopias ?? All photos were taken beside a machinist ruler (inches, as the metric ruler refused to be found) for size comparison. I've tried to follow the guidelines for getting identification, but let me know if I need to add more photos.
  6. My Giant Alopiid Collection

    Hello Everyone, I’m rather fond of Giant Alopiids, and I have taken to collecting them. I find it strange that such a wonderful, yet mysterious creature remains relatively unknown and scantly studied. I may have space in my high school schedule for an independent study senior year, and I’ve considered using it to make a poster or paper on their morphology, taxonomy, phylogeny and such for The Rostrum or something. However, I’ve heard tell that there is already a comprehensive paper on giant alopiids in the works. We’ll see if there will be anything left for me to discuss. Anyway, collecting them is a slow process as they are quite rare and I am quite cheap (I have yet to find one myself). I thought I’d make a thread to show off what I have thus far and to keep them cataloged for myself. Hopefully this page will grow as time goes on Dashes are around 1 inch apart. South Carolina Alopias grandis
  7. Over the past few months work has been crazy (although in a VERY good way) and I haven't had the time to post summaries of my past few trips to the Calvert Cliffs formation. Long stories short, I was able to get down to the cliffs on a few occasions between Feb-April 2019. Most of the time I was able to go when tides were good, however on my most recent trip they were horrible. I've met a lot of awesome people along the beach and developed many good friendships...in fact I think that 95% of the people I met have been extremely friendly, genuine, willing to give advice, and just plain good people, which is something I love about this hobby. I was even able to talk the wifey into coming down once...of course she loved it, and of course she found a larger tooth than I ever have. About half my trips were to Brownies and the other half were to a private site that I have access to. The beaches have changed dramatically over these few months with numerous falls and spills, which highlights the importance of keeping your head on a swivel and always respecting the cliffs. On one occasion I made the 3 hour trip just to turn around about 2 hours later because the cliffs were so unstable. Hopefully we have a dry summer, the piles get a chance to wash out, and the cliffs become a bit more stable. Anyway, enough rambling. Below are some pics of my better finds from the two sites, I hope you enjoy them. No complete Meg yet, but I hope that changes when I make another trip down next week!
  8. Purse state park bivalve?

    Hi everyone, During a trip to Purse state park in Nanjemoy MD, I found an odd "rock" while looking for sharks teeth. It appears to be shaped like some kind of mussel or other bivalve. Any ideas what it might be? Unfortunately I don't have anything to measure it with, but it is approximately 2 1/2 inches long.
  9. Calvert Cliffs, MD id help please

    This was found on our trip to Calvert Cliffs, MD on the shore line. Dear husband thinks it's just a weird rock, but sons wanted to save it in case it was more. We're coming up with nothing with our novice search for what it could be, if anything. Any ideas or advice would be really appreciated! Thank you.
  10. Identification please

    I found this yesterday at Flag Pond, MD Is this a baby meg?
  11. Bayfront Park 03/30/19

    Hey everyone, A few days ago I finally got back out to Bayfront Park. According to the local forecast, it was going to be a cloudy day, but there was enough space in the sky during the sunrise for the sun to peek through and create a marvelous display of colors. I always love the scenery at Brownies, and that day was especially beautiful. The tide was relatively low when I arrived, but since I got there just after peak low tide, the water was rising for the entire time I was there, and it rose much faster than I would've liked. I didn't find any big teeth, but overall still had a great day collecting. I hope you enjoy my YouTube video of the hunt, embedded below. If you haven't already done so, please subscribe to my channel, leave a like on the video, and drop a comment as well to let me know what you thought! Thanks for the support! With the weather starting to finally warm up, I will hopefully be able to get out more frequently. Hoping for some low tides. Hoppe hunting!
  12. ID Wood, Iron, bones in MD?

    New to the sport. Found these yesterday at Calvert Cliffs and along the Potomac River. Big debate was weather the largest piece was bark that had been replaced by iron of if it was just a clump of iron from the bog. Several larger pieces observed on site in the cliffs and on the beach- some said they were wood; other just "bog iron". Please critique or help with id. Thank you.
  13. Hi all, For whatever reason, I never got around to posting this. After a relatively unsuccessful day at Bayfront Park back in 2018, my dad showed me this tooth, unsure of what it was. He said he had found it while sifting in the creek that runs under the bridge near the entrance of the park. I had never really bothered trying around that area because it was so far from any cliff exposures, but I suppose he proved that some of the best finds may be where you least expect them. The second he pulled out this tooth, my jaw dropped. It is a FLAWLESS cow shark symphyseal. I hadn't had a single one in my collection until then. I've never seen a better symphyseal than this one, not in a museum or anywhere online. It's absolutely perfect, with exquisite symmetry and phenomenal preservation. Undoubtedly the best tooth my dad has ever found. Although I was a bit jealous that he found it and not me, I was at the same time ecstatic because all of his finds go towards my collection. This beauty is one of my most prized teeth, as I am yet to see a more perfect specimen. The pictures do not do it justice in the slightest. It was found a while ago, but I thought you all would still like to see it. Enjoy!
  14. Nothing to crazy going on today. My wife found this piece of bone and she wants to know what it is. My initial thought is it was some random piece of croc but now that I’m looking at it closer I’m really unsure. Take a look tell me what you think
  15. Calvert Cliffs

    Hello there guys. Im planning to go to calvert cliffs this Saturday 3/9/19. Any suggestions on where to go and how i can maximize my chances of finding good fossils? Ive only ever fornd shark teeth at Myrtle Beach. Any help is awesome.
  16. Hey all, The Calvert Cliffs have been falling left and right recently. Countless cliff slides have led to plenty of new material becoming accessible on the beaches, but the unstable cliffs also call for extra caution. I decided to return to my favorite winter hunting location, Bayfront Park, to try and take advantage of the cliff falls. I thought it would be a good opportunity to film my first YouTube video, which I have been wanting to do for a while, so I brought my new handheld camera mount. Peak low tide was exactly at sunrise, so I woke up at 4 a.m. in order to arrive at the beach before then. Early mornings can be rough, but if you're getting up to do something you love it's a whole lot easier. When I got to the parking lot, it was still very dark and I actually had to use my phone's flashlight to hunt for the first few minutes before the sun began its ascent into the horizon. It was a very cloudy day, so unfortunately I wasn't treated with one of the gorgeous Brownies sunrises. Within 10 or 15 minutes or searching, I found one of the biggest teeth I've ever found at Brownies, a huge 2 inch mako in perfect condition. That's when I knew it was going to be a good day. Not too long after that, I stumbled across a circular object slightly covered by sand. It looked like it could be some kind of vertebra or possible a "cookie" (dolphin epiphysis), but there was only one way to find out. When I tried pulling it out, it didn't budge. I pulled harder. As it still wouldn't come out, I realized it must be much larger than it appeared on the surface. Throwing aside the rock next to it, I finally pulled out a beautiful cetacean vertebra! I've always wanted to find one, especially after running into a guy who found a dozen of them on my last Brownies trip, so I was ecstatic. I continued finding some very nice teeth. I also found another cetacean vertebra, this time a very different shape but in very good condition. Despite the harsh temperature and dangerous cliffs, there were quite a few other hunters out on the beach. At one point I ran into a man who had found two perfects Megs, each one about 2 inches. I hoped to find one for myself, but had no such luck. Regardless, I was extremely content with everything I found and began to make my way back to the car. This trip was one to remember, not only because of the awesome finds, but also the fun experience of filming the video. I kept this trip report rather short, because the video covers the detail I usually go into, and then some. Anyway, I've wanted to become a fossil hunting YouTuber pretty much ever since I began hunting, but I just never really got around to it until now. I love watching YouTubers like @addicted2fossils, and I hope others will find my videos to be entertaining and educational as well. I've posted the link to my video below, and I would really appreciate it if you would take a second to like the video, leave a comment, and subscribe to my channel. I'll be putting out many videos like this in the future. I have some very exciting trips coming up, including hunting at a private creek site and going to the annual Aurora Fossil Festival in NC! Stay tuned. Hoppe hunting!
  17. Hi Folks, Usually during spring break I am at work making maple syrup but this coming week it will be too cold for the sap to flow. I am planning a trip south from CT and would like to check out fossils in PA, MD, and WV. I'll probably leave March 6th and return March 10th or 11th. Certainly want to check out the Calvert Cliffs and see what I can find in PA and WV. Any tips or advice on location would be really appreciated, or, if you want to meet-up that would be even better. It is so great to meet other fossil enthusiasts. I don't mind the cold and could help out with gas money or buy lunch. Thanks, Dom
  18. After the long month without fossil hunting, we decided to go to Purse on a free weekend. Now that it is a former state park, it's a lot harder to find because there is no address to it, so hopefully it can recover from some of the hunting that has taken place upon it's shores. I really, really wanted some nice Macrotas after all the talk I had heard about them, and thankfully, Purse didn't disappoint. It was the middle of hunting season there, and we werent wearing anything particularly bright, it was a little nerve racking hearing the boom of gunshots far of in the distance. We started by going right towards the cliffs after hearing a comment about a big otodus found there. After only finding small things, including some nice Cretolamna and Carcharias, as well as a couple goblins, we turned left, and that was where things got interesting, still peppered with the occasional crack of a gun. My identification for Paleocene fossils isn't positive, because I'm used more to Miocene, but I believe the tooth on the right may be a Macrota. It's around an inch. The teeth kept racking up. We had easily found at least two hundred, and I really can't wait to identify and label them. We were both quite tired, being as we had gotten up pretty early that day and explored the whole beach. No otodus, but around 230 teeth and hopefully a big ole' Macrota!
  19. Id please

    Can anyone ID these two teeth for me please. Thanks!
  20. Maryland Paleocene 2/17/19

    Headed out to the potomac this morning and man was it nice out. Hit low tide and made my way to the cliffs, which all fallen right now btw. Found some nice sand tigers today’s and some smaller beaten otodus. Highlights of the day were a nice little croc tooth and a croc vert which is a first for me. I don’t seem to find much bone in the Aquia formation.
  21. Last summer I picked up a couple riker mounts and have been experimenting with different ways to display my collection. I finally decided to do a Brownies Beach Sampler. I wanted to put together a sample of all the different species that I have found there over the years. I also wanted to put in my best quality teeth, so size was not a factor. Enclosed in the mount is a Hemi, thresher, cowshark, hammerhead, angel, mako, meg, lemon, requiem, sandtiger, and two different tigers.
  22. After just over a year of fossil collecting, I have finally found my first Meg! On Thursday, the first semester of my senior year came to an end. The next day, Friday, school was closed for a teacher work day. I figured I'd make the most of my day off by heading out to Bayfront Park. What better way to celebrate making it through the first half of senior year? I though that because it was a Friday, and rather cold, not many people would be out on the beach because they'd either be at school, work, or home because of the weather. I was right. When I arrived at a little before noon, there were only a few cars in the parking lot, and not all of them were fellow hunters. I slipped on my waders and made my way down the path, shovel and sifter in hand. Funny enough, I never actually sifted a single screen, because I didn't need to. I had no idea the tide was going to be as low as it was. But boy, was it out there. Even with a few hours before peak low tide, the entire beach was exposed and the water was calm. I stopped briefly at the cove area that people so often underestimate, and within five minutes of stepping onto the beach found a perfect little cow shark tooth laying right out in the open. That's when I knew it was going to be a good day of hunting. The tide was probably the one of the lowest I've ever seen at Brownies, so I had plenty of ground to cover. Trying not to get ahead of myself, I made sure to still walk very slowly and scan over the ground thoroughly. After about an hour, I was walking down near the water on a part of the beach that is normally submerged when I stumbled across a large tooth, half buried in the sand. My heart stopped when I spotted it. It clearly had signs of a bourlette, so I immediately knew I was looking right at my first ever meg. I pulled out my phone and began recording. I prayed that it would be whole as I carefully pried it out of the sand. To my delight, it was mostly complete, with flawless serrations and an intact tip. It had a bit of damage and it was missing the actual bourlette (must've fallen off), but I didn't mind one bit. I cleaned it off and spent marveled at the amazing tooth I had just found. I couldn't believe what was happening. After calling my friends and family and sending them the video, I carefully wrapped the tooth in tissue paper and aluminum foil to insure that it would make it home safely. There was no way I was throwing that tooth in my waders pouch like I do with the rest! I would have been more than happy if I hadn't found a single other tooth that day, but that was not the case. I continued south, and kept looking towards the water, hoping for some other nice finds. I found a fair share of decent makos, and another large but beaten up cow shark tooth. I eventually ran into a man named Scott who was hunting for the first time ever, and he showed me his backpack full of cetacean verts, including a very large whale vert. He told me he had been there since before sunrise, and hadn't had much luck with teeth, but clearly was finding verts left and right. I of course answered his question, "Any luck?" with a prompt "Oh yes, I hit the jackpot today." He congratulated me on my first meg, and we talked for a while more. He was a really cool guy, and I enjoyed helping him identify some finds and learn more about the cliffs. After my exchange with Scott, I went farther down the beach, finding more decent teeth and a few verts. At one point, I saw what was clearly another megatooth in the sand, and held my breath as I unearthed it. Unfortunately, it was only the tip of what was most likely a very large tooth. A true heartbreaker, but with everything else I had already found I couldn't complain. As the tide began to come in, I decided to head back to the entrance and make my way home. I caught up to Scott again, and we talked about my plans to become a paleontologist as we walked back up to our cars. I can say with some confidence that this was my best Brownies Beach trip ever, and perhaps even my best trip ever, period. I ended up finding a meg (although it's technically a C. chubutensis I believe), some very nice makos, a few complete cow shark teeth, hemis, sand tigers, a lot of tigers, a ray barb/spine, and a lot of fish and shark verts. I honestly don't think I could be much happier with my finds, and I am beyond thrilled to add my first megatooth to my collection! As far as a public site like Brownies goes, this is considered an extremely productive day, especially considering I only really hunted for about four hours, compared to my usual 6-7+. 2019 is certainly off to an amazing start; this is only my second hunt of the year! Thank you so much for reading my report, and here's to many more megs in the future! Here's a link to my YouTube video of finding the tooth. I will eventually be making full length videos of my hunts in the future, so please subscribe to the channel if you like! Thank you all. Also be sure to check out the Hop 5 post that will be up soon, and cast your vote for the tripmaker. Hoppe Hunting!
  23. Looking to find out as much about this vertebrae piece found at Calvert Cliffs, MD.
  24. I'm out of time!!!!

    Hey all! Well, if you've read some of my previous posts you'll see that throughout 2018 I've been working in Maryland and Virginia. While here I've been visiting some of the local haunts along the Atlantic to find.... really anything, and I have! HOWEVER, I have yet to find a single shark tooth!!! The rub now is timing. I am about to accept a new position with a company and my time on the Bay is coming to an end. I'm here this week and plan on visiting Matoaka Beach for the first time tomorrow. I am going to leave my hotel in Columbia, MD at 8am. Any suggestions, tricks, hints.... scooby snacks????? I've been talking about finding my son a Meg tooth for a year now and I'm coming up with squat! hahaha
  25. Flags Pond 01/04/19

    My kids had a bucket list for winter break, and one of the items was to go to a beach. Yes, my kids are the ones who enjoy going to beaches in winter! So on Friday, Jan. 4, I bundled the kids up and we headed out to Flags Pond, getting there at about 9 a.m., as the tide was coming in. I can usually find some nice small teeth washing up with the tide there, and my kids and I got to work combing the beach. We had more luck with rays, but we still found a decent number of teeth. My oldest enjoys finding the coral pieces, which are easier for him to spot. My youngest kept trying to go swimming, and I had quite a time trying to keep her from belly flopping into the small waves. One thing I didn't like about this trip is that it was hard for me to help my kids find teeth, as they were washing up, and if you didn't grab them right away, they washed away. I like to find teeth, then circle a large area in the sand around the tooth and tell my kids to find the fossil. I tried that a few times, and the waves washed the tooth away before my kids could spot it. They got frustrated and eventually gave up and began burying "treasure" in the sand. (There may be some buried Cheez-its in the sand for future treasure seekers!) Eventually, my youngest managed to submerge a good part of her body in the cold water when I wasn't looking -- sneaky! She was dressed in a snowsuit and boots, but she still got wet, and I didn't have enough backup clothes on hand. So back we trudged to the car. In my haste to get my youngest in dry clothes and into the warm car, I managed to forget my sand sifter. Alas! But, on the plus side, I walked out with some fossil finds and a wonderful day with my kids in a beautiful location!
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