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Found 130 results

  1. DDMA (DREDGING DISPOSAL MANAGEMENT AREA)

    My question is below but here is a brief intro! Thank you all for the great insight into fossil hunting. I'm Josh, from Florida and have been hunting relics for about 5 years now (27yo), from metal detecting to surface hunting. Just a hobby that I do occasionally, mostly to learn about the history of our land and try to preserve it before it's all worn away. I find the research in hunting almost more fun than the actual craft. Although, it's tough here in FL to be caught "preserving history" .....give me a break. Anyways, i've been lucky enough to have a job as a Surveyor which has put me in places that I hate sometimes.... but also gives me access to pieces of land that a lot of hunters dream of in FL. I've been able to find old bottles, arrowheads, and relics at work without the hassle of getting permissions(that would be mostly impossible to get otherwise). So when i'm hunting on my time I always find it so hard to find places to do so freely. Anyways, enough about me. Here is my question regarding a potential megalodon tooth site, definitely shark tooth site. I've found some nice dredging in my area, with dredge disposal management area listed on the bid. It's accessible from what I can tell on the maps but labeled as "District-Owned" and overseen by General Contractor/Engineer. Has anyone hunted a site like this in Florida? It's essentially a dredge spoil island with management. If so, did you wait for the project to finish and come in after? Approach the site manager? Hunt it without permission? Thank you for any insight, it's greatly appreciated!
  2. Doing alright since I moved down to FL! No more dinosaur footprints down here, but there is an abundance of teeth!
  3. Back to the Peace River!

    Went back to the river yesterday inspite of the high gauge readings and strong discharge reports. The reports were spot on! The water level was visibly higher and the flow was really moving along. It was a tough pull to get the kayak up river to my favorite spot. I passed several new obstructions on the way, including a 25' to 30' palm tree, root ball included, sitting in the river where there was no sign of it last week. When I arrived at my intended dig spot the usual sandy shoreline I have been beaching the kayak on did not exist. I had to climb the bank and tie off the kayak to a tree to keep it from washing downstream. My usual easy walk to start digging was hampered by deep water. I decided to climb the bank to avoid taking an unwanted swim and to keep from having to climb over a couple of downed tree trunks. This proved a bad idea as there was deep grass, numerous holes and a deep gully in the way - kept thinking about gators and snakes hiding below. So, back to the water and a slow careful advance over the tree trunks and through the deep water. I managed to get there without taking a dunk! Last Friday I found my first partial Mastodon tooth in this spot. Yesterday, within 15 minutes of starting to dig another, bigger partial Mastodon tooth came up! This one was clinging to the side of the shovel with the shovel blade between the teeth. I nearly dropped it I was so surprised. Luckily I got it into the screen before it could take a dive back in. By way of comparison below is a picture of last weeks tooth with the one from yesterday. My time was limited yesterday, only could spend about 2 hours digging. In addition to the Mastodon partial I also found a nice meg and horse molar. All in all - Great Day!
  4. Land site near Venice FL Just the root was exposed. I wish I took a pic but I didn't think it was much when I pulled on it! It was like the sword in the Stone!!
  5. I got to do my first Meg Ledge trip yesterday. The weather was nasty on the “offshore” ledge, so we hit the “inshore” one. So ~25 miles out instead of ~40. All three dives were at ~100’. The attached pictures contain the haul from my final dive of the day. Almost got a 6” tooth. I’m curious to see how they look after they’ve been cleaned up.
  6. Hi there! I would like to know if this megalodon tooth is real or fake. My son says it's real due to all the damage on it, but I'm not so sure. The Seller says it's 5 and a half inches long and say the bought it at an estate sale in Texas. Thanks!
  7. First let me just say that my wife is awesome! Secondly, today is my birthday! My before mentioned awesome wife has surprised me with the purchase of a nice Megalodon tooth! It’s my first one! I had been recently talking about wanting to check out a website that deals in meg teeth and is run by a forum member. She took the liberty to check it out herself and correspond with the owner (since she knows nothing about fossils ) Unfortunately, due to some shipping issues it hasn’t arrived yet, but it should be here in the next few days. I was too excited to wait to share! Here is a picture from the website. I’ll post my own pics of the tooth as soon as it arrives. L1: 4.21" L2: 4.10" Width: 3.07"
  8. English Meg

    From the album Suffolk Sharks Teeth

    Very water worn 59mm English Meg. Found at Bawdsey.
  9. English Meg

    From the album Suffolk Sharks Teeth

    Very water worn 59mm English Meg. Found at Bawdsey.
  10. How are fossils formed

    Going really basic here being new on the fossil game i wanted to know how a fossil gets created because i have read that the bone gets replaced by rock or sediments and they take its original form but if that's the case then we are not holding teeth, we are holding rocks in the form of teeth when holding a fossilized tooth for example. I don't really know so if someone could please explain to me if the fossil is actual tooth like it was back then or it becomes rock and the general process it would be much appreciated.
  11. So i have a small fossil collection and i want to learn how to study teeth and their anatomy the teeth i already have are from spinosaurus, mosasaur, carcharodontosaurus and megalodon if anyone could help me learn how to do it i would be really thankful. Thanks.
  12. How to study fossils.

    So having a small fossil collection i have thought of the possibility of studying the fossils especially the dinosaur teeth but the problem is im not a scientist so i don't know how to study them so if someone could tell me if cheap fossils like these could be studied and how it would be largely appreciated. (Collection includes 2 spinosaurus teeth, a meg tooth, 2 mosasaur teeth, mammoth hair, carcharodontosaurus tooth) Thanks.
  13. Hello can anyone help is this a good meg tooth to buy is this poor quality? its nearly 6" in size can anyone give me details of things that are wrong with it im not a expert but i want to buy a high quality meg tooth thats over 5" for my collection ive searched some the websites suggested on here but all the meg teeth seems to have alot of chips ect other then this one please help and thankyou very much
  14. First Florida Creek Meg!

    Hi all. Found my first Florida creek meg!! It's broken but holy cow, the feeling of when I saw it in the screen!!! I'll gladly take it. Went on a fossil hunting tour this past weekend on a creek near the Peace River. Found some awesome other stuff as well. Water was so low!!!
  15. Dear Forum I`m thinking about buying a red Meg from the St.Mary river. Found the following one and would like to get some opinions concerning restoration and repairs. Well there should`t be any.
  16. First Florida Megs!!

    Finally found my first megs!!! The largest I found within minutes of starting to look. They are a bit beat up but I'm a happy camper Also found some other cool stuff, one being a very rough looking whale tooth!
  17. So I was recently going thru some Florida tooth material (Mio/Plio-Pleistocene) from years ago and realized I had lumped a bunch of this stuff in a packet without investigating them too thoroughly. I started to bug Jeff about several and thought I'd see what you all thought as well so I could learn something more from you all. So just 4 teeth for this thread. I was noticing #1's serrations were pretty coarse and well developed and unusual and I was asking about its possibilities and the meg possibility came up. I then found #2 tonight in another bag and it has some similarities to #1. Neither seem very thick/robust or show a bourlette but their serrations are definitely different than most I have seen. #3 has those finer serrations and shape I usually have put into the Carcharhinus ID bucket. Could they all be Carcharhinus? And lastly #4 may be pathological? What say you all? I know messing with single teeth ID's is pushing the envelope but appreciate any thoughts... Here's another view of just # 1 and #2. And lastly #4: Thanks for the help. Regards, Chris
  18. This is my first trip report in quite a while. I probably need to go back and do some others to catch-up on some other neat finds. My son and I went to Gainesville yesterday with Wild Kyle. We had a great time, and productive day. I found a nice dolphin vertebra in someone’s spoil pile and my son actually dropped a posterior meg in the spoil for the next person. (I realized it was missing when we were taking a wrap up photo, and I went back and found it.) I was really excited to find the ray plate. The condition was not great, but i love finding these things fused. Kyle pointed out a croc scute in my screen that I definitely would have missed and he found part of a dugong skull cap. The nicest meg had a small crack, which broke on the way home, so I had to do a repair.
  19. It's been a while since I posted a trip but today was one that I won't forget in a long time, I was lucky enough to be there when my wife found a 4 3/4" meg...that my dumb butt walked by at least twice! DOH! Beautiful day on the river, falling water all day long and the temperature was awesome. Total haul of teeth The megs Too bad this one was missing the root. I dug the rib bone out of a chunk of matrix Atlas found by my wife Love the colors on this Found a couple of teeth hiding in some chunks of matrix
  20. Mexico Meg Teeth

    Has anyone seen Meg teeth from Mexico? I'm currently working in Mexico and one of my coworkers is trying to sell me a big Meg tooth that looks very similar to the North Carolina teeth.
  21. Hogtown Creek finds

    Hey everyone, Here's some of my finds at Hogtown Creek in Gainesville, FL. I'm pretty confident those are some juvenile meg teeth. Both found next to each other in some heavy clay deposits, which explains the coloration. I was hoping maybe I could soak them in something to bring out the enamel color.. Any ideas? Not sure about the other fossils. Is that some sort of prehistoric cephalopod? The fossil next to it is smooth on the bottom, and I can only describe it as looking like an upside down mushroom. On the other picture, someone else told me the one was a crocodile tooth (what kind??). The one next to that is a complete mystery - but a very cool looking find. It's broke, but the back has two sharp points. Any help you can provide in ID'ing these fossils would be greatly appreciated!! Sam
  22. Megalodon or Chubutensis?

    Hello everyone, If you saw my most recent trip report, you know that I just found my first meg tooth! However, I'm not entirely sure whether the tooth is from Carcharocles megalodon or Carcharocles chubutensis. The tooth was found at Bayfront Park/Brownies Beach, which is the northernmost part of the Calvert Cliffs. The sediments exposed in the cliffs here are from the Calvert Formation, roughly 18-22 million years old. This would be right around the time when the great Megalodon first emerged. I remember reading that the majority of megateeth found at Brownies are chubs, but that megs have also been found there. What I'd like to know is which one my tooth is: Meg or Chub? It looks to me like if the tooth were complete, it would have the defining residual cusps of chubutensis, but unfortunately the blade is broken on both sides right by the root. The bourlette is missing, but that is a characteristic of every shark in the mega lineage so that doesn't really matter. The tooth is approximately 1 3/4 inches, and not quite as thick as I would've expected. As you can see on my trip report and Hop 5 post, my current ID for this tooth is C. chubutensis, but that is subject to change should someone with better knowledge on megatooth identification give their opinion. One last possibility is that it may be a transitional meg, meaning the shark was a blurred line between megalodon and chubutensis. Any input is appreciated. Thanks!
  23. After just over a year of fossil collecting, I have finally found my first Meg! On Thursday, the first semester of my senior year came to an end. The next day, Friday, school was closed for a teacher work day. I figured I'd make the most of my day off by heading out to Bayfront Park. What better way to celebrate making it through the first half of senior year? I though that because it was a Friday, and rather cold, not many people would be out on the beach because they'd either be at school, work, or home because of the weather. I was right. When I arrived at a little before noon, there were only a few cars in the parking lot, and not all of them were fellow hunters. I slipped on my waders and made my way down the path, shovel and sifter in hand. Funny enough, I never actually sifted a single screen, because I didn't need to. I had no idea the tide was going to be as low as it was. But boy, was it out there. Even with a few hours before peak low tide, the entire beach was exposed and the water was calm. I stopped briefly at the cove area that people so often underestimate, and within five minutes of stepping onto the beach found a perfect little cow shark tooth laying right out in the open. That's when I knew it was going to be a good day of hunting. The tide was probably the one of the lowest I've ever seen at Brownies, so I had plenty of ground to cover. Trying not to get ahead of myself, I made sure to still walk very slowly and scan over the ground thoroughly. After about an hour, I was walking down near the water on a part of the beach that is normally submerged when I stumbled across a large tooth, half buried in the sand. My heart stopped when I spotted it. It clearly had signs of a bourlette, so I immediately knew I was looking right at my first ever meg. I pulled out my phone and began recording. I prayed that it would be whole as I carefully pried it out of the sand. To my delight, it was mostly complete, with flawless serrations and an intact tip. It had a bit of damage and it was missing the actual bourlette (must've fallen off), but I didn't mind one bit. I cleaned it off and spent marveled at the amazing tooth I had just found. I couldn't believe what was happening. After calling my friends and family and sending them the video, I carefully wrapped the tooth in tissue paper and aluminum foil to insure that it would make it home safely. There was no way I was throwing that tooth in my waders pouch like I do with the rest! I would have been more than happy if I hadn't found a single other tooth that day, but that was not the case. I continued south, and kept looking towards the water, hoping for some other nice finds. I found a fair share of decent makos, and another large but beaten up cow shark tooth. I eventually ran into a man named Scott who was hunting for the first time ever, and he showed me his backpack full of cetacean verts, including a very large whale vert. He told me he had been there since before sunrise, and hadn't had much luck with teeth, but clearly was finding verts left and right. I of course answered his question, "Any luck?" with a prompt "Oh yes, I hit the jackpot today." He congratulated me on my first meg, and we talked for a while more. He was a really cool guy, and I enjoyed helping him identify some finds and learn more about the cliffs. After my exchange with Scott, I went farther down the beach, finding more decent teeth and a few verts. At one point, I saw what was clearly another megatooth in the sand, and held my breath as I unearthed it. Unfortunately, it was only the tip of what was most likely a very large tooth. A true heartbreaker, but with everything else I had already found I couldn't complain. As the tide began to come in, I decided to head back to the entrance and make my way home. I caught up to Scott again, and we talked about my plans to become a paleontologist as we walked back up to our cars. I can say with some confidence that this was my best Brownies Beach trip ever, and perhaps even my best trip ever, period. I ended up finding a meg (although it's technically a C. chubutensis I believe), some very nice makos, a few complete cow shark teeth, hemis, sand tigers, a lot of tigers, a ray barb/spine, and a lot of fish and shark verts. I honestly don't think I could be much happier with my finds, and I am beyond thrilled to add my first megatooth to my collection! As far as a public site like Brownies goes, this is considered an extremely productive day, especially considering I only really hunted for about four hours, compared to my usual 6-7+. 2019 is certainly off to an amazing start; this is only my second hunt of the year! Thank you so much for reading my report, and here's to many more megs in the future! Here's a link to my YouTube video of finding the tooth. I will eventually be making full length videos of my hunts in the future, so please subscribe to the channel if you like! Thank you all. Also be sure to check out the Hop 5 post that will be up soon, and cast your vote for the tripmaker. Hoppe Hunting!
  24. I'm out of time!!!!

    Hey all! Well, if you've read some of my previous posts you'll see that throughout 2018 I've been working in Maryland and Virginia. While here I've been visiting some of the local haunts along the Atlantic to find.... really anything, and I have! HOWEVER, I have yet to find a single shark tooth!!! The rub now is timing. I am about to accept a new position with a company and my time on the Bay is coming to an end. I'm here this week and plan on visiting Matoaka Beach for the first time tomorrow. I am going to leave my hotel in Columbia, MD at 8am. Any suggestions, tricks, hints.... scooby snacks????? I've been talking about finding my son a Meg tooth for a year now and I'm coming up with squat! hahaha
  25. Hey guys, This tooth was recently purchased by a family member and they gave it to me as a Christmas present. They don't know much about fossils and thought it was the real deal. However soon after getting my hands on it I could tell it was a fake or at least partially a fake. The root was too big and it smelled kind of strange. I didn't have the heart to tell my family member that it was fake. It had only been in the draw around 10 days and it literally started falling apart. At this point we tried to contact the seller as they had listed it as a real genuine tooth (they mentioned small restorations but not that the entire root was fake). I didn't get a reply and this angered me as it wasn't cheap. It cost over £400. The guy is still selling fakes and people are buying them. I don't want anyone to feel as disappointed as I did. He even has a fake tooth on there right now. It's frustrating because it ruins it for everyone else who is interested in collecting real fossils. As mentioned the whole root was fake and was like a pink putty. After poking around more the whole thing crumbled in my hand. Even the tooth itself had strange white stuff embedded in it and started to chip off. I'm sure many of you are great at spoting fakes but perhaps this could help a new member or someone who's not sure about these kind of things. Thanks for reading!
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