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Found 109 results

  1. Megalodon or Chubutensis?

    Hello everyone, If you saw my most recent trip report, you know that I just found my first meg tooth! However, I'm not entirely sure whether the tooth is from Carcharocles megalodon or Carcharocles chubutensis. The tooth was found at Bayfront Park/Brownies Beach, which is the northernmost part of the Calvert Cliffs. The sediments exposed in the cliffs here are from the Calvert Formation, roughly 18-22 million years old. This would be right around the time when the great Megalodon first emerged. I remember reading that the majority of megateeth found at Brownies are chubs, but that megs have also been found there. What I'd like to know is which one my tooth is: Meg or Chub? It looks to me like if the tooth were complete, it would have the defining residual cusps of chubutensis, but unfortunately the blade is broken on both sides right by the root. The bourlette is missing, but that is a characteristic of every shark in the mega lineage so that doesn't really matter. The tooth is approximately 1 3/4 inches, and not quite as thick as I would've expected. As you can see on my trip report and Hop 5 post, my current ID for this tooth is C. chubutensis, but that is subject to change should someone with better knowledge on megatooth identification give their opinion. One last possibility is that it may be a transitional meg, meaning the shark was a blurred line between megalodon and chubutensis. Any input is appreciated. Thanks!
  2. After just over a year of fossil collecting, I have finally found my first Meg! On Thursday, the first semester of my senior year came to an end. The next day, Friday, school was closed for a teacher work day. I figured I'd make the most of my day off by heading out to Bayfront Park. What better way to celebrate making it through the first half of senior year? I though that because it was a Friday, and rather cold, not many people would be out on the beach because they'd either be at school, work, or home because of the weather. I was right. When I arrived at a little before noon, there were only a few cars in the parking lot, and not all of them were fellow hunters. I slipped on my waders and made my way down the path, shovel and sifter in hand. Funny enough, I never actually sifted a single screen, because I didn't need to. I had no idea the tide was going to be as low as it was. But boy, was it out there. Even with a few hours before peak low tide, the entire beach was exposed and the water was calm. I stopped briefly at the cove area that people so often underestimate, and within five minutes of stepping onto the beach found a perfect little cow shark tooth laying right out in the open. That's when I knew it was going to be a good day of hunting. The tide was probably the one of the lowest I've ever seen at Brownies, so I had plenty of ground to cover. Trying not to get ahead of myself, I made sure to still walk very slowly and scan over the ground thoroughly. After about an hour, I was walking down near the water on a part of the beach that is normally submerged when I stumbled across a large tooth, half buried in the sand. My heart stopped when I spotted it. It clearly had signs of a bourlette, so I immediately knew I was looking right at my first ever meg. I pulled out my phone and began recording. I prayed that it would be whole as I carefully pried it out of the sand. To my delight, it was mostly complete, with flawless serrations and an intact tip. It had a bit of damage and it was missing the actual bourlette (must've fallen off), but I didn't mind one bit. I cleaned it off and spent marveled at the amazing tooth I had just found. I couldn't believe what was happening. After calling my friends and family and sending them the video, I carefully wrapped the tooth in tissue paper and aluminum foil to insure that it would make it home safely. There was no way I was throwing that tooth in my waders pouch like I do with the rest! I would have been more than happy if I hadn't found a single other tooth that day, but that was not the case. I continued south, and kept looking towards the water, hoping for some other nice finds. I found a fair share of decent makos, and another large but beaten up cow shark tooth. I eventually ran into a man named Scott who was hunting for the first time ever, and he showed me his backpack full of cetacean verts, including a very large whale vert. He told me he had been there since before sunrise, and hadn't had much luck with teeth, but clearly was finding verts left and right. I of course answered his question, "Any luck?" with a prompt "Oh yes, I hit the jackpot today." He congratulated me on my first meg, and we talked for a while more. He was a really cool guy, and I enjoyed helping him identify some finds and learn more about the cliffs. After my exchange with Scott, I went farther down the beach, finding more decent teeth and a few verts. At one point, I saw what was clearly another megatooth in the sand, and held my breath as I unearthed it. Unfortunately, it was only the tip of what was most likely a very large tooth. A true heartbreaker, but with everything else I had already found I couldn't complain. As the tide began to come in, I decided to head back to the entrance and make my way home. I caught up to Scott again, and we talked about my plans to become a paleontologist as we walked back up to our cars. I can say with some confidence that this was my best Brownies Beach trip ever, and perhaps even my best trip ever, period. I ended up finding a meg (although it's technically a C. chubutensis I believe), some very nice makos, a few complete cow shark teeth, hemis, sand tigers, a lot of tigers, a ray barb/spine, and a lot of fish and shark verts. I honestly don't think I could be much happier with my finds, and I am beyond thrilled to add my first megatooth to my collection! As far as a public site like Brownies goes, this is considered an extremely productive day, especially considering I only really hunted for about four hours, compared to my usual 6-7+. 2019 is certainly off to an amazing start; this is only my second hunt of the year! Thank you so much for reading my report, and here's to many more megs in the future! Here's a link to my YouTube video of finding the tooth. I will eventually be making full length videos of my hunts in the future, so please subscribe to the channel if you like! Thank you all. Also be sure to check out the Hop 5 post that will be up soon, and cast your vote for the tripmaker. Hoppe Hunting!
  3. I'm out of time!!!!

    Hey all! Well, if you've read some of my previous posts you'll see that throughout 2018 I've been working in Maryland and Virginia. While here I've been visiting some of the local haunts along the Atlantic to find.... really anything, and I have! HOWEVER, I have yet to find a single shark tooth!!! The rub now is timing. I am about to accept a new position with a company and my time on the Bay is coming to an end. I'm here this week and plan on visiting Matoaka Beach for the first time tomorrow. I am going to leave my hotel in Columbia, MD at 8am. Any suggestions, tricks, hints.... scooby snacks????? I've been talking about finding my son a Meg tooth for a year now and I'm coming up with squat! hahaha
  4. Hey guys, This tooth was recently purchased by a family member and they gave it to me as a Christmas present. They don't know much about fossils and thought it was the real deal. However soon after getting my hands on it I could tell it was a fake or at least partially a fake. The root was too big and it smelled kind of strange. I didn't have the heart to tell my family member that it was fake. It had only been in the draw around 10 days and it literally started falling apart. At this point we tried to contact the seller as they had listed it as a real genuine tooth (they mentioned small restorations but not that the entire root was fake). I didn't get a reply and this angered me as it wasn't cheap. It cost over £400. The guy is still selling fakes and people are buying them. I don't want anyone to feel as disappointed as I did. He even has a fake tooth on there right now. It's frustrating because it ruins it for everyone else who is interested in collecting real fossils. As mentioned the whole root was fake and was like a pink putty. After poking around more the whole thing crumbled in my hand. Even the tooth itself had strange white stuff embedded in it and started to chip off. I'm sure many of you are great at spoting fakes but perhaps this could help a new member or someone who's not sure about these kind of things. Thanks for reading!
  5. Shark Tank

    Hi all Mrs Rico and I made this display tonight. It is made with a bell jar , upside down glass planter/bowl and fairy lights. I will add more lights to the base tomorrow. I think it looks cool with the shark’s head floating in the space of the bell jar. I do like the curio/macabre and scientific look. I hope you all like it and thanks for looking. Cheers Bobby
  6. The teeth in the photos are what I’m looking to trade. Interested in all sorts of fossils and willing to entertain trades abroad as well.
  7. Megalodon, Miocene, the thoot is glued on matrix. available
  8. Any day out on the river is a great day but today was something special, plentiful teeth and a couple of rarities! My wife started the day off right by finding a symphyseal cow shark tooth, I still can't hardly believe that she found it! Later on I stepped over a log to find a Meg leaning up against another log. Later on in the day, my daughters were hunting together and when I got home and checked out what they found, there was an Alopias grandis there! I finished the day off by spying a 2 1/2" Mako sitting high and dry...I couldn't ask for a better day on the river with my family! Total haul. Definite trip maker here! I was very pleased with this! My wife was not going to be outdone and found her own. Of course my kids got into the action as well. I closed out the day with this beauty.
  9. Megs inlaid with pyrite?

    Hey All, Up to this point I have mostly been personally hunting for megs and whatever other fossils Calvert Cliffs will offer. However recently I have been searching online to purchase a few larger megs that are not possible for me to find. One thing I noticed is there seems to be a growing number of megs "inlaid with pyrite". It gives the fossil a gold/silver/ appearance. on the enamel. These megs are not typically cheap or small. There are many 5 and 6 inch megs with pyrite and I see some selling for $1,000 USD +. My question is: nothing about the "inlaid with pyrite" is natural, right? It is essentially "restoration", like polishing? And second, to each their own, but are people paying a premium for this "look"? Or is it mainly a way to restore/disguise damaged teeth? If the megs are selling then good for the vendors however I understand restoring or even polishing teeth (as long as the vendor is upfront). But I just found the pyrite be an odd practice in the world of megs. Thanks!
  10. Bone valley blues

    Found a spot with great colored bone valley formation fossils. Everything has nice blue tent to it. But sadly no complete meg teeth from there yet.
  11. Hi everyone, I moved to Clearwater a while ago but I work right between Bradenton and Sarasota. I’d like to start doing some little creek hunts or similar after work but I have been having trouble finding good locations. If you can help point me in a the right direction I would really appreciate it. Or, if you are local and would like to join me that would be great as well! Thanks in advance
  12. Indonesian Megalodon teeth

    Hi everyone. Just a quick question regarding Megalodon teeth from Indonesia. They appear to be quite uncommon as regards that location? The few specimens I’ve seen recently appear to be of a very light coloration as well. Is this typical of Indonesian meg teeth?Will try to get photos.
  13. Posterior Megs?

    Hi all, the other day I went out hunting found some really cool stuff, which I'll post soon, but I find these 3 interesting teeth which I think are posterior megs, though I think one (smallest) is more likely than the other two. They were found in Havelock NC.
  14. Shark tooth?

    Hi everyone, I’m new to this community but have always had an interest in fossils and artifacts. This week I was in So California for work and walked down to the beach one night and found this. It looked like a large shark tooth but it didn’t look like images online. I’ve seen Megalodon teeth before and this looks like a petrified version. If it’s just a rock, that’s okay too. Thanks in advance for your responses.
  15. A few more megs

    A month later and some more megs after several more trips. Not as good as our first few trips out but our collection is growing. I think the best find was the big gator tooth toward top right. We’ll be headed out ASAP for,hopefully, some more success
  16. Calvert cliffs 6/18

    I decided to try my luck at motoaka cabins today despite it being around 90 degrees. I haven’t been to brownies in a good while. Mostly because it’s always packed and the water is against the cliffs almost all the time in the summer. If I go to brownies it’s in the winter when the tides are lower. I found two things that I never find at matoaka. A huge dead sea turtle and a decent meg. Also found a nice mako. I ended up walking around 4 miles, and I’d say it was worth it. Matoaka I think is somewhat underrated, and if you’re lucky it can produce some good stuff. Probably more quality than quantity, which is okay with me. Thanks for looking, Conor
  17. Charleston SC

    What do I have here guys? just found this one today.
  18. Shark Tooth ID (meg?)

    Hi guys and gals, Looking through some of my teeth from the past couple of trips and was looking to get an ID on this tooth. Is it a little meg? Thanks!
  19. Easter Suprise

    My best hunt to date: After family events, I had some time to go hunting today (easter), the first warm time I’ve had to hunt when I actually knew what I was doing. The tide was not ideal, but not dangerous. As I walked down the beach, many where there Hunting. I correctly assumed that these were mostly normal beach goers, and I was down south alone with few fresh footprints. I walked the whole length, it took about an hour forty to the end and back. As I walked, I found a nice common thresher and I cracked a grin. I found another and that kept the smile. I then found a complete cow shark tooth and was rather chuffed, and then BANG! MEG! My first after half a year of hunting the cliffs. It’s worn and has been stress fractures, most would not hold it in high esteem but being my first I was ecstatic! This meg will always hold a special place in my heart. I said a quick prayer and continued forth not caring if I found anything else, my trip had already been made. Then I found some decent White sharks, which I have for some reason been missing. Some nice hemis hopped into my view as well. Eventually I decided it was time to go back. On the way back I noticed someone had put a block of a hard clay (actually more of a limestone I think) on a small boulder. I took a look and saw there was a chunk of bone in it! This was a little over 1.75 miles from the entrance, so someone must have picked it up, realized it wasn’t worth the trouble and left it. I’m not so easily detered. So I carried this ungainly 20 pound mass ( I’m in the tennis team so you can infer my strength) the almost two miles through the highish tide which concealed under water boulders. Perhaps stupid, but worth it. I felt pride from the strange looks I got from the beach goers, perhaps they thought I had found something important. Any way I’m going to photograph everything tomorrow but here’s what I have now, enjoy.
  20. Carcharocles megalodon 05

    From the album Sharks and their prey ....

    Carcharocles megalodon Bone Valley, Florida Bite damage with marks visible ....

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  21. So 2018 has been on a roller coaster of sorts. The east coast was hit with a prolonged cold snap to start the year which froze all the beaches up and most of the Chesapeake Bay too. So there was no hunting at all for the first week and a half of the year. The weather finally broke and i hit the beach i was luck enough to find a nice 2" meg/chub and the tripmaker was a pathological hubbell megalodon i was super stoked. Then the cold came back and once again the beaches froze right back up, so I was back off the beach again. The weather broke and all the ice went away and i hit the beach yesterday and killed it. Found the beautiful lower lateral meg that is just under 3.5", a couple nice makos, the 2 1/4' chub and a super sharp little meg. I also cleaned up on cetecean verts and chesapectens and an inner earbone it has been an up and down kind of month. Here is to a productive 2018. Hope everyone does well.
  22. After too many days of cold weather, we were determined to head out to the river during some spring time weather...we weren't prepared for what we found! Snow and ice was stacked up all over the place, for the most part I thought the trip was a bust but we decided to go for a hike anyway. After about a 1/4 mile, we saw some open water along the shore and headed for it...it wasn't much but we had about 600 yards of open beach and mostly open water...there was still some skim ice and slush but we at least could say that we were going to get to hunt a little. We weren't there 10 minutes until I heard a boat running around on the river, I thought to myself, "who is crazy enough to be out on the river with this much ice?" As I watched the boat, it turned and came towards me...yep, I knew who was as crazy as me to be out, it was @SailingAlongToo with some other legends out and about. Always a treat to run into him on the water and chatting a little bit, he was off acting as an ice breaker! LOL! After he left we got back to searching and lo and behold, we started to have some success. We were only wearing boots so I took the water since my boots are taller than my wife's, as I looked down I saw a beautiful site, a Mako! I have many that are much nicer than this one but this was my largest by far. A little while later I heard a squeal of delight from my wife, I looked back to see her holding up a small Meg. All-in all, it wasn't a huge haul today but it was nice to be out on the river again, I'm looing forward to when the ice melts away though I don't think it will be anytime soon. Working our way through the snow and ice. Something to search. My wife scores! Total haul Meg and Mako
  23. Been going through more boxes of fossils and found a bunch of stuff I didnt know I had, and Im not a tooth collector but ran into a whole bunch of sharks teeth I didn't know I had. I had to keep this one. Plus with my son and his buddy there I gave several away. Just the way I am.. Oh, also found some kind of dino tooth too. Quite nice. Amazes me what ive forgotten? Some of this stuff has been in boxes for many many years. Oh, this little bugger measure in at 5 3/4 inches. A really nice tooth. For me that is. RB
  24. Added three new teeth in recent times to my collection of exotic meg teeth, I'd like to share since there,s not to many images from these localities out there, the photos maybe in shabby quality because I pulled them directly from my Instagram page to save time. 1) This partial tip of a meg was found in the Chiba prefecture of Japan! Acquiring this, even just a fragment was a real pain in the butt as megs from Japan are extremely scare. 2) Even though its not a Meg of course but still being the closest ancestor, this 3.1inch chubutensis tooth was found at a land site in Lecce, Italy with gorgeous color! 3) This tooth measuring 4.1 inches came from new site in Bangkalan City, Java, Indonesia. A majority of the megs here were found with absolutely terrible preservation so this one is one of the best out of the bunch! A few more pics of these teeth can be found on their posts on my page at https://www.instagram.com/nyislandfossils/ if its ok to post this here.
  25. Meglodon tooth origin?

    Hello all! Hope everyone's years are off to a happy and huntfull start! Well I started the year off spending some Christmas cash on a meglodon tooth. (Having only found fragments myself) any way I was wondering if there is a tie between locations and colors of teeth. I found this beauty at an pass-proof price. It is a beautiful orange/red. At 5 inches almost exactly. The previous owner says it came from the st. Mary's river area of Georgia. (Pretty close to where I was when I got it). I am just curious if this is a common color for other areas or even in the st Mary's area? Thank you all for any input.
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