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Found 528 results

  1. I’m Located in Savannah, GA but take day trips to Summerville, SC often. We find very good teeth here in Savannah including Megs at our more secret islands on the banks. I usually go with my wife and son but I wanted to find better spots in Summerville to take my kid instead of taking the boat to the islands. Would anybody want to swap spots with me? I would take you on the boat to the islands we hunt from if I can get some inside where to go in summerville.
  2. Hi, I'm seeking info. I found this about 15 kilometers inland from the Sea of Cortez and 15 kilometers south of Los Barriles, Baja Sur, Mexico. It was on a steep hillside above a small sandy wash or arroyo which will later flow into another and then the Sea, maybe 75 meters elevation. The person who took me to this gully said he has found Megalodon teeth here. It literally looks like a one kilo stack of tortillas, same size, dimension and layering. It's about 20 centimeters in diameter and 5 centimeters tall. I have found whale discs before but only on fresh skeletons and this does look similar but perhaps it's just a sedimentary deposit. I also found what appeared to be a rib about one meter in length but broken into about 8 pieces along with a few other pieces that didn't look like they belonged. I'm not sure about the geology. Appeared be banded horizontal layers with a surprising amount of some type of crystal that looked like selenite or calcite.
  3. Possible Megalodon Chunk?

    Hi! I’m an amateur fossil hunter from the southern coast of GA. While on a dredged Island, I encountered a fragment of something. I believe this could be a carchorodon megalodon tooth fragment because of it’s smooth “enamel”, sandy texture, and thinkness. Dozens of megalodon teeth have been found in this area. Thoughts? This would help a lot!
  4. 2012 Meet-up 2013 Meet-up 2014 Meet-up 2015 Meet-up 2016 Meet-up 2017 Meet-up 1 2017 Meet-up 2 2018 Meet-up The Singapore Fossils Collector recently had a Chinese New Year meet-up at the house of Han Yang, our top collector here. Here's some pics to showcase his stuff.
  5. my collection

    Some of my favorite fossils. I start with my new nearly 30cm big keichousarus.
  6. Is this a megalodon tooth?

    Hello, I apologise but i am quite new to fossils. I found this today at Walton-on-the-Naze in England, in the sand below the cliffs, and i wondered if anybody could help me confirm whether it is a megalodon tooth? It seems very different to the ones i have seen online, so i am not sure - but i understand teeth come in all shapes and sizes. I will be very happy if it is, especially because it was still quite high tide when i went and i had to wade through water to get to the beach (getting my feet soaked in freezing sea water in the process! ). Thank you
  7. Finding Northern Megalodon teeth

    I'm new to fossil hunting. I would love to find a Megalodon tooth. How far north did they range? I'm landlocked in Pennsylvania and frequent Nj & Maryland beaches in the summer. How far north can you find Meg teeth? What states seem best to plan a vacation for one? What type of area is best to search for one, open beach or where there's a cut bank....ect. Thank you.
  8. Slow evolution with loss of cusplets described in paper out of Calvert Museum. Gradual transition seen over millions of years. https://m.phys.org/news/2019-03-megalodon-teeth-evolved-ultimate-tools.html
  9. Hey TFF Members! Here's the second video of 2 days of fossil hunting that Cris and I did when it was a high of around 85/86 both days.... in February?! Florida is strange, but I love this so much compared to the weather where I was born up in Michigan. It's nice to be able to enjoy the outdoors comfortably all year! This was an extremely fun trip, other than the fact CRIS FOUND ALL THE GOOD MEGALODON TEETH! Hahaha. I still found some cool stuff, so I guess it's okay Hope you all can watch it when you get a chance!
  10. C. megalodon

    So, I can't get myself to spend the kind of money necessary for a complete, large, megalodon tooth. I'd rather spend that kind of money on other fossils in the rare instance that I actually purchase fossils. I have found some beautiful, complete megs personally, but none bigger than a couple inches. There is a store that I discovered down in Indiana that I call the "Wiccan Store" that has all kinds of beads, incense, crystals, and odd ball assemblages of things. I went into it years ago just to see what was in there and discovered that, way in the back, they have a little room devoted to rocks, fossils, and minerals. They used to have a big bin of broken megs averaging about $8 each for the big ones (now all they have are tiny ones in comparison). At any rate, I bought a huge broken tooth - 6-inches (15 cm) - for $8. I want to put a monster tooth on display. But I want the full effect of size that a complete one offers. So here was my solution (as usual, I forgot to take a true "before" photo, but the photos I did take, early, are sufficient). Here is how it started - the broken tooth with the beginning of the build-up of palaeosculp. I add no more than about an inch at a time and then let it set-up before adding more. It gets too difficult to form when in large globs. The basic form is complete and I'm beginning to add texture here. Here is the mostly complete restoration. It was not my intent to restore it like it just fell out of the mouth of the shark, but rather restore it to how it likely looked in the geologic context prior to breaking in half. Painting is by far the most difficult step. Matching any one color on the tooth takes as many as 5 or so separate colors and careful mixing to match. It's not perfect, and I may still work a bit on the texture of the root in spots, but I'm reasonably happy with it. I showed it around and no one noticed it was restored until I told them, so that's good enough for me for display purposes. Apologies to the sharktooth experts if there are any morphological gaffs. @Nimravis @Darktooth @Tidgy's Dad @Bobby Rico @Cowboy Paleontologist
  11. Hey TFF members! Some friends visited us from out of state and we had a great time showing them the amazing fossils that Florida has to offer. They also got to experience our whacky winters with it being 85 degrees in February! I was born in a Michigan... I'm not complaining! We found some awesome stuff though, so I hope you can give the video a watch when you have some time. This was such a fun one!
  12. I have some megalodon teeth that are prime candidates for being “diamond polished”. I just don’t know what tools to use. Or if I need a certain polish. I just have no idea. Also how to add graphite into the teeth to polish. I think that’s really cool too. If anyone has any advice it will be greatly appreciated. Thanks
  13. Megalodon or Chubutensis?

    Hello again everyone. I have missed posting on here. Many of you know that I found what I was told was either a small posterior meg or mako tooth last year. I just wanted to say that after further research, I have concluded that it is indeed most likely a mako tooth. This was hard for me to be objective and make this observation because I wanted it to be a Megalodon tooth Anyway, I spent some time at the aurora fossil museum, and I haven’t done any Calvert cliff hunting lately. I found the bottom half of a meg/ chub and I was wondering if it is possible to conclude which it is? It is in the top middle row of all the meg/chub/angy/ fragments I found this year. You can see the posterior mako tooth below the megs. Thanks for the help. On a side note, a goal of mine pretty high on the bucket list is to find an intact meg, any size. I was wondering if there were any coastal NC/ VA natives that could help me on this endeavor? I would be willing to pay for a guided meg hunt, just pm for specifics. Thanks so much guys!
  14. Hi all, so here I am in quest to finally purchase a meg tooth. I am searching for a long time and now I have decided to get a set from 1inch to 6 inch (1each) for my collection. I just can't decide and pull the trigger that's why I am asking for help. I will like to hear your opinion before I make the purchase. Here is the set I am interested in, on smaller teeth I have decided already but the 6 inch there are some options still. The first is exactly 6 inch dark tooth second 6.24 inch and there is the last one 6.10 inch which I love as well. Any opinion and advice will be appreciated. Thanks
  15. Hey Everyone! This is the 3rd and final video we did with our buddy Bob from Canada. We hunted sharks teeth for 2 days and this was definitely the more productive of the two! We found a beautiful little juvenile Meg, a huge crocodile toe bone, and a bunch of beautiful teeth and other fossils. It was a great time and we can't wait for Bob to make it back down south!
  16. Hey all! This week my colleagues and I published a paper we spent most of the last decade sweating over. It is an exhaustive report of all known late Miocene-Pleistocene records of teeth of Otodus (aka Carcharocles) megalodon teeth from the west coast in an attempt to estimate the date at which O megalodon went extinct. Aside from some conspiracy theorists who will wait until they die and not see a live 'meg', we all know it's not living today as there is not a shred of positive evidence indicating its existence. We know it's around in the Miocene, and the early Pliocene. Did it survive into the Pleistocene? End of the Pliocene? or become extinct sometime earlier? These questions require serious thought because it has direct implications for whether or not O. megalodon went extinct at the same time as a bunch of weird marine mammals or if it was killed off by a supernova known to have occurred 2.6 Ma. An earlier study pooled fossil occurrences from around the globe and statistically reconstructed a mean extinction date of 2.5 Ma, with significant error (~3.6 Ma to 100ky in the future being the max and min extinction dates). We found that in the California record, reliable occurrences are only found in early Pliocene rocks. All examples of late Pliocene or Pleistocene teeth were either poorly dated, reworked from Miocene rocks, had poor provenance, or are completely missing (and never photographed) and therefore the identification cannot be confirmed. We thus predicted a 3.6 Ma extinction date. To test this, we re-analyzed the dataset published in 2014 but chucked a bunch of bad data and exhaustively re-researched the stratigraphy of each locality and corrected about 3/4 of the dates in the remaining dataset, and added our new California records. When we analyzed this corrected dataset, our margin of error (the time between the max and min extinction dates) shrank from 3.6 million year long interval to 900,000 years; *probably* extinct by 3.6 Ma (mean extinction date), definitely by 3.2 Ma (min extinction date), and possibly as early as 4.1 Ma (max extinction date). This extinction therefore precedes the 2.6 Ma supernova, as well as the Plio-Pleistocene marine mammal extinction (which in all likelihood was not a mass extinction or an extinction event, rather just a period of higher extinction/origination rate). About 4 Ma is when fully serrated Carcharodon carcharias teeth show up in the North Atlantic, indicating when the two overlapped, however briefly. We think this biotic event matches best - the mechanics of exactly how this was driven are to be figured out by someone else, but perhaps adult Carcharodon outcompeted juvenile O/C megalodon prior to becoming gigantic. Some analyses of Otodus lineage growth rate is going to be necessary. Here's the open access paper here: https://peerj.com/articles/6088/ Here's a blog writeup I did for PeerJ here: https://peerj.com/blog/post/115284881293/early-pliocene-extinction-of-the-mega-toothed-shark-otodus-megalodon-boessenecker/ Excellent summary in Nat Geo: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2019/02/megalodon-extinct-great-white-shark/ CNN: https://www.cnn.com/2019/02/14/us/megalodon-extinct-earlier-scli-intl/index.html Fox News: https://www.foxnews.com/science/megalodon-shocker-huge-killer-shark-may-have-been-wiped-out-by-great-whites Forbes: https://www.forbes.com/sites/melissacristinamarquez/2019/02/14/great-white-sharks-may-be-the-reason-why-giant-megalodon-shark-is-extinct/#6a06986a6486 Daily Mail: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6700495/Giant-50-foot-long-predatory-shark-went-extinct-one-million-years-earlier-previously-thought.html
  17. Hey TFF Members! If you saw the last video I shared, we took our buddy Bob from Canada out Echinoid hunting in Yankeetown recently. He was in town for a few days so we also had a chance to take him shark tooth hunting! We didn't find anything huge, but we found a lot of really great fossils. The teeth here are very colorful and there are a lot of them. Of course, this video isn't lacking in Cris and I's strange shenanigans Even though we didn't find anything insane, it was an amazing day spent with great people, and we found tons of cool fossils. This beats a day at the office any day! Give it a watch if you are interested and have some time
  18. Great White Shark Possibly Killed off Megalodon

    Featuring @boess as lead author, no less! https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2019/02/14/us/megalodon-extinct-earlier-scli-intl/index.html
  19. Our own Robert Boessenecker authored a recently released paper that suggests that Megalodon died out due to competition from the smaller Great White Shark. “The Early Pliocene extinction of the mega-toothed shark Otodus megalodon: a view from the eastern North Pacific” by Robert Boessenecker et al. from PeerJ https://www-m.cnn.com/2019/02/14/us/megalodon-extinct-earlier-scli-intl/index.html?r=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cnn.com%2F Full text article here: https://peerj.com/articles/6088/
  20. Anyone seen the new paper on the possible causes of megalodon extinction? Haven't had a chance to read more than the abstract yet, but looks interesting: https://peerj.com/articles/6088/ @Gizmo
  21. Our final stop in the Shark program is of course the giant Sharks of the Miocene. We wrap our adventure through the timeline of shark evolution by giving the kids what they expect to see, big shark teeth. Truthfully, we do not have many large shark teeth. I went for interesting teeth not big teeth but we have a few that will grab the kids attention. We give a very brief introduction to the giant sharks with a 2 inch Otodus tooth. We can spend too much time on Otodus or the ancestors of Megalodon as it just do not have time ( plus we do not have teeth from Auriculatus, Angustidens, or Chubutensis). After that brief bit, we ask the kids a question.... What shark is the ancestor of the modern Great White ? We give the kids a chance to answer that question for themselves by connecting them to the sharks that swimming in the ocean off the coast of California 12 million years. I want to explore the origins of the most well known modern shark and connect them to the fossil rich area just 6 or so hours south of where they live so we journey to Sharktooth Hill to finish the program. Isurus planus was a fairly large shark and probably reached lengths of over 20 feet. I have not found a lot of material about planus but I would think that based on tooth size, 20 feet seems possible. I have seen 2 inch planus teeth though I have nothing that big myself. We also show the kids a couple Isurus desori teeth only to mention that they MIGHT be related to modern Short-fin Makos. We then jump into another species that is present at STH and the one the kiddos will be most familiar with, Megalodon. This is obviously a super important species to talk about because it is the most popular prehistoric shark. It is the T-rex of sharks. Biggest teeth of any shark found so far. Most likely the largest shark ever and quite possibly the largest fish. They ate whales. They were also common and the apex predator in the worlds oceans during their time. We do not know what they look like but my son is working on his version of Megalodon and it has elements of a basking shark to it along with the traditional Great White like appearance. I will tell the kids that for a long time, Megalodon was thought to be the ancestor of great whites but science has uncovered another possible contender for being the ancestor of great whites. Carcharodon hastalis was a large shark that probably reached 30 feet in length. They had large teeth and were probably fast swimming ambush predators. I remember reading somewhere, that evidence existed from STH that the Broad-tooth White Shark hunted early pinnipeds from underneath, just as modern white sharks do. I can not remember where I read that and I want to track that down again to verify before saying that to kids. Anyway, we explain that they were probably very similar in appearance to great whites and filled a similar ecological role. I will add that transitional teeth have been found that are a pretty conclusive link the chain of white shark evolution but we want them to check out the teeth and judge for themselves. Our presentation teeth Pic 1 I. planus and I. desori. These are not the exact teeth for program. I do have a few bigger teeth but these were in my desk as I am doing this lol Pic 2 Our 5.08 inch Megalodon tooth and the tooth that I suspect will be the most popular in the presentation. Not the prettiest nor the biggest but it is still a really big tooth to me. We also use a 3 inch tooth for the presentation but I did not photograph it. Pic 3 a 2 inch hastalis, a 2.5 inch hastalis, and one that I personally think is cooler than even Megalodon, a 2.54 inch Great White. It is blue. It just looks cool and I think 2.54 is pretty large for a white shark tooth. We wrap it up with questions from the kids while we go around the classroom handing out shark teeth to the students. If you happened to read all of these, you are a good soul because these are long winded posts I know lol Thank you to all who commented and offered encouragement. I will probably start putting up the marine mammal stuff next.
  22. Megalodon or Chubutensis?

    Hello everyone, If you saw my most recent trip report, you know that I just found my first meg tooth! However, I'm not entirely sure whether the tooth is from Carcharocles megalodon or Carcharocles chubutensis. The tooth was found at Bayfront Park/Brownies Beach, which is the northernmost part of the Calvert Cliffs. The sediments exposed in the cliffs here are from the Calvert Formation, roughly 18-22 million years old. This would be right around the time when the great Megalodon first emerged. I remember reading that the majority of megateeth found at Brownies are chubs, but that megs have also been found there. What I'd like to know is which one my tooth is: Meg or Chub? It looks to me like if the tooth were complete, it would have the defining residual cusps of chubutensis, but unfortunately the blade is broken on both sides right by the root. The bourlette is missing, but that is a characteristic of every shark in the mega lineage so that doesn't really matter. The tooth is approximately 1 3/4 inches, and not quite as thick as I would've expected. As you can see on my trip report and Hop 5 post, my current ID for this tooth is C. chubutensis, but that is subject to change should someone with better knowledge on megatooth identification give their opinion. One last possibility is that it may be a transitional meg, meaning the shark was a blurred line between megalodon and chubutensis. Any input is appreciated. Thanks!
  23. Hop 5 01/25/19

    (I will now be using the poll format, so you can actually click your favorite and the poll will keep track of the votes) 1. Carcharocles chubutensis: MY FIRST MEGATOOTH! A bit of damage near the root and a missing bourlette, but a gorgeous tooth nonetheless. The serrations are absolutely killer. It’s about 1 ¾ inches. Colors completely changed when it dried. I. Am. Ecstatic. 2. Carcharias cuspidata: Very large sand tiger with a beautiful hooked double cusp on one shoulder. Excellent preservation, and certainly a necklace quality tooth. 3. Notorynchus primigenius: A perfect little cow shark tooth. Found in the cove within my first five minutes of collecting. Not very big, but in fantastic condition. 4. Isurus desori: Incredible little mako. It is absolutely pristine, and still sharp enough to cut you. Has that beautiful Brownies blue coloration on the enamel. 5. Carcharocles sp.: Oh, what could have been...this is the tip to what was probably a huge Megalodon tooth. Based on the thickness of the tooth, it would have been much larger than the meg that I found. Still a great find! The tip of a monster.
  24. After just over a year of fossil collecting, I have finally found my first Meg! On Thursday, the first semester of my senior year came to an end. The next day, Friday, school was closed for a teacher work day. I figured I'd make the most of my day off by heading out to Bayfront Park. What better way to celebrate making it through the first half of senior year? I though that because it was a Friday, and rather cold, not many people would be out on the beach because they'd either be at school, work, or home because of the weather. I was right. When I arrived at a little before noon, there were only a few cars in the parking lot, and not all of them were fellow hunters. I slipped on my waders and made my way down the path, shovel and sifter in hand. Funny enough, I never actually sifted a single screen, because I didn't need to. I had no idea the tide was going to be as low as it was. But boy, was it out there. Even with a few hours before peak low tide, the entire beach was exposed and the water was calm. I stopped briefly at the cove area that people so often underestimate, and within five minutes of stepping onto the beach found a perfect little cow shark tooth laying right out in the open. That's when I knew it was going to be a good day of hunting. The tide was probably the one of the lowest I've ever seen at Brownies, so I had plenty of ground to cover. Trying not to get ahead of myself, I made sure to still walk very slowly and scan over the ground thoroughly. After about an hour, I was walking down near the water on a part of the beach that is normally submerged when I stumbled across a large tooth, half buried in the sand. My heart stopped when I spotted it. It clearly had signs of a bourlette, so I immediately knew I was looking right at my first ever meg. I pulled out my phone and began recording. I prayed that it would be whole as I carefully pried it out of the sand. To my delight, it was mostly complete, with flawless serrations and an intact tip. It had a bit of damage and it was missing the actual bourlette (must've fallen off), but I didn't mind one bit. I cleaned it off and spent marveled at the amazing tooth I had just found. I couldn't believe what was happening. After calling my friends and family and sending them the video, I carefully wrapped the tooth in tissue paper and aluminum foil to insure that it would make it home safely. There was no way I was throwing that tooth in my waders pouch like I do with the rest! I would have been more than happy if I hadn't found a single other tooth that day, but that was not the case. I continued south, and kept looking towards the water, hoping for some other nice finds. I found a fair share of decent makos, and another large but beaten up cow shark tooth. I eventually ran into a man named Scott who was hunting for the first time ever, and he showed me his backpack full of cetacean verts, including a very large whale vert. He told me he had been there since before sunrise, and hadn't had much luck with teeth, but clearly was finding verts left and right. I of course answered his question, "Any luck?" with a prompt "Oh yes, I hit the jackpot today." He congratulated me on my first meg, and we talked for a while more. He was a really cool guy, and I enjoyed helping him identify some finds and learn more about the cliffs. After my exchange with Scott, I went farther down the beach, finding more decent teeth and a few verts. At one point, I saw what was clearly another megatooth in the sand, and held my breath as I unearthed it. Unfortunately, it was only the tip of what was most likely a very large tooth. A true heartbreaker, but with everything else I had already found I couldn't complain. As the tide began to come in, I decided to head back to the entrance and make my way home. I caught up to Scott again, and we talked about my plans to become a paleontologist as we walked back up to our cars. I can say with some confidence that this was my best Brownies Beach trip ever, and perhaps even my best trip ever, period. I ended up finding a meg (although it's technically a C. chubutensis I believe), some very nice makos, a few complete cow shark teeth, hemis, sand tigers, a lot of tigers, a ray barb/spine, and a lot of fish and shark verts. I honestly don't think I could be much happier with my finds, and I am beyond thrilled to add my first megatooth to my collection! As far as a public site like Brownies goes, this is considered an extremely productive day, especially considering I only really hunted for about four hours, compared to my usual 6-7+. 2019 is certainly off to an amazing start; this is only my second hunt of the year! Thank you so much for reading my report, and here's to many more megs in the future! Here's a link to my YouTube video of finding the tooth. I will eventually be making full length videos of my hunts in the future, so please subscribe to the channel if you like! Thank you all. Also be sure to check out the Hop 5 post that will be up soon, and cast your vote for the tripmaker. Hoppe Hunting!
  25. Shark Teeth to identify

    We found these teeth in Malta where fossils are quite rare. This is my first find so its quite exiting to know what they are. After some research I have a feeling they are Megalodon but I would like someone to confirm my conclusion. I am able to post some more pics if required. Thanks in advance Jezz
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