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Found 91 results

  1. avian ethology:nesting behaviour

    dykescolarocoiserrnal.pone.0061030.PDF (about 2,7 MB) Mariela S.Fernandes, Rodolfo S.Garcia, Lucas Fiorelli, Alejandro Scolaro, Rodrigo B.Salvador, Carlos N.Cotaro , Gary W.Kaiser, Gareth Dyke: A large accumulation of Avian eggs from the late Cretaceous of Patagonia(Argentina)reveals a novel nesting strategy in Mesozoic birds Plos ONE 8 (4) e61030.doi 10371/journal.pone 0061030 https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0061030
  2. predatory fish investigation

    Among the first things I ever posted here were miscellanous items on Saurichthys. Here's one more: bio.014720.full.pdf(about 1,8 Mb) The invisible fish: hydrodynamic constraints for predator-preyinteraction in fossil fish Saurichthys compared to recent actinopterygians Ilja Kogan1,2,*, Steffen Pacholak3,4,*, Martin Licht1,‡, Jö rg W. Schneider1,2, Christoph Brücker3 and Sebastian Brandt5 an outtake:
  3. old beetles record

    this being: Whirling in the late Permian: ancestral Gyrinidae show early radiation of beetles before Permian-Triassic mass extinction Evgeny V. Yan,1,2 Rolf G. Beutel,1 and John F. Lawrence3 BMC Evol Biol. 2018; 18: 33. Published online 2018 Mar 16. doi: 10.1186/s12862-018-1139-8 1,63 MB yanbeutelcoleopterentomollagersts12869-8.pdf
  4. Eusuchian taphonomy

    isisfordia Cite this article: Syme CE, Salisbury SW. 2018 Taphonomy of Isisfordia duncani specimens from the Lower Cretaceous (upper Albian) portion of the Winton Formation, Isisford, central-west Queensland. R. Soc. open sci. 5: 171651. http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsos.171651 Recommended!
  5. Osteology of Ouranosaurus nigerensis

    This takes some time to download!!!!* 114 Mb,approximately Cite this as Bertozzo F, Dalla Vecchia FM, Fabbri M. (2017) The Venice specimen of Ouranosaurus nigeriensis (Dinosauria, Ornithopoda) PeerJ 5:e3403https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.3403 As Taquet didn't formally describe the species, this is a significant advance in our knowledge of the species. Note: This can be called a monograph due to its length. Audience: all dinosaur lovers, but please note that this IS a "technical" paper. Pretty good depiction of pelvic parts and manus. Cladogram warning! EDIT: I don't know my exact connection speed, but don't be surprised if it takes a couple of minutes.
  6. In the current (July-August 2018) issue of American Scientist magazine there's an article on champsosaurs. Anyone who's collected Late Cretaceous fossils in Montana, the Dakotas, Wyoming, or southern Canada has probably found a few. You tend to get just a paragraph or two about the group in mainstream science articles about animals that survived the K/T extinctions but there's a whole article about them. Check out your local Barnes & Noble if you don't have online access.
  7. L.S., As you can probably tell from the title of this topic, I am looking for information on the lithostratigraphy of the Mesozoic of Madagascar. Specifically, I would like to have an up-to-date overview of the terrestrial formations that occur on the island. Can anyone recommend me a good resource, say a recent review paper? Based on bits and bobs I read in more recent papers, it appears that the stratigraphy book I have now (Besairie and Collignon 1971, Géologie de Madagascar: Las terrains sédimentaires) is somewhat outdated... Thanks for your help! Tim
  8. Armed with information courtesy of @FossilDAWG , I've headed to Montgomery, Alabama to get my first taste of Cretaceous fauna from 85-80 MYA (Santonian and Campanian stages). After booking a hotel in close proximity to the creek and (restlessly) sleeping the night away, We ate breakfast, got our boots on and eagerly drove to the site with the help of a GPS. When we arrived, the GPS signal was showing us miles off from where we actually were, so Google was shelved and Papa and I started the flurry of pictures. As per description, the entrance to the site itself was kind of jagged, made of huge concrete slabs left there from a time long forgotten. After we got down this man-made hill, I took a moment to take in the sight, the outcrop plainly in view: We slowly sloshed through the creek, being careful not to slip on rocks or step into deeper-than-you-think holes in the stream bed. Once we got to the outcrop on the far side, we got right to looking. Barely even 5 steps in, I instantly recognized the blade of a shark tooth that was sticking out of the sand. It has little root on it, though I can tell that it is probably a sand tiger. It is the only one I've found, so far. Venturing further in, we started finding Oysters. Lots of them. It wasn't long before we found what was apparently the main bed they came from: To sum it up; Bivalves. Bivalves everywhere. You almost can't walk there without stepping on pieces of them they're so abundant. With everything there, it didn't take very long to get a decent haul, with pieces of ammonites, two echinoids and a lone gastropod being added to the seemingly limitless supply of bivalves. I was quite tempted to get back in the creek and have another go at it, but Papa balked, citing the heat which was in the 90's, and since he was the driver he had all the decision-making power. I came away with 4 specific favourites, the gastropod, the 2 echies, and one particularly complete valve (the name of which eludes me, as I am by no means an expert in bivalves). The right-most echie's top side is covered in River crud, though as I found it practically in the water. Cleaning tips, anyone? Do keep posted, as I will make 3 return trips, when temps aren't in the 90's.
  9. I wanted to share some of my projects with all of you. A hobby and side business of mine is creating dinosaur sculptures. I do all different kinds of things aside from dinos too, but to keep it relevant, we’ll stick to the mesozoic Featured in my profile picture is my raptor created from scrap metal used to construct railings. I named him Bambi (ironically not a Bambiraptor). Probably more like Deinonychus, he’s a pretty big chicken, but you let me know what you think. As of now he’s my favorite creation, hence why he’s featured in my profile pic. Still trying to figure out the paint job. I wish he’d stop scaring all the birds and deer away...
  10. Fossil or Just Another Rock?

    Hello everyone I have here a specimen and can’t figure out if it’s just a plain ol’rock but I think it might not be a rock at all. This specimen weighs almost 5lbs it’s original location was found in Carrizo Springs Texas at a drilling rig location. Some helpful info and opinions about what this specimen could be would really be great -Thanks y’all!
  11. Hello all, In juli I go to the south of France for 2-3 weeks. We go every year to a different place. Now I want to ask if there are good hunting spots over there that are free accessible? I would prefer to find some vertebra fossils but I know that might be hard. Inverts are also fine. Anyone here that can help with tips or locations? I never found fossils in the south before but I know they are there. We don't go to the West/South coast because there are too many tourists over there. Thanks in advance. Greetings
  12. NICE!!http://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article/file?id=10.1371/journal.pbio.2001663&type=printable 51 Mb,highly recommended, first description of a new species,Alcione. A cladistic analysis is included,BTW. Very ,very solid documentation of the material
  13. Texas, a short while back

    I liked the uncluttered format of this pic,decided to post it
  14. dagrimaldiCretacTropiclLizard2016.pdf HIGHLY recommended*,for reasons that will become immediately obvious Less than 2,0 Mb *the why of it: 1)simple esthetics(extremely pleasing(I think)photographic coverage) 2)the style of preservation,with concurrent implications for,e.g.phylogeny) below:the least interesting illustration
  15. It was in the cards

    What a fitting tribute!!!!!!!! requiescat in pace,Ian (4,2 Mb) related:
  16. Petrified Wood?

    Not sure if this is petrified wood or a concretion due to the dark center on one side. I could use some clarification and input.
  17. Fossil or inorganic

    I've been told this could be something, fossil or inorganic. It was found in the same Mesozoic area as previous finds in the Big Sky, MT area. Just looking for some input pertaining to what it could be whether it's a rock or something more......
  18. Heteromorph, right side view

    From the album james herrmann

    In this right side view of the sculpture I would like to show the green marble base. I chose this mottled green marble as a continuation of the kelp forest theme. I envision this ammonite pulling its way along the waving fronts of a kelp forest as it forages for small crustaceans. Kelp forests are contrasts of warm, bright beams of light and deep shadow. The marble is mottled in various shades of green much like looking down onto the kelp forest's waving fronds.
  19. Heteromorph, front view

    From the album james herrmann

    In this view I again wanted to show the cantilevered structure of the sculpture and the subtle color differences in the patination of the shell vs the body of the ammonite.
  20. Heteromorphic Ammonite Left Front View

    From the album james herrmann

    In this front left view I wanted to highlight the waving of the kelp. The challenge was to strongly support the heteromorph while still making the sculpture feel like there was movement and a lightness to the work.
  21. Heteromorphic Ammonite Left Side View

    From the album james herrmann

    This left side view of the sculpture shows the attachment of the ammonite to the kelp, actually there is a lot of bronze in the mass of tentacles. From the base to the top of the sculpture is approximately 40 inches.
  22. Heteromorph Sculpture Left Rear View

    From the album james herrmann

    I like the complex repeating nature of the spines in this view of the sculpture. I am supporting the mass of the bronze ammonite with the bronze kelp leaves welded into a trellis-like pattern to carry the weight down to the base.
  23. My New Heteromorph Sculpture

    From the album james herrmann

    Heteromorph is my most recent sculpture with a paleontological theme. This is the rear view of the sculpture showing the shell spines.
  24. The paleobiology of a winged reptile

    wankelhamiptchina.full.pdf 2,3 Mb Recommended, and then some
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