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Found 119 results

  1. Hello everyone, I have decided a while ago that I would focus on collecting Paleozoic material, because of this there are quite a few fossils I have that I purchased a long time ago and do not have an interest in keeping, these guys are not that special and I am not looking for much of anyone even does want to trade with me, but I do prefer Paleozoic material. I will post what I have here. 1.Lebanese shrimp fossil Cretaceous GONE/TRADED 2. Geocoma carinata I believe from the Solnhofen 3. Chunkosaurus 4.some cretaceous teeth, spinosaurus, Squalicorax, scapanorynchus, enchodus 5. Some gastropods 6.otodus obliquus Morocco eocene
  2. I recently saw a wonderful diagram showing the fossil ranges of various scleractinian coral architectures, or at least the ranges of genera typical of those architectures. But now I can't seems to find it again... The diagram included images of the various coral growth forms and was simpler than but otherwise similar to this: If anyone knows where I might have seen such a diagram, please post the url here -- thanks!
  3. Hi I was just at my aunts house and in her house I found a ammonite I asked her where it was from and she said she got it in Cuba which made me wonder what creatures lived in Cuba in the Mesozoic I found out In the Jurassic there where Pliesiosaurs, Ichthyosaurs and ammonites and lots of pterosaurs also there has been some dinosaurs too which surprised me because I thought Cuba was under water there’s a few remains of sauropods a Camarasaur and a Diplodocus like sauropod some more fragmented Sauropod bones and some bones of a unknown Saurischian also some unknown reptile bones have been found too I hope this helps with the Mesozoic creatures of Cuba this is my first informational post Thanks!!
  4. A couple of weeks ago, I was in Barnes & Noble bookstore and spotted this book in the science section. It's too close to Christmas to get it for myself but I was content to look through it there. I was familiar with the artwork of Jay Matternes (and I'd seen the cover of the book two months before it was published in October) from various publications especially a small souvenir booklet I bought at the visitor center at Agate Fossil Beds National Monument back in the 90's. In that little book there are mini versions of murals he painted for the halls of the Smithsonian along with reconstructions to show the skeleton, musculature, and body exterior based on fossils and modern animal comparisons. It's beautiful work. In "Visions of Lost Worlds" I saw the same kind of artwork and reconstructions but this new book also has preliminary sketches to show his process from idea to finished work. If I don't get it from Santa, I'm going to get it and eventually write a review for the forum (although maybe I just did). I already love this book. Jess
  5. cretaceous,USA,Pisces

    A new large Late Cretaceous lamniform shark from North America, with comments on the taxonomy, paleoecology, and evolution of the genus Cretodus Kenshu Shimada &Michael J. Everhart Article: e1673399 | Received 30 Nov 2018, Accepted 09 Sep 2019, Published online: 18 Nov 2019 LINK (description of Cretodus houghtonorum n.sp) edit:5,30 MB,or thereabouts relevant: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Containing Papers of a Biological Character Vol. 210 (1921), pp. 311-407 V I I I .— On the Calcification o f the Vertebral Centra in Sharks and Rays. B y W . G. R id e w o o d, D.Sc. 18 MB!!
  6. I have been asked this question many times. The non avian Dinosaurs died out the the end of the Mesozoic but many other animal groups survived. Among them were the Crocodilians. And people ask me all the time how they survived while the Dinosaurs didn't. So this has inspired me to make my first video on my dedicated Paleontology channel, Paleo Analysis. I am making these videos for the purpose of education so feel free to share this video as well as future videos! https://youtu.be/Gan8Vu4oM0w
  7. Need help

    so i went to Orlando Science Center today for the Dino Digs exhibition but in Jurassic Ridge dig pit area i know that there is a Camptosaurus, Camarasaurus, Ceratosaurus and a Stegosaurus, but there is some species and genus of dinosaurs and other animals that i dont know what there like take for example the turtle shell, the alligator crocodile like animal fossil, the ankylosaur like fossil and that bone that i dont know what species does it belong to and that nest that i don't know which dinosaur does it belong to.
  8. Hey Everyone - I hope someone can provide some insight and help me identify this fossil. I would really appreciate it! I found this strange looking tooth (at least I think it is) a few years ago in San Antonio, Texas. It feels and looks like a rock as far as texture goes but it's shaped very similar to an animal tooth. I've attached photos for reference and labeled each one: Front Back Side Front Height - 5 inches (12.7 centimeters) Front Width - 4.5 inches (11.43 centimeters) I've also attached a Geology Map of Texas which outlines where rocks of various geologic ages are visible on the surface of Texas today. On the map, I circled in yellow the location of where San Antonio, Texas is for reference. Hopefully it can provide more insight for you. I'm not even close to a geology expert but limestone is very prominent in San Antonio. The city is also home to The Edwards Aquifer which may or may not be useful. I'd be happy to answer any questions and I can also take additional pictures if needed. Looking forward to hearing back from you all!
  9. Help me ID this

    I found this near a river in La Matea (Jaen, Spain) the zone is predominantly mesozoic and the rock is limestone. I'm not sure if it's a fossil or some kind of formation. I have two similar specimen, is like a cylinder that goes from one side to the other of the rock, in one of the images I've partially removed some of the rock. Thank you.
  10. Found today on the English Yorkshire Coast ( Runswick bay). At first i thought it was maybe layers of a type of fossilised plant but I cant find anything to match the markings on this. Completely baffled by it. Looks very cool though. ID help, please?
  11. Egg? Dino park

    Found on flat ground by itself in Dinosaur Park, southern Alberta. Approximately 5 cm long, 3 wide, and 1.5 thick. I’m really curious as to what this one is. Ask if you need more details
  12. Found with Gryphaea ID Help

    Hi- I found this today at Lake Benbrook, Tarrant County Texas. I was looking for newly exposed large ammonoids. I believe that it is possibly from the Woodbine formation because I also found some nice Gryphaea- looks like maybe Parasmilia but it also looks like has a shell- 3.5 inches x 1 inch. Your expert help appreciated- Thanks-
  13. Dinosaur relatives

    Hey, a question I have always wanted to ask is about dinosaur relatives, more specifically what do we mean when we refer to two dinosaurs as cousins ? Do we mean that a kind of dinosaur(for example baryonyx ) lived in an environment but at one point a group got separated by land and this group got to live in another part of the world so that group resulted in adapting to another environment and becoming a different dinosaur (for example spinosaurus ) or do we mean that a dinosaur is an ancestor of another dinosaur (again for example baryonyx evolved into spinosaurus)? This may seem like a really basic question to ask but I haven't really been able to find an answer so if someone answered it would be great.
  14. I watched a show on PBS last night, "When Whales Walked: Journeys in Deep Time." I just happened to notice it on the guide about 45 minutes before it was on. It is actually about more than the evolution of whales, the group having four-footed Early Eocene ancestors. There is a long segment roughly twenty minutes long each on crocodilians, birds, whales, and elephants. I thought it was a good show overall with interviews of researchers I know from their technical articles ( Hans-Dieter Sues, Philip Gingerich, Emmanel Gheerbrant, Christian de Muizon). However, each segment was also a little light on content for the topic and one was especially unclear. The one on birds made it appear that Deinonychus was an ancestor of later birds. They should have showed a chart showing when it lived in the Cretaceous with Archaeopteryx and the Liaoning birds millions of years before. There was a quick view of a family tree that seemed to illustrate that but it went by in a second or two. The segment on whales showed a lot of footage of modern whales and some great background on the "first whale," Pakicetus, but it didn't show any of the whales described in the past twenty years. It just mentioned that there had been recent discoveries. I thought there should have been at least a quick look at Ambulocetus and a few of the increasingly more marine-adapted forms that lived before Basilosaurus. They pretty much jumped from Pakicetus to Basilosaurus to the divergence of toothed and baleen whales. I think they could have spent the two hours just on the whales just as the title of the show led me to believe. I liked the segment on elephants because just as I was expecting the show to skip the earliest known members of the group, they go to Morocco and then talk to Emmanuel Gheerbrant who described Phosphatherium, the first probiscidean, which is known from the same early Eocene phosphate layer as a lot of the shark teeth we see at shows are from. Other extinct forms were descussed as well. Here's a link that takes to an online notice and website: https://www.pbs.org/show/when-whales-walked-journeys-deep-time/ Jess
  15. fossil pregnant with implications

    LINK A GRAVID FOSSIL TURTLE FROM THE EARLY CRETACEOUS REVEALS A DIFFERENT EGG DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY TO THAT OF EXTANT MARINE TURTLES EDWIN-ALBERTO CADENA , MARY L. PARRA-RUGE, JUAN DE D. PARRA-RUGE and SANTIAGO PADILLA-BERNAL [Palaeontology, 2018, pp. 1–13] (slightly less than 6 MB a more popular capsule description of the find 2015-09-oldest-fossil-sea-turtle.pdf @MiseriKing @Tidgy's Dad
  16. Identifying layers of sediment

    Need some help identifying layers of fossil sediment along a steep cliff side, having a hard time distinguishing time zones. Thank you!
  17. until
    NORTH COAST FOSSIL CLUB APRIL MEETING Our main speaker will be Nathan Smith who is a volunteer in the Vertebrate Paleontology Department at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. The title of his talk will be "The Mesozoic Extinction". For this month's Collector's Corner you are invited to bring in your Mesozoic/Cretaceous Fossils for showing others and sharing information. The Public is Welcome!!!
  18. ID required please

    I found these two embedded in the same bit of shale on the yorkshire coastline near Kettleness. Im a complete beginner so sorry if they are just rocks. they are both a similar size, 6cm by 4cm (LxW)
  19. What is this?

    Hi everyone. This is my first request for an ID, I'm a complete newbie with limited knowledge but very eager to learn. This might be nothing, but I thought it was strange. Found loose on a Yorkshire beach (UK) unsure whether it was washed up by the sea or came away in a cliff fall. Area known for ammonites/Mesazoic/Jurassic finds. Measures approx 9cm in length, 18 cm circumference.
  20. microbial Utah

    Microbial deposits in the aftermath of the end-Permian mass extinction: A diverging case from the Mineral Mountains(Utah, USA) EMMANUELLE VENNIN, NICOLAS OLIVIER, ARNAUD BRAYARD, IVAN BOUR, CHRISTOPHE THOMAZO, GILLES ESCARGUEL, EMMANUEL FARA, KEVIN G. BYLUND, JAMES F. JENKS, DANIEL A. STEPHEN and RICHARD HOFMANN Sedimentology (2015)62, 753–792 NB 170 MB One more P/Tr article with "aftermath" Any more and I'll have conniptions And now for the serious part:this is seriously good. ..really Yes it's large,in both memory space and number of pages,but the subject merits exhaustive treatment. 11 out of ten for this one Mathematically impossible,you say? Hah!
  21. Fuchs_et_al_2015_PZ.pdf @TqB @belemniten @PFOOLEY @DPS Ammonite and perhaps a host of others? The list of authors read like a who's who of "paleomalacology" /RECOMMENDED!!!!!! ___________________________________________________________________________ A nearly complete respiratory, circulatory, and excretory system preserved in small Late Cretaceous octopods (Cephalopoda) from Lebanon Dirk Fuchs • Philipp R. Wilby • Sigurd von Boletzky • Pierre Abi-Saad • Helmut Keupp • Yasuhiro Iba Palaontol Z. DOI 10.1007/s12542-015-0256-6 ____________________________________________________________________________________________________
  22. Triassic cephalopoda

    GUE SPATHIAN (LOWER TRIASSIC) AMMONOIDS FROM WESTERN USA (IDAHO, CALIFORNIA, UTAH AND NEVADA) Jean Guex Alexandre Hungerbühler James F. Jenks Luis O’Dogherty Viorel Atudorei David G. Taylor Hugo Bucher Annachiara Bartolini Mémoire de Géologie (Lausanne), n°49, 2010 about 16 MB the contributing authors are dyed-in-the-wool experts on the Triassic @andreas
  23. Who are you calling dimorphic

    Parent_1997-Geobios.pdf Ontogeny and Sexual dimorphism of Eurycephalites gottschei(Tornquist)(Ammonoidea) of the Andean Lower Callovian(Argentine-Chile) Geobios 30-3,30-6-1997 recommended? You bet!! Avoid if allergic to quantitative analytic data treatment
  24. Cretaceous crab pieces

    I believe these are parts from a crab I found in NJ, from what I see I think the large one is from the shoulder or bicep from a crab, is it possible to identify anything else about the animal?this side is fairly flat with the bottom edge protruding out.this side is round but in pretty bad condition.side view of the piece.
  25. Icthyosaur drawings

    Tried my hand at two different styles of drawing an icthyosaur. Don't exactly remember the species I was going for but I remember that it and the fish are both from the Jurassic. this one is a bit more realistic. and this is a cartoony representation.
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