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Found 27 results

  1. Archaeonycteris trigonodon Revilliod, 1917

    From the album Vertebrates

    Archaeonycteris trigonodon Revilliod, 1917 Middle Eocene Lutetian Messel near Darmstadt Hessia Germany As far as I know, four bat genera with a total of 8 species are known from Messel: Palaeochiropteryx tupaiodon and P. spiegeli, Archaeonycteris trigonodon and A. pollex, Trachypteron franzeni, Hassianycteris messelense, H. magna and Hassianycteris? revilliodi. The genus Palaeochiropteryx is the most common and smallest bat from Messel with a wingspan of around 26 to 29cm. Archaeonycteris is much rarer and somewhat larger - the wingspan is about 37cm. The largest bat in Messel is Hassianycteris magna with a wingspan of almost 50cm. Lit.: Revilliod, P. (1917): Fledermäuse aus der Braunkohle von Messel bei Darmstadt. Abhandlungen der Großherzoglichen Hessischen Geologischen Landesanstalt zu Darmstadt, 7 (2), 162-201. Richter, G. & Storch, G. (1980): Beiträge zur Ernährungsbiologie eozäner Fledermäuse aus der "Grube Messel". Natur und Museum, 110 (12), p. 353-367. Simmons, N.B. & Geisler, J.H.(1998): Phylogenetic relationships of Icaronycteris, Archaeonycteris, Hassianycteris and Palaeochiropteryx to extant bat lineages, with comments on the Evolution of echolocation and foraging strategies in Microchiroptera. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, 235: 1-182. Russel, D.E. & Sigé, B (1969): RÉVISION DES CHIROPTÈRES LUTÉTIENS DE MESSEL (HESSE, ALLEMAGNE). Palaeovertebrata, Montpellier, 1969, 3 : 63-182, 29 fig., 6 pl.
  2. Hey guys I came across this fossil on the internet. I dont think this is necessarily fake, but what are the chances this fossil has had some restoration or frabrication done?
  3. Eopelobates wagneri Weitzel, 1938

    From the album Vertebrates

    Eopelobates wagneri Weitzel, 1938 Middle Eocene Lutetian Messel near Darmstadt Hessia Germany
  4. From the album Vertebrates

    Palaeochiropteryx tupaiodon REVILLIOD, 1917 Middle Eocene Lutetian Messel near Darmstadt Germany
  5. A great new video from PBS Eons about the Messel Lagerstätte in Germany.
  6. Lit.: Smith, K. (2009) Eocene lizards of the clade Geiseltaliellus from Messel and Geiseltal, Germany, and the Early Radiation of Iguanidae (Reptilia: Squamata). Peabody Museum of Natural History Yale University Bulletin, 50(2), October 2009: 219-306.
  7. Lit.: Smith, J.D. Storch, G. (1981): New Middle Eocene bats from “Grube Messel” near Darmstadt, W-Germany. Senckenbergiana biologica, 61 (3/4): 153-167. Richter, G. & Storch, G. (1980): Beiträge zur Ernährungsbiologie eozäner Fledermäuse aus der "Grube Messel". Natur und Museum, 110 (12), p. 353-367
  8. Palaeoemys kehreri Staesche, 1928

    From the album Vertebrates

    Palaeoemys kehreri Staesche, 1928 Middle Eocene Lutetium Messel near Darmstadt Germany
  9. Cyclurus kehreri ANDREAE, 1893

    Cyclurus kehreri, originally assigned to the recent genus Amia, was placed in Cyclurus by Gaudant (1987). Lit.: GAUDANT J. 1999a. — Cyclurus kehreri (Andreae) : une espèce clé pour la connaissance des Amiidae (Poissons actinoptérygiens) du Paléogène européen. Courier Forschungsinstitut Senckenberg 216: 131-165. L. Grande and W. E. Bemis. 1998. A comprehensive phylogenetic study of amiid fishes (Amiidae) based on comparative skeletal anatomy. An empirical search for interconnected patterns of natural history. Society of Vertebrate Paleontology Memoir 4. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 18(1, suppl.):1-690
  10. Messelornis christata HESSE, 1989

    It is my pleasure to quote Auspex: "Messelornis is often incorrectly referred to as the "Messel Rail". Although rails are in the same order (Gruiformes, along with the cranes), its closest living relative is the Sunbittern of the American tropics. There are four named species (of two genera) in the family Messelornithidae: Messelornis cristata (only from Messel), M. nearctica (from the Eocene Green River Fm., USA), M. russelli (from the Paleocene of France), and Itardiornis hessae (from the Late Eocene-Early Oligocene fissure-fillings in Quercy, France). According to Gerald Meyer in Paleocene Fossil Birds, there are over 500 specimens of M. cristata known from the Messel pit, constituting roughly half of the bird fossils found there. Interestingly, no juvenile specimens are known from there, which suggests that they did not nest nearby." Would need some prepping - there is still a sand limonite layer on top of the bones. Lit.: Angelika Hesse (1988): Die Messelornithidae - eine neue Familie der Kranichartigen (Aves: Gruiformes: Rhynocheti) aus dem Tertiär Europas und Nordamerikas. In: Journal für Ornithologie, 129 (1): 83-95; Berlin. Angelika Hesse (1990): Die Beschreibung der Messelornithidae (Aves: Gruiformes: Rhynocheti) aus dem Alttertiär Europas und Nordamerikas. Senckenbergische Naturforschende Gesellschaft. ISBN 9783924500672 Gerald Mayr (2009): Paleogene Fossil Birds. Springer. ISBN 9783540896272 Michael MORLO (2004) Diet of Messelornis (Aves: Gruiformes), an Eocene bird from Germany. Cour. Forsch.-Inst. Senckenberg  252 pp 29 – 33
  11. Messelornis christata HESSE, 1989

    Here it is my pleasure to quote Auspex: "Messelornis is often incorrectly referred to as the "Messel Rail". Although rails are in the same order (Gruiformes, along with the cranes), its closest living relative is the Sunbittern of the American tropics. There are four named species (of two genera) in the family Messelornithidae: Messelornis cristata (only from Messel), M. nearctica (from the Eocene Green River Fm., USA), M. russelli (from the Paleocene of France), and Itardiornis hessae (from the Late Eocene-Early Oligocene fissure-fillings in Quercy, France). According to Gerald Meyer in Paleocene Fossil Birds, there are over 500 specimens of M. cristata known from the Messel pit, constituting roughly half of the bird fossils found there. Interestingly, no juvenile specimens are known from there, which suggests that they did not nest nearby." Lit.: Angelika Hesse (1988): Die Messelornithidae - eine neue Familie der Kranichartigen (Aves: Gruiformes: Rhynocheti) aus dem Tertiär Europas und Nordamerikas. In: Journal für Ornithologie, 129 (1): 83-95; Berlin. Angelika Hesse (1990): Die Beschreibung der Messelornithidae (Aves: Gruiformes: Rhynocheti) aus dem Alttertiär Europas und Nordamerikas. Senckenbergische Naturforschende Gesellschaft. ISBN 9783924500672 Gerald Mayr (2009): Paleogene Fossil Birds. Springer. ISBN 9783540896272
  12. Amphiperca multiformis WEITZEL, 1933

    Lit.: Weitzel, K. (1933b): Amphiperca multiformis n. g. n. sp. und Thaumaturus intermedius n. sp., Knochenfische aus dem Mittel-Eozän von Messel. Notizblatt des Vereins für Erdkunde und der Hessischen Geologischen Landesanstalt zu Darmstadt, (5) 14: 89-97.
  13. Thaumaturus intermedius Weitzel, 1933

    Lit.: Gaudant, J. Meunier, F.J. (2004) Un test pour déterminer la position systématique du genre Thaumaturus Reuss 1844 (poisson téléostéen): l'approche paléohistologique. Courier Forschungsinstitut Senckenberg, 252: 79-93. Weitzel, K. (1933b): Amphiperca multiformis n. g. n. sp. und Thaumaturus intermedius n. sp., Knochenfische aus dem Mittel-Eozän von Messel. Notizblatt des Vereins für Erdkunde und der Hessischen Geologischen Landesanstallt zu Darmstadt, (5) 14: 89-97. MICKLICH, N. (2012): An exceptional record of Thaumaturus intermedius WEITZEL, 1933 from Messel Pit. – Kaupia. Darmstadter Beitrage zur Naturkunde, 18: 11-17; Darmstadt.
  14. Lit.: J. Gaudant & N. Micklich (1990): Rhenanoperca minuta nov. gen., nov. sp., ein neuer Percoide (Pisces, Perciformes) aus der Messel-Formation (Mittel-Eozän, Unteres Geiseltalium). Paläontologische Zeitschrift 64(3):269-286. Fish eats fish: The diet of Rhenanoperca minuta mostly consisted of snails ("snailfish"), but not always!
  15. Palaeoperca proxima Micklich, 1978

    Lit.: Micklich, N. (1978): Palaeoperca proxima, ein neuer Knochenfisch aus dem Mittel-Eozän von Messel bei Darmstadt. Senckenbergiana lethaea, 59 (4/6), 483-501.
  16. Prepped by transfer method (Toombs, Harry; A.E. Rixon (1950). "The use of plastics in the "transfer method" of preparing fossils". The museums journal. 50: 105–107.) Palaeochiropteryx tupaiodon with preserved wing membrane and ears. Lit.: Revilliod, P. (1917): Fledermäuse aus der Braunkohle von Messel bei Darmstadt. Abhandlungen der Großherzoglichen Hessischen Geologischen Landesanstalt zu Darmstadt, 7 (2), 162-201. Richter, G. & Storch, G. (1980): Beiträge zur Ernährungsbiologie eozäner Fledermäuse aus der "Grube Messel". Natur und Museum, 110 (12), p. 353-367. Simmons, N.B. & Geisler, J.H.(1998): Phylogenetic relationships of Icaronycteris, Archaeonycteris, Hassianycteris and Palaeochiropteryx to extant bat lineages, with comments on the Evolution of echolocation and foraging strategies in Microchiroptera. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, 235: 1-182.
  17. Palaeopython sp.

    Palaeopython sp. together with a coprolite (containing several small fish vertebrae)
  18. Lit.: Harrassowitz, H.L.F. (1922): Die Schildkrötengattung Anosteira von Messel bei Darmstadt und ihre stammesgeschichtliche Bedeutung. Abhandlungen der Hessischen Geologischen Landesanstalt zu Darmstadt, 6 (3): 138-238.
  19. Messelirrisor non det.

    Prepped by transfer method. Mr. G. Mayr from Senckenberg Institute was so kind to determine the family: It's a Messelirrisor sp., a relative of the Hoopoe. with preserved plumage (can be best seen with backlight) Picture taken by Dûrzan cîrano, distributed by Wikimedia under GNU Free Documentation License Lit.: Mayr, G. (2000): Tiny hoopoe-like birds from the Middle Eocene of Messel (Germany). The Auk 117(4):964-970
  20. Prepped by transfer method. For about 30 years, I wasn't sure whether this juvenile crocodile is Diplocynodon darwini or Allognathosuchus haupti. Dr. Alex Hastings from the Virginia Museum of Natural History was so kind to determine it: "It looks to me like a young Diplocynodon darwini. I say D. darwini instead of D. deponiae mostly because of the general lack of osteoderms on the tail and legs. Allognathosuchus has more of a round snout/head, and even at this size would look more mature. The fenestrae at the back of the skull are still fairly oblong and the eyes are overly large, indicating a pretty young individual, maybe a year or two old. It looks a lot like several of the young D. darwini we had from Geiseltal, which overlaps in age and environment with Messel." Lit.: Rossmann, T. & Blume, M. (1999) Die Krokodilfauna der Grube Messel, Natur und Museum, Vol 129, p. 261-270. Hastings, A.K. and M. Hellmund (2015) Rare in situ preservation of adult crocodylian with eggs from the Middle Eocene of Geiseltal, Germany. Palaios, 30(6):446–461
  21. Lit.: Harrassowitz, H.L.F. (1922): Die Schildkrötengattung Anosteira von Messel bei Darmstadt und ihre stammesgeschichtliche Bedeutung. Abhandlungen der Hessischen Geologischen Landesanstalt zu Darmstadt, 6 (3): 138-238.
  22. Palaeochiropteryx spiegeli Revilliod 1917

    From the album Vertebrates

    Palaeochiropteryx spiegeli Revilliod 1917 Eocene Lutetian Messel near Darmstadt Germany
  23. Atractosteus messelensis Grande, 2010

    From the album Vertebrates

    Atractosteus messelensis Grande, 2010 (old name: Atractosteus strausi Kinkelin 1884) Eocene Lutetian Messel near Darmstadt Germany Length 22cm
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