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Found 6 results

  1. Kelowna Fish Fossil

    Hi all, Found this fish fossil in some slate in Kelowna. Not sure of the rock member yet, as I'm unfamiliar with Okanagan geology (besides the White Lake member). The fossil is close to a foot long, and was found along side fossils of Metasequoia occidentalis leaves as well as an unidentified deciduous branch. I imagine this is probably a fossil of Eosalmo driftwoodensis. The fossil has preserved a somewhat squished 3d rendering of the spinal/head material that is extremely fragile. Is it valuable to maintain, and if so how?
  2. Hello Fossil Forum! I recently purchased a metasequoia cone that is from the Huff, North Dakota area and the place I purchased it from has a tag claiming that it is 85 million years old. I believed it at first, but after some research I am unsure of its age. I have a Mesozoic collection going, so I’d like to know if it is late Cretaceous in age. Thank you!
  3. Mcabee Fossils

    First time posting here, thought i'd share a plate of Metasequoia that I found at the Macabee site near Cache Creek BC a number of years ago. More to follow if there's interest.
  4. METASEQUOIA DAWN REDWOOD 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    METASEQUOIA DAWN REDWOOD Muddy Creek Formation, Beaver Head County, Montana Oligocene Age (5 million years ago) The Dawn Redwood (Metasequoia) is a genus that dates all the way back to the age of dinosaur it is related to the California Redwoods and was thought to be extinct until living specimens were discovered in central China in 1944. First called a “fossil tree” because it was believed extinct, the fast-growing tree is now a favorite ornamental tree. It was (and is) a deciduous conifer. Today’s Metasequoia has a full pyramidal shape, grows to 120′ high. Dimensions: 2.6 Inches Long, 2.2 Inches Wide. Dawn redwoods are fast-growing trees. They will grow too large for small gardens, but can be good in a wide range of larger gardens and parks. Although they live in wet sites in their native habitat they will also tolerate dry soils. Kingdom: Plantae Division: Pinophyta Class: Pinopsida Order: Pinales Family: Cupressaceae Subfamily: Sequoioideae Genus: Metasequoia
  5. METASEQUOIA DAWN REDWOOD 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    METASEQUOIA DAWN REDWOOD Muddy Creek Formation, Beaver Head County, Montana Oligocene Age (5 million years ago) The Dawn Redwood (Metasequoia) is a genus that dates all the way back to the age of dinosaur it is related to the California Redwoods and was thought to be extinct until living specimens were discovered in central China in 1944. First called a “fossil tree” because it was believed extinct, the fast-growing tree is now a favorite ornamental tree. It was (and is) a deciduous conifer. Today’s Metasequoia has a full pyramidal shape, grows to 120′ high. Dimensions: 2.6 Inches Long, 2.2 Inches Wide. Dawn redwoods are fast-growing trees. They will grow too large for small gardens, but can be good in a wide range of larger gardens and parks. Although they live in wet sites in their native habitat they will also tolerate dry soils. Kingdom: Plantae Division: Pinophyta Class: Pinopsida Order: Pinales Family: Cupressaceae Subfamily: Sequoioideae Genus: Metasequoia
  6. Below is an open access paper about fossils from a Canadian subarctic kimberlite maar. Wolfe, A.P., Reyes, A.V., Royer, D.L., Greenwood, D.R., Doria, G., Gagen, M.H., Siver, P.A., and Westgate, J.A., 2017, Middle Eocene CO2 and climate reconstructed from the sediment fill of a subarctic kimberlite maar: Geology, v. 45, p. 619-622, http://geology.geoscienceworld.org.libezp.lib.lsu.edu/content/45/7/619 http://geology.geoscienceworld.org.libezp.lib.lsu.edu/content/45/7 Related papers: Doria, G., Royer, D.L., Wolfe, A.P., Fox, A., Westgate, J.A., and Beerling, D.J., 2011, Declining atmospheric CO2 during the late Middle Eocene climate transition: American Journal of Science, v. 311, p. 63–75, doi:10.2475/01.2011.03. https://www.eas.ualberta.ca/wolfe/eprints/Doria et al AJS 2011.pdf Wolfe, A.P., Edlund, M.B., Sweet, A.R., and Creighton, S.D., 2006, A first account of organelle preservation in Eocene nonmarine diatoms: observations and paleobiological implications: Palaios, v. 21, p. 298–304, doi:10.2110/palo.2005.p05-14e https://www.eas.ualberta.ca/wolfe/eprints/Wolfe_palaios2006.pdf Yours, Paul H.
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