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Found 21 results

  1. advanced wasp systematics

    Illustrating phylogenetic placement of fossils using RoguePlots: An example from ichneumonid parasitoid wasps(Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae) and an extensive morphological matrix Seraina KlopfsteinID1,2,3*, Tamara Spasojevic2,3 PLoS ONE 14(4): e0212942. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0212942 edit14/7:keywords added pone.0212942.pdf
  2. deep sclerochronology

    robiproufliersclerogeochemDSRDSRII2014.pdf The geochemistry of deep-sea coral skeletons: A review of vital effects and applications for palaeoceanography Laura F. Robinson, Jess F. Adkins , Norbert Frank , Alexander C. Gagnon ,Nancy G. Prouty , E. Brendan Roark , Tina van de Flierdt Deep Sea Research 99,2013
  3. conodont stratophenetics

    THE CHRONOPHYLETIC APPROACH:STRATOPHENETICS FACING AN INCOMPLETE FOSSIL RECORD by JERZY DZIK [Special Papers in Palaeontology, 73, 2005, pp. 159–183]
  4. G.Rex:classic plant taphonomy

    GMR THE FORMATION OF PLANT COMPRESSION FOSSILS: EXPERIMENTAL AND SEDIMENTOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS Gillian M.Rex Thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the University of London about 13 MB/TYPESCRIPT IMHO:unputdownable/indispensable for those interested in (Paleozoic) plant fossils below: a composite i concocted to give you an idea her Palaeontology article is probably somewaht of a condensation of this piece
  5. Histology and osteology/Cretaceous

    LINDGR Lindgren, J., Uvdal, P., Engdahl, A., Lee, A. H., Alwmark, C., Bergquist, K-E., ... Jacobs, L. L. (2011). Microspectroscopic evidence of cretaceous bone proteins. PLoS ONE, 6(4), [e19445]. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0019445
  6. Who are you calling dimorphic

    Parent_1997-Geobios.pdf Ontogeny and Sexual dimorphism of Eurycephalites gottschei(Tornquist)(Ammonoidea) of the Andean Lower Callovian(Argentine-Chile) Geobios 30-3,30-6-1997 recommended? You bet!! Avoid if allergic to quantitative analytic data treatment
  7. much to my shagreen

    HERE Diversity of dermal denticle structure in sharks: Skin surface roughness and three-dimensional morphology Madeleine V. Ankhelyi , Dylan K. Wainwright , George V. Lauder Journal of Morphology. 2018-00;1–23 recommended,and then some size: about 7,1 Mb
  8. something in the way it moved

    ajslocomeigenshmathemaquantmethodrose93.11Macleod.pdf Norman Macleod and Kenneth D.Rose: Inferring locomotor behavior in Paleogene mammals via eigenshape analysis American Journal of Science,v.293-A,1993 Given that the Paleogene was a time of incipient mammal diversification...
  9. discussion and expert opinion

    baronrauhutezcurbrusatnaturedinosauLangerdbnormanat.2017.pdf Nature,november 2017,v.551 Untangling the dinosaur family tree. Max C. Langer, Martín D. Ezcurra, Oliver W. M. Rauhut, Michael J. Benton, Fabien Knoll, Blair W. McPhee, Fernando E. Novas, Diego Pol & Stephen L. Brusatte ARISING FROM M. G. Baron, D. B. Norman & P. M. Barrett Nature 543, 501–506 (2017); doi:10.1038/nature21700 0,470 Mb
  10. Variation in Mesozoic cephalopoda

    morardguex081-090.pdf Bull.Soc.Geol.Fr,t.174-6/2003: Ontogeny and covariation in the Toarcian genus Osperleioceras
  11. On the use and abuse of ancient DNA.

    On the use and abuse of ancient DNA. Researchers in several disciplines need to tread carefully over shared landscapes of the past. Ewen Callaway, Nature. March 18, 2018 https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-03773-6 Some related articles are: Editorial: On the use and abuse of ancient DNA. Researchers in several disciplines need to tread carefully over shared landscapes of the past. Nature 555, 559 (2018) https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-03857-3 sex, power and ancient DNA. Turi King hails David Reich’s thrilling account of mapping humans through time and place. Ewen Callaway, Nature. March 13, 2018 https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-02964-5 and Ancient-genome study finds Bronze Age ‘Beaker culture’ invaded Britain. Famous bell-shaped pots associated with group of immigrants who may have displaced Neolithic farmers. Ewen Callaway, Nature, May 17, 2017 https://www.nature.com/news/ancient-genome-study-finds-bronze-age-beaker-culture-invaded-britain-1.21996 Yours, Paul H.
  12. The paleobiology of a winged reptile

    wankelhamiptchina.full.pdf 2,3 Mb Recommended, and then some
  13. Track tectonics

    graversichnolmilanJOGfulltext (2).pdf climate,diagenesis,rheology,aetiology. Knowledge of at least some common Structural-geological terms with regards to faulting and folding is necessary to totally understand this. Recommended,with the reservation that not every ichnite on this planet is preserved in eolianite(arenite("sandstone)" lithologies
  14. sunnyside up

    some members might actually like this Wilsonloolithegg-etal2014-taphoreviewindispensabldeformation.pdf\below:outtake
  15. an oldie,by someone who knows his fish teeth wardcollectiopracticeszoollinneapiscesmuseologyheuristixj.1096-3642.1984.tb00546.x.pdf
  16. smell you later

    2011_ZelenitskyRSL+aves{cladisticstheropod_olfaction.pdf Read this one. I found it informative*,and the methodology is sound. The proxy for the "sense of smell" is clearly explained Now I'm interested in the precise way smell is used by predators in general.. *in particular the short remark about sphenethmoid preservation
  17. theropod,well-known

    large download more than 60 Mb some of you might actually like this one Edit:found a previous post containing this very same PDF.Abyssunder posted it
  18. arthropod biometry

    The search function returned 11 pages or more.... This might already have been posted before If so ,apologies to the previous poster thesis
  19. Hi all, A couple of months ago, I acquired a small box of unopened Mazon Creek nodules via the forum. After reading whatever I could find on the freeze-thaw method (too many TFF topics to cite here), I started doing the following. First, I submerged the nodules in water (in 6 cm deep trays, fully submerging the nodules, which were placed next to each other, not stacking them) for one week (I was on vacation). Subsequently, I put the trays in freezer until frozen solid (1 day). I repeated these steps (duration 1 day each) until nodules popped open/could be opened by hand. Most of my nodules have opened by now (two to go still) and this is what I found: Some of the nodules seem to contain bits (e.g. the ones on lower right - any ID suggestions?), but most are empty, at least to my untrained eye (have zero previous experience with Mazon Creek material). I've read the "content" of the nodules varies from site to site, and general estimates range from 1/4 to 1/10 nodules yielding something fossiliferous. However, most others who obtained nodules from the same source reported nice finds in their batches. Given this, I was wondering whether I did something wrong method-wise. Also, is it worthwhile to re-split nodules, i.e. put them back in the freezer and try splitting them along a parallel plane? P.S. During the freeze-thaw cycling, many of the nodules started to "peel"; the outer parts started to disintegrate in somewhat onion-like fashion. Is this normal? Thanks for your input, Tim
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