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Found 42 results

  1. Freshwater plesiosaur material from the Jurassic of China

    Hey everyone Thought I'd share with you this new paper I found on ResearchGate; it basically reports the first discovery of remains of freshwater plesiosaurs from the middle Jurassic of Gansu province (in China). Gao, T., Li, D.-Q., Li, L.-F., and Yang, J.-T. (2019). The first record of freshwater plesiosaurian from the Middle Jurassic of Gansu, NW China, with its implications to the local palaeobiogeography. Journal of Palaeogeography 8:27. Abstract: Plesiosaurs are one of the common groups of aquatic reptiles in the Mesozoic, which mainly lived in marine environments. Freshwater plesiosaurs are rare in the world, especially from the Jurassic. The present paper reports the first freshwater plesiosaur, represented by four isolated teeth from the Middle Jurassic fluviolacustrine strata of Qingtujing area, Jinchang City, Gansu Province, Northwest China. These teeth are considered to come from one individual. The comparative analysis of the corresponding relationship between the body and tooth sizes of the known freshwater plesiosaur shows that Jinchang teeth represent a small-sized plesiosaurian. Based on the adaptive radiation of plesiosaurs and the palaeobiogeographical context, we propose a scenario of a river leading to the Meso-Tethys in the Late Middle Jurassic in Jinchang area, which may have provided a channel for the seasonal migration of plesiosaurs. Keywords: Freshwater plesiosaur, Middle Jurassic, Jinchang, Gansu Province, Palaeobiogeography. Here's the PDF of the article Gao et al2019Freshwater Chinese plesio.pdf Hope you all have a nice day! -Christian
  2. Hey all, I thought I would make a thread to show some of my shark teeth that I have collected from the Oxford Clay formation (mainly the Peterborough Member), feel free to comment if I have misidentified anything! Pre-Apologies, some of them are quite small.. Cheers, Jacob.
  3. Not much is published on UK theropod teeth so its nice to see this one. Although the teeth are not in the best shape its good to understand what clads are being found. This paper reports on two new isolated theropod teeth discovered on the Isle of Skye, Scotland representing at least two species. https://sjg.lyellcollection.org/content/early/2019/04/30/sjg2018-020
  4. Day One ; Locality Three. Midelt 19th February 2019 The Berber nomads are hospitable, generous and very tough : The snow disappears soon after you get onto the High Plains between the Middle and High Atlas ranges. Here are the High Atlas looming in the distance : As one approaches the town of Midelt, the layered geology of what is mostly Dogger, the old name for the Middle Jurassic, still used here, becomes clear : Midelt is full of fossil shops, however most of the fossils, including a kazillion trilobites, actually come from elsewhere. Jurassic ammonites may be from here, and many of the small cut and polished ammonites are from around here, but Midelt is most famous for its minerals, vanadinite especially. Also lead ores, barite and flourite. Top Tip : Don't buy fossils in Midelt unless it's a cut and polished small ammonite you want. Minerals, yes, many are beautiful and very cheap. Hmm, this looks interesting................. "Stop the car!"
  5. Our Moroccan trip from 19th-23rd February 2019. Day One; Locality One IFRANE Here we are near Ifrane, a village built by the French in the 1930's in a Swiss chalet style so there are pointy roofs instead of the usual traditional flat roofs of Moroccan buildings. This is wifey and Anouar, a Moroccan tour guide, old friend and one time student of English, his brother, our driver Abdullah, is taking the photo. Anouar paid for the trip, accommodation and food in return for me teaching him a little about the fossils, crystals and minerals that we encountered. The trip was mainly an exploratory voyage for me to discover where was worth revisiting when i was alone and had more time to spare. Somewhere in this area are outcrops of Pleinsbachian (stage of the Liassic/ Lower Jurassic) rocks that are stuffed with terebratulid brachiopods including more than a dozen species and subspecies that were first described from this locality, many unique to the site. Unfortunately, it's well off the beaten track, but I think i know roughly where now, so will return another day. Not time today! The area is covered in loose rocks, ploughed up in fields and roadbuilding, eroded from outliers or washed into the area in the autumn rainy season floods or spring melts. The ones behind us look Middle Jurassic to me, yellowish limestones, some with iron staining. Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks are also in the region. The high ridges in the background are basalt intrusions as the Atlas mountains were formed as Africa began to collide with Europe throughout the Palaoegene and Neogene and this resulted in a lot of volcanoes. We moved on north of the village and stopped where we saw a group of the local fossil huts. These are all year round businesses, but in the season, from May til October you will find little stalls selling local fossils and minerals all the way along the route through the Atlas Mountains to the Sahara. But the temporary stalls are all closed at this time of year, as it's pretty chilly and there are few tourists. Top Tip : Always pop into a couple of different shops and check out prices. Tell the next shopkeeper how much the previous one had stated and see if they'll undercut for a similar item. Always, always haggle! Top Tip : Ask which fossils and crystals are local if you don't know already; most of the shops in Morocco have local fossils and others from all over the country. Local fossils will usually be much cheaper, wait until you get nearer to the localities of other fossils and see the prices come down! Top Tip : If you have the time, ask the purveyors of local fossils to show you where they came from. Then go and have a look. They don't mind this at all.
  6. Finally got out again!

    The weather suddenly warmed up for a few days and started melting the snow, so I figured I'd grab the opportunity yesterday and check out the Geisingen area as long as the weather held. It's supposed to get colder again next week, so I thought I'd try to take advantage before more snow gets dumped on us. This was my first sojourn in over a month, so I was just glad to get out into the field, even if it didn't pan out much. I'd heard that a group had been digging with some success at the clay pit, so I thought I'd have a look-see to at least assess the situation there. It turned out that the spot where they had dug was pretty obvious, but the clay from above had slid down and buried it, which would make for a days work for a group of 4. I then decided to explore the old north end of the pit in the hopes that slips had perhaps created some new exposures, didn't find any though, so I doubled back down the east edge to a spot where I'd found some loose blocks in the distant past and started scratching around a bit. Luck was with me this time in the form of a nicely weathered block which gave up 3 well-preserved ammos and a few bivalves. I was needless to say already more than satisfied with these results, but since it was still early in the afternoon, I decided to check out a field nearby which had been productive in the past. I had noticed while driving past it on the way to the pit that it had been freshly plowed. This also turned out to be a good decision. I ended up after a couple of hours with a mini sack full of ammos in varying conditions of preservation, some in matrix, some free. All in all, it was a good day, so my itch has been stilled for another month or so, I would say. I didn't think to take my camera along again , so there are no in situ pictures, but I can at least provide you with a photo of the finds and I promise to post some of them once they're prepped.
  7. Fern/Plant Fossil help, please :)

    Any help that anyone can give me would be absolutely fabulous I'm a mature student trying to write her dissertation and I'm a bit lost Although I don't think it's essential to know what the fossils I find are, I think it would be nice to have a name , but not even the mighty Google has been much help! I also have a few more samples I may post later, if its not too much trouble cheers, Nicky
  8. Ichthyosaur Paddle Bone 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ichthyosaur Paddle Bone Weymouth Harbour, Dorset, United Kingdom Middle Jurassic (160 Million Years) Ichthyosaurs (Greek for "fish lizard" ) are large marine reptiles. Ichthyosaurs belong to the order known as Ichthyosauria or Ichthyopterygia ('fish flippers' – a designation introduced by Sir Richard Owen in 1840, although the term is now used more for the parent clade of the Ichthyosauria). Ichthyosaurs thrived during much of the Mesozoic era; based on fossil evidence, they first appeared around 250 million years ago (Mya) and at least one species survived until about 90 million years ago, into the Late Cretaceous. During the early Triassic period, ichthyosaurs evolved from a group of unidentified land reptiles that returned to the sea, in a development parallel to that of the ancestors of modern-day dolphins and whales, which they gradually came to resemble in a case of convergent evolution. They were particularly abundant in the later Triassic and early Jurassic periods, until they were replaced as the top aquatic predators by another marine reptilian group, the Plesiosauria, in the later Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. In the Late Cretaceous, ichthyosaurs became extinct for unknown reasons. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Reptilia Order: †Ichthyosauria
  9. Ichthyosaur Paddle Bone 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ichthyosaur Paddle Bone Weymouth Harbour, Dorset, United Kingdom Middle Jurassic (160 Million Years) Ichthyosaurs (Greek for "fish lizard" ) are large marine reptiles. Ichthyosaurs belong to the order known as Ichthyosauria or Ichthyopterygia ('fish flippers' – a designation introduced by Sir Richard Owen in 1840, although the term is now used more for the parent clade of the Ichthyosauria). Ichthyosaurs thrived during much of the Mesozoic era; based on fossil evidence, they first appeared around 250 million years ago (Mya) and at least one species survived until about 90 million years ago, into the Late Cretaceous. During the early Triassic period, ichthyosaurs evolved from a group of unidentified land reptiles that returned to the sea, in a development parallel to that of the ancestors of modern-day dolphins and whales, which they gradually came to resemble in a case of convergent evolution. They were particularly abundant in the later Triassic and early Jurassic periods, until they were replaced as the top aquatic predators by another marine reptilian group, the Plesiosauria, in the later Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. In the Late Cretaceous, ichthyosaurs became extinct for unknown reasons. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Reptilia Order: †Ichthyosauria
  10. I still continue to find this particular type of fossil. But can't quite seem to take a description of the find beyond (probable fish element). Found from the Peterborough Member (Callovian, Middle Jurassic) of the Oxford Clay. more commonly known as the Lower Oxford Clay. Also just to say other identical finds to this one seem to have the same appearance, shape, size and colouration. And are quite sporadic when found. All suggestions welcome. Scale bar is in millimetres.
  11. I mentioned in this thread that I would be taking my camera along the next time I go on a hunt to the Wutach Valley, and believe it or not, I actually remembered , so I figured I might as well take you all along for the trip. The goal is exposures of the murchisonae and bradfordensis zones in the middle Jurassic Aalenian layers, which are accessible on some forested hills in the viscinity. Prime finds are ammonites with some bivalves with some other fauna occasionally strewn amongst them. The first thing to do is to drive your car up a dirt road and then park it on a meadow with permission of the local farmer. Then you get your gear out of the car, head uphill over another meadow..... ...and duck into the forest. If you happen to have your camera with you, then you start taking photos of the forest flora. Forest anemone Celandine
  12. SKYE DINO PRINTS

    They keep finding great things on Skye! http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-43620237
  13. Ichthyosaur Vertebra a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ichthyosaur Vertebra SITE LOCATION: Weymouth Harbour, Dorset, United Kingdom TIME PERIOD: Middle Jurassic (160 Million Years) Ichthyosaurs (Greek for "fish lizard" ) are large marine reptiles. Ichthyosaurs belong to the order known as Ichthyosauria or Ichthyopterygia ('fish flippers' – a designation introduced by Sir Richard Owen in 1840, although the term is now used more for the parent clade of the Ichthyosauria). Ichthyosaurs thrived during much of the Mesozoic era; based on fossil evidence, they first appeared around 250 million years ago (Mya) and at least one species survived until about 90 million years ago, into the Late Cretaceous. During the early Triassic period, ichthyosaurs evolved from a group of unidentified land reptiles that returned to the sea, in a development parallel to that of the ancestors of modern-day dolphins and whales, which they gradually came to resemble in a case of convergent evolution. They were particularly abundant in the later Triassic and early Jurassic periods, until they were replaced as the top aquatic predators by another marine reptilian group, the Plesiosauria, in the later Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. In the Late Cretaceous, ichthyosaurs became extinct for unknown reasons. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Reptilia Order: †Ichthyosauria
  14. Ichthyosaur Vertebra a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ichthyosaur Vertebra SITE LOCATION: Weymouth Harbour, Dorset, United Kingdom TIME PERIOD: Middle Jurassic (160 Million Years) Ichthyosaurs (Greek for "fish lizard" ) are large marine reptiles. Ichthyosaurs belong to the order known as Ichthyosauria or Ichthyopterygia ('fish flippers' – a designation introduced by Sir Richard Owen in 1840, although the term is now used more for the parent clade of the Ichthyosauria). Ichthyosaurs thrived during much of the Mesozoic era; based on fossil evidence, they first appeared around 250 million years ago (Mya) and at least one species survived until about 90 million years ago, into the Late Cretaceous. During the early Triassic period, ichthyosaurs evolved from a group of unidentified land reptiles that returned to the sea, in a development parallel to that of the ancestors of modern-day dolphins and whales, which they gradually came to resemble in a case of convergent evolution. They were particularly abundant in the later Triassic and early Jurassic periods, until they were replaced as the top aquatic predators by another marine reptilian group, the Plesiosauria, in the later Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. In the Late Cretaceous, ichthyosaurs became extinct for unknown reasons. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Reptilia Order: †Ichthyosauria
  15. Ichthyosaur Vertebra a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ichthyosaur Vertebra SITE LOCATION: Weymouth Harbour, Dorset, United Kingdom TIME PERIOD: Middle Jurassic (160 Million Years) Ichthyosaurs (Greek for "fish lizard" ) are large marine reptiles. Ichthyosaurs belong to the order known as Ichthyosauria or Ichthyopterygia ('fish flippers' – a designation introduced by Sir Richard Owen in 1840, although the term is now used more for the parent clade of the Ichthyosauria). Ichthyosaurs thrived during much of the Mesozoic era; based on fossil evidence, they first appeared around 250 million years ago (Mya) and at least one species survived until about 90 million years ago, into the Late Cretaceous. During the early Triassic period, ichthyosaurs evolved from a group of unidentified land reptiles that returned to the sea, in a development parallel to that of the ancestors of modern-day dolphins and whales, which they gradually came to resemble in a case of convergent evolution. They were particularly abundant in the later Triassic and early Jurassic periods, until they were replaced as the top aquatic predators by another marine reptilian group, the Plesiosauria, in the later Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. In the Late Cretaceous, ichthyosaurs became extinct for unknown reasons. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Reptilia Order: †Ichthyosauria
  16. Sea Urchin Fossil - PHYMOSOMA a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Sea Urchin Fossil - PHYMOSOMA Morocco Middle Jurassic (about 170 Million Years Ago) Phymosoma is an extinct genus of echinoids that lived from the Cretaceous to the Eocene. Sea Urchins are a group of marine invertebrates that today can be found in almost every major marine habitat from the poles to the equator and from the intertidal zone to depths of more than 5,000 metres. There are around 800 extant species and the group has a long and detailed fossil record stretching back about 450 million years ago to the Late Ordovician Period. Commonly called "Sea Biscuits" of Sea Urchins Echinoid is Latin for "pickle". When alive these animals were covered with movable spines which gave protection and provided locomotion. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Echinoidea Order: Phymosomatoida Family: Phymosomatidae Genus: Phymosoma
  17. Sea Urchin Fossil - PHYMOSOMA a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Sea Urchin Fossil - PHYMOSOMA Morocco Middle Jurassic (about 170 Million Years Ago) Phymosoma is an extinct genus of echinoids that lived from the Cretaceous to the Eocene. Sea Urchins are a group of marine invertebrates that today can be found in almost every major marine habitat from the poles to the equator and from the intertidal zone to depths of more than 5,000 metres. There are around 800 extant species and the group has a long and detailed fossil record stretching back about 450 million years ago to the Late Ordovician Period. Commonly called "Sea Biscuits" of Sea Urchins Echinoid is Latin for "pickle". When alive these animals were covered with movable spines which gave protection and provided locomotion. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Echinoidea Order: Phymosomatoida Family: Phymosomatidae Genus: Phymosoma
  18. More to come

    Yesterday I was invited by a few collector friends to join them at a site in the Wutach valley which I had not yet had the opportunity to visit. It was a bit tricky getting there, so I'm glad that they guided me on the walk in. I had to leave earlier than them and ended up taking a wrong turn on the way out since I was deep in conversation with them on the way in and didn't pay proper attention to the lefts and rights, but that's another story. Suffice to say I spent an hour longer in the woods than planned, but I was saved by a nice person in the town I ended up in who drove me back to my car. Anyway, we had a successful day of collecting and I just wanted to show an ammonite that I just finished prepping. It's a Bullatimorphites bullatus partial phragmocone with a diameter of 4.5cm. The stratigraphy is the same as at my other Callovian site, so it was also interesting to compare exposures. I'll post some more here as I get them finished and hope to get back there for some more digging in a couple of weeks time.
  19. As many of you have probably noticed, I've been concentrating my fossil hunting efforts mostly on the Kimmeridgian in the Danube Valley or on the Callovian in the Wutach. Yesterday I felt like having a change of scenerey, so I decided to visit the classic site at Scheffheu in the Wutach Valley. I didn't realize it at the tme, but I hadn't been back there for a day of serious collecting for 5 years. My, how time flies! At any rate, it was amazing to see how the site had changed over these few years. The beaten path up the hill, which leads first through woods and which used to continue on up to the top through stone strewn open spaces was now practically overshadowed with tall shrubs and trees and only opened up at the very top. The exposures were basically the same ones, but some were now covered with debris and others were better exposed due to land slips. Also, some of them which had been composed of steely hard rock which was practically impossible to break into were now sufficiently weathered to be able to have a go at them. This time I thought to take along my camera, so I can give you a few impressions. First, a shot of the exposure in the middle Jurassic Aalenian which I decided after a bit of reconnaissance could be worth a closer investigation. I then decided to create a bench at this spot, which was out of the sun. I could tell by the makeup of the stone that I was in the staufensis Bank and it didn't take all that long before I had found a few ammonites. Yes, it was a little muddy in spots. In situ pics with a few ammos before and after excavation. Even though the matrix was weathered making for cracks, it is still extremely hard, so it's not always possible to extract the fossils in one piece. You just have to make sure to collect up all the bits and then there's some puzzle work to do at home. After a couple of hours at this level, I decided to try get down lower to the next fossiliferous layer, the sinon Banks, which provides a slightly different fauna. I had to remove a few larger blocks to this purpose. It was somewhat tedious, but it worked. Continued....
  20. Costileioceras sinon (Bayle 1878)

    You can see how large it used to be by the remnant of the body chamber on the outer flank. This is the index fossil for the two sinon bank horizons in the murchsonae zone. Old German Chronostratigrahy: Dogger (Braunjura) beta
  21. Macrocephalites sp. (Zittel 1884)

    From the album Middle Jurassic Ammonites from Southern Germany

    6.5cm. Found on a plowed field near Blumberg. More than likely Macrocephalen-Oolith, lower Callovian.
  22. Peltoceras athleta (Phillips 1829)

    Calcite mold. Index fossil for the athleta zone. Old German Chronostratigraphy: Dogger (Braunjura) zeta
  23. Limestone/calcite mold of part of the phragmocone with shell remnants. Index fossil of the coronatum zone.
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