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Found 22 results

  1. Upper Devonian Skull? Cashaqua Shale Member, Sonyea Group Western New York size - matrix block is 8" x 8" I found this fossil around 12 years ago. The locality it was found at is a nodule layer with well preserved coiled/straight shelled nautiloids, petrified wood (some very large), small gastropods, small pelecypods and that's about it. I have found one other weathered piece of bone before at this locality but this nodule, I knew when found it, that it was special. It needs to be prepared and would love to get it done. That is the reason I took it out of the mothballs. First, I would like to know exactly what it is. I'm thinking very early fish skull. My question to you is - what species is it and is it fish or something else like an amphibian? I know we are dealing with bone and not wood or something else from the Upper Devonian. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Happy Collecting from Mikeymig
  2. Thats new to me.

    Nassoviocrinus costatus (Goldring 1954) I posted recently about our latest fossil hunt in the Devonian of NY and showed you all the little crinoid we found. Whenever I find one of these ancient echinoderms that Im not familiar with, I show it to my friend George McIntosh of the RMSC. I sent some pics to George and he told me that it looks like Nassoviocrinus costatus. I never heard of that crinoid before so I had to look it up and learn a little. However, Index Fossils of NA was published in 1944 and this crinoid was described in 1954 and the internet shows very little about it (mostly publications by George ). I also couldn't find anything in the Treatise about it. If you have any information about this crinoid, I would appreciate it (especially photos). I have plans on getting this prepped and I will post the pics to this thread instead of starting another/separate post about it. I think its awesome that you can collect at the same locality for years and years yet still discover something new and exciting. Happy Collecting
  3. Spring of 2020 We took advantage of the time off and the break in weather to hunt one of our favorite streams here in Western New York. This was just a spring scouting mission to see what was exposed after the ice and snow has melted. Some of the more interesting finds were a crinoid crown (very rare for this locality) possibly Logocrinus, Spinocyrtia granulosa open with both valves, Orthospirifer marcyi, a large Megastrophia concava cleaned by nature with epibionts, and 3 small nearly complete Greenops. We also found many small Favosites coral colonies, large Heliophyllum corals, and 8 different species of brachiopods. Happy Collecting!
  4. Leicester Pyrite Member. This layer between the Windom and the Geneseo black shale represents a sea of death. I find very few types of fossils in this hard to process layer of solid pyrite. Well preserved cephalopods and Placoderm armor (Placodermi is a class of armored prehistoric fish) are the most common fossils found. This very thin horizon can be easily found in the outcrop if you just look for rust dripping down and staining the grey shales below this pyrite layer. Every year or two, a piece of Leicester Pyrite will fall from its position high up in the outcrop and slide down to the creeks edge. It takes a lot of work to process the pyrite for fossils. Every blow with your hammer delivers the strong smell of sulfur and a ton of sparks. The reward for all this patience and hard work are fossils preserved in brilliant fools gold. This unit is also the only rocks in my area that routinely contain the armor of Placoderm fish. Click this link for a detailed description of this unusual formation - http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.835.6976&rep=rep1&type=pdf&fbclid=IwAR0qdFymJq-Hd1_SqU3j3yDw5Trl0ih_KohTv-26Du3b1m9g9s2IYKlW0Xc
  5. September Hunt NY 2019

    September Hunt NY 2019 I cleaned our Devonian aged fossils from the other day and assembled a group photo of our favorite finds. The brachs are rare (Elythe, Meristina) and several rare and uncommon corals (Botryllopora, Heliophyllum delicatum, large Pleurodictyums) were found. The large orange Heliophyllum (4.5") is covered in epibionts. A large enrolled Eldredgeops found in a creek stone, needs more prepping and would have been over 3" long if prone. All finds were surface collected in NY. Thanks, Mikeymig
  6. Ancient Coral Ruins

    I dug up a Devonian Favosites coral recently with a group of corallites on the bottom of the colony that looked like tiny cliff dwellings
  7. Huge Colony Found

    Atactotoechus fruticosus Took me about 12 hours to reassemble this Bryozoan colony. Found Tuesday 8/27. The majority of the colony is very nice with all the fronds complete to tips. Its getting heavy with every new piece added. I was lucky that most of the colony was in shale and preserved from weathering. Thank you and Happy Collecting. Moscow fm., Kashong member, New York. 11" x 8" and 5+ lbs.
  8. Bryozoa Horta

    Bryozoa Horta Found - July 23, 2019 Name - Atactotoechus fruticosus Age - Middle Devonian Formation - Moscow, Kashong mbr. Locality - Livingston County, New York, USA Size - 8" x 5" Complete and unprepared. I find these colonies at only one locality here in NY. The majority of the Bryozoa colonies are branching and I have reassembled many over the years (pic included of a typical branching specimen). This is the first unbranching Atactotoechus specimen I found lying on the seafloor like a blob or a Star Trek Horta (in my eye anyway ). The specimen was found in life position on top of a mat of fenestrate bryozoan. A very rare find for me. Thanks, Mikeymig
  9. July 23,2019 Its been so hot working outside all week that today's fossil hunt in 70 degree temps felt cool. It was quiet in the stream (besides the sound of wildlife) when I got there in the AM and stayed that way all day. I didnt want to disturb the scene with me pounding on rocks so I surface collected and covered a large area of the stream. Along the sides of the stream are glacial erratic boulders, stones, and gravel. The tabulate corals (Chonostegites clappi, Favosites winchelli, Favosites sp.) I pictured in this post were found among these glacial rocks. In one gully off the stream I noticed a large boulder of Waterlime. I have found parts of Eurypterids in these displaced Silurian rocks before. Today I found a partial Eurypterid on one of these boulders but had to leave it where I found it. Too big and way too far to haul back. Happy Collecting, Mikeymig
  10. Attached to a large Megastrophia brachiopd, this is one of the best Aulopora coral colony I have ever found. A before and after prep photo from 2014 - 7/2019.
  11. Removed from a stream boulder, this Greenops like pygidium is larger than most complete Devonian trilobites from NY. Im not sure to what the exact species is so Im just calling it Greenops like. The age is Middle Devonian from Livingston County, New York. This could have been a near 5 inch bug if complete. Based on the dimensions of the largest complete Greenops sp. I have found in the collected area. From near spine tip to spine tip wide - 2.3" (58.50mm) Around 1.6" - 1.7" long (42mm)
  12. I Love Devonian Corals

    I Love Devonian Corals Favosities, Moscow formation, Livingston County, NY.
  13. When I was cleaning up scraps of shale from my prep floor today, I saw parts of trilobites on some of the pieces of shale. The rock was collected recently and a complete Eldredgeops was removed. This shale is Middle Devonian in age and is very hard (almost like limestone). Trilobites in this layer are well preserved and 3D. The trilo parts I found were the cephalon of a small Pseudodechenella, pygidium of a Greenops, and the eye of a Dipleura. I spotted the Dipleura as just a small piece of exoskeleton in the side of the shale. I knew it was a piece of Dipleura shell, and I knew it was just a piece, but I was curious. The fossil was lying on a crack in the shale that I easily split open with a small chisel. When the eye popped out of the matrix I thought it was pretty funny and said to my girlfriend "well i'll be darned".
  14. This collecting trip was more of a scouting expedition than an actual dig. After the snow and ice have melted, its fun to get out and see whats newly exposed/uncovered. Today we found the usual cast of characters like horn corals, tabulate corals, brachiopods, gastropods, pelecypods, and trilobites. I was mad at myself for not having faith in a trilobite fossil that I found on this trip. It was barely visible in the rock I found it in and I thought it would be incomplete just on how it looked. I started to remove the matrix (hard limey shale) with a hammer and small chisel. The bug popped out of the rock complete and fell on the floor. The trilobite landed on its glabella and some of its shell broke off. I think I found all the pieces but I should have been more careful. After all these years of collecting I should know better. I promised myself to make up for it and that I would find a killer bug this season with some new sites that I have lined up Thanks and Happy Collecting mikeymig
  15. The Three Kings Stationary epifaunal suspension feeders Heliophyllum is an extinct genus of corals that existed predominantly in the Devonian. Heliophyllum is of the order Rugosa and can be referred to as horn corals. This is what the internet tells you about this well known and popular fossil coral and that's about it. I'm fortunate to have collecting sites here in NY with excellent examples of this very cool fossil. I thought it would be neat for you to see examples of three types of Heliophyllum that I find. Of course the most common species I find is Heliophyllum halli (Edwards and Haime 1851) the solitary rugose. This is The King of Heliophyllum corals and are common to find here in NY at certain localities. Complete or "fresh" specimens are uncommon. A fresh coral would be one that has just weathered from the formation and is undamaged, unworn/tumbled by a stream. The majority of the Heliophyllum halli corals I find are 1-3 inches long with many being between 3-6 inches and a few over 6 inches in length. I find some with perfectly preserved epibionts that help tell a story of that paleoenvironment Heliophyllum halli lived in. The next King of this story is Heliophyllum confluens (Hall 1876) the colonial rugose coral. This species is much rarer then the solitary Heliophyllum halli. Confluens can form large colonies made up of several individual coralites that form a solid coral head. Each colony is different and many fantastic shapes can be found in this species. The third King is Heliophyllum delicatum (Oliver and Sorauf, 1994) a budding colonial coral. Delicatum is only found in the lower Deep Run Shale Member of the Moscow formation. This is my favorite of the three kings. They are the rarest Heliophyllum to find and complete undamaged colonies are near impossible due to their delicate nature. Unlike Heliophyllum confluens, delicatum coralites do not grow together to form a coral head. Instead each coralite individually grows out of a single main corals calyx. This can happen several times within the same colony forming a bouquet of fossil corals. I am not an expert on corals past or present. These are my observations over years of fossil collecting in New York. I hope this helps in your fossil ID or clears up some confusion when talking about these Kings of horn corals. mikey
  16. I love collecting Devonian corals. No two are exactly alike and some like this specimen are much rarer then the most collectible fossil (complete trilobites from any period) from New York. Confluens is a highly sought after coral species. Only found in a very limited area. I find one colony for every 500 solitary Heliophyllum halli and only one colony in ten is complete like this specimen. That's why this piece had to be prepped. Well preserved epibionts can be seen in great detail thanks to the meticulous prep job. Heliophyllum halli confluens (Hall, 1877) Middle Devonian colonial rugose coral 88mm x 71mm x 60mm. Found 9/12/2018 in Livingston County, New York. Found - Mikeymig, Prep - Malcolm T. BEFORE AND AFTER PREP PICTURES
  17. I posted a topic - Middle Devonian of Livingston County New York - recently and decided to include the other shelves in the display case. Also a fellow member requested to see more in the room so its their fault I had many more Oligocene fossils at one time and this is what I kept over the years (either I found it or it means something to me). Im sure there will be questions for me. Thanks, Mikeymig
  18. The Middle Devonian fossils of New York State are well known and have been for over 100 years. I grew up in Livingston County in whats called the Genesee River Valley. The streams that feed this river within the county are rich in Devonian fossils. I collect fossil corals, brachiopods, bryozoans, crinoids&blastoids, pelecypods, gastropods, cephalopods, phyllocarids, trilobites, fish, and wood. I rearranged my favorites in my collection and thought I would share since I feel the display will remain like this for some time. Out of the thousands of Middle Devonian fossils I have collected in 30+ years, these are the ones that mean the most to me. Thanks, Mikeymig
  19. How many molts?

    question - How many molts do you think it would take an Eldredgeops to go from 11mm (.43") to 64mm (2.52")?
  20. Big Miocene/Oligocene Mammal Jaw????

    I bought this jaw at a fossil show and the only info that came with it was "Badlands USA". The matrix looks Miocene Arikaree to me and not Oligocene but I'm not sure of course. Any information from a mammal/tooth collector will be appreciated. I have an idea of what it might be but I don't want to say anything until I hear from you all. Thanks, Mikey
  21. A 380 million year old lingula brachiopod I found in NY and a recent example I won in an auction from Florida. This little brachiopod is an example of a living fossil. I've been looking for one of these recent inarticulate brachs for a loooooooooong time. Thanks Mikey
  22. Some of the fossils I found when collecting with my nephew Joey and my Girlfriend Paula during February recess. Joey is my good luck charm. The rare crinoid with an attached gastropod (snail) is a first for me. It was nice to get out and do some hunting with my crew. Im getting the crinoid prepped and will post pics to the thread when that happens. Thanks Mikey
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