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Found 13 results

  1. Hi gang, I'm working fervently to prepare a post about the astounding time I had at Fossil Mountain in Utah during my fossil run back in July. (Will take me months to process and identify all these samples from four states.) I found a few partial trilobites at the upper layer of the Lehman formation, but I'm having difficulty identifying them. I freely admit I'm exceedingly weak at trilobites ID. these aren't the best pictures or even the best specimens, but I was there solo and the scree around the cliffs was pretty unstable so I erred in the side of caution. Anyway, Any suggestions much appreciated. I'll post better pictures tomorrow when I get my camera back off of my microscope at work.
  2. Cowboy Pass, Utah Ammonites

    Picture Heavy! On my first day in Millard County, I started out at the U-DIG quarry. I got lots of trilobites, but nothing too spectacular. (I'll share them in a separate post as there is quite a bit of prep work to do!) Honestly, I got a bit bored at the quarry. Sure, I enjoy digging fossils, but the challenge just isn't there. So after four hours, I decided to drive through Marjum Pass to Cowboy Pass. This is the view exiting Marjum Pass. (That is a truly epic drive on its own, but I didn't stop at any of the fossil sites in there!) Almost there! For those that don't know, distance and time behaves a bit strangely when solo in the desert. Finding road signs is even stranger. If you do decide to do a Millard County run, you'd better be able to use a topo map and a compass because you cant trust GPS maps and mobile phones have no service out here. I found that even the road atlas was untrustworthy. It took me three months of research to pinpoint the exact locations of the exposed Thaynes Formation areas of the Pass. Doing the homework paid off as I was able to find the "easy" site almost immediately. I'm not really into giving out exact locations, but I will say "The Book" is correct and accurate and that this photo shows the landmark referred to in an old Millard County rockhound guide. I know I could have just asked folks where they were, but a big part of this hobby for me is the satisfaction of confirming my research skills. One can easily drive to the "easy" site, but the other two (actually three...) require a pretty rugged hike. However, as you are about to see, it is well worth it. I found my first in the overburden some hack left behind. In fact, at the easy site I didn't even need to use any tools as whoever was there last ignored dozens of nice specimens! I will also add, I hope it wasn't someone from here...as I cleaned up all your %#!$%^&* trash for you. Three full bags of garbage and you left a virtually brand new gad pry under the pile of beer cans. Thanks. I needed a gad pry later! Anyway, Here are some of the specimens I collected from the various sites. Most of them need lots of prep work. Here's a few as they were found: I'll post more pictures at a later date as there is a lot of prep work to do on many of the specimens! So, in short, Cowboy Pass is well worth the excursion. Be prepared to do some real work, and study up on the site before you go. Also, don't be a jerk and leave a mess like the one I found...that is how public lands get closed to the public.
  3. Gerster Fm. Productid Brachiopods

    This particular species had spines attached to the shell which is not all that common. There are four spines attached on the thumbnail brachiopod. The holes in the shells were where spines used to be attached. Found during this trip here:
  4. Acrothele subsidua

    Found associated with Elrathia kingii and Itagnostus interstricta trilobites. See field trip report here:
  5. Itagnostus interstricta

    From the album Trilobites

    Wheeler Formation Millard County Utah, United States

    © 2018 by Jay A. Wollin

  6. Bolaspidellus housensis

    From the album Trilobites

    Wheeler Formation Millard County Utah, United States

    © 2018 by Jay A. Wollin

  7. ALGAE ?

    This was sent to me in a sort of starter pack of fossils from the United States about 40 years ago. It doesn't look like any algae or stromatolites I have seen from this site. Any ideas anyone? More pics to follow.
  8. As I announced a while back I am planning a trip out to Utah for late August/ early September. I plan on spending two days in the Delta area prospecting for trilobites and other fossils in the paleozoic rocks of the region. I keep seeing references to Fossil Mountain and that it has Ordovician fossils but is it worth the trip? Will I be finding slabs with fossils or loose fossils or a combination of the two? Considering that I have to mail all my finds back home to Philadelphia I don't want to ship large quantities of fossil hash that will just wind up in my garden. Anyone have some material they have collected that they can post a picture of? Thank you in advance. -Dave
  9. For those of you who have dreamed about Middle and Upper Cambrian trilobites in western Utah, this is the publication that will open the door to exploring. The Utah Geological and Mineralogical Survey has printed many well done booklets and books on Millard County, Utah. The intent was to draw in Petroleum Geologists to explore the general areas, but also provide a wealth of information to those interested in Paleontology and Cambrian Stratigraphy. To the west side you can even be directed to Triassic Ammonites, with Pennsylvanian and later outcrops also in the vicinity. The camping possibilities are everywhere. Some box canyons are wonderful... but trying to find a flat spot can be challenging. When I say flat... everything is either up hill... or down hill. You have the Topaz Mountains to the north, Dugway Geodes (good luck finding one...) and Pioche, Nevada mining areas further to the west. Excellent cheeseburgers in Pioche, by the way. The area is... wide open and lacks facilities. So gas up, water up, block ICE and get groceries in Delta. It might be 45 miles to this area... you can check it on the road map... but you cannot miss it. But... finding the right road(s) can be tricky as they split and take a different course quickly. My recommendation... look for the 100 foot power lines strung over the flat country and once you intersect them near shale outcrops... you have arrived. To the north is the U Dig site which is marked along the way as well, and cuts off to the right from some popular Middle Cambrian exposures. Geology of the Canyon, House and Confusion Ranges, Millard County, Utah by F. W. Christiansen & others, 1951.
  10. DSCN2445

    From the album Adventure is an individual thought!

    One of many "hidden quarries" in productive trilobite country. About 15 miles south of the U Dig site. Hard work but with a shovel and tools to split shale, you will find more than you would have expected. Elrathia is the most common trilobite to be found here. Not too far west and you will find Pernopsis, blind trilobites that look like "bar bells". Also some "unknowns" that you need to take home and figure out WHAT it is. Sometimes, multiple complete specimens in the 3/8 inch to 1 1/2" sizes! Camp just below the quarry or look around at loose slabs for trilobites washed down the cliffs.
  11. DSCN2443

    From the album Adventure is an individual thought!

    Many old trilobite quarries to be found. Some are hidden right over a small hill. Some are obvious and alongside the road. Plenty of camping spots. Visit the U Dig site in the area. All of this is just west of Delta, Utah. Before you go, gas up, water up, eat a good meal before leaving town and head to the House Range mountains.
  12. DSCN1907

    From the album Adventure is an individual thought!

    A typical outcrop in Western Millard County, Utah. Wheeler Shale, Cambrian.
  13. Utah's West Desert, Unusual Find

    This weekend we were out at a common site for hunting invertebrates, the Ibex - Fossil Mountain area, (near the Sevier Dry Lake Bed for Google Earth users). We found lots of bivalves, and ammonoids, brachiopods, and even a few cone nautiloids as we worked our way up the mountainside. On the way back down, we detoured away from the camp and a few hundred yards south into a shallow wash. Under a limestone ledge, in a bed of shale we found the following specimens. We sent a poor picture to the State Paleontologist of the major site find -which looks for all the world like a ribcage sticking out of the strata (!). He helpfully dismissed the photo as a nautiloid and sent us on our way. I'll attach that photo here at the end. Now that we're home, and we have a few samples cleaned up, we want to share what else we found within a few feet of "the ribs." Aside from these few samples, we left the site intact. We carefully covered the larger fossils to delay erosion and hopefully hide them from vandals. It is a remote area, but not exactly a secret. Here is the first, I hope these pictures are suitable for identification.
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