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Found 1,297 results

  1. Beaumaris ID

    G'day everyone! I just returned from a trip to Beaumaris today and found something wierd. At first I thought It was a crab as crab fossils were found from this locality: https://beaumarisfossils.org/crabs-burrows/ but I am not too sure. The fossil comes from the Beaumaris Sandstone Formation, late Miocene to early Pliocene. Thanks, Dan Crab fossils found at Beaumaris
  2. Picked up this beautiful pathological Cuban Meg Tooth a couple days ago. It measures 5.25” with a killer twist.
  3. rapp creek hunting

    A perfect weather day anyway! "My" spots had been over-run, so started digging with a garden trowel at the base of an undercut bank, hoping roots might hold a cowshark (near where I found my only cowshark symphyseal years ago) or bigger (mako) tooth. More gravel than shells so guessing near middle of the stream bed in the past (nothing big, so not too distant past!) Did find three ecphora (not prized 30 years ago); the biggest did not survive a chunk of bone in the bucket alongside (may try to piece back together; a sickening loss, though missing its tail). Four verts (often seem to find in gravel), some round Tilly bones, 30+ small teeth, nothing exceptional, a stippeled piece of vertebra(?), skate teeth, small broken stinger . Lots of concretions, possibly some shrimp coprolites in a piece (will wait for total drying); the first ones I found were in the creek, since then all have been on a river beach. Bird eggs gone from nest (hopefully as fledglings), a black rat snake, many different frogs, a salamander (eft? ran on shore), and some interesting birds, that I didn't recognize. Wish I found more, but happy with a short hunt (two hour), not a difficult trip.
  4. Museum volunteers discover new species of extinct heron at North Florida fossil site by Halle Marchese , Florida Museum of Natural History, PhysOrg. https://phys.org/news/2019-05-museum-volunteers-species-extinct-heron.html the paper is: David W. Steadman and Oona M. Takano. A New Genus And Species Of Heron (Aves: Ardeidae) From The Late Miocene Of Florida. Bulletin of the Florida Museum of Natural History.Published On-line: April 6, 2019. https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/files/3615/5456/8592/vol55no9archival.pdf Yours, Paul H.
  5. Hemipristis serra 07

    From the album Sharks and their prey ....

    Hemipristis serra North-Central Florida Hawthorne formation Miocene

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  6. Mammal Bone ID from Rare Location

    Hello everyone, I was hoping someone could help me with the identification with this bone that I found at the Royal Peacock Opal Mine in the Virgin Valley, Humboldt County, Northeastern Nevada, USA. Geologic age is the Miocene. Bones are very rarely found in this area. It is mostly opal, petrified wood, and fossilized wood. I am guessing this came from a land mammal. Possibly a camel. Does anyone have a better idea what it could be? I donated this bone to the mine owner due to its rarity. I thought it should stay where it was found. PS: In the next few days I will post a couple of other rare fossils found at the mine by the owner's son (Jake Anderson).
  7. So I was recently going thru some Florida tooth material (Mio/Plio-Pleistocene) from years ago and realized I had lumped a bunch of this stuff in a packet without investigating them too thoroughly. I started to bug Jeff about several and thought I'd see what you all thought as well so I could learn something more from you all. So just 4 teeth for this thread. I was noticing #1's serrations were pretty coarse and well developed and unusual and I was asking about its possibilities and the meg possibility came up. I then found #2 tonight in another bag and it has some similarities to #1. Neither seem very thick/robust or show a bourlette but their serrations are definitely different than most I have seen. #3 has those finer serrations and shape I usually have put into the Carcharhinus ID bucket. Could they all be Carcharhinus? And lastly #4 may be pathological? What say you all? I know messing with single teeth ID's is pushing the envelope but appreciate any thoughts... Here's another view of just # 1 and #2. And lastly #4: Thanks for the help. Regards, Chris
  8. Miocene shell

    A very thin and fragile shell. 50-60 mm. Turkey/Karaman/Tırtar formation - Serravalian
  9. Larger Dolphin Tooth

    As many know, I have hunted the Peace River Florida for over a decade. I love finding whale teeth and have been fortunate in finding them. I also like dolphin teeth, but the ones I find range from tiny (half inch) to small (1.25 inch). Today I found my largest dolphin tooth at 1.6 inches. It is broken but I really like it. Interestingly , it is hollow from the break to the root. So, what do we know or can surmise about the dolphin that had this tooth? Kentriodontid ? For me, this tooth at this size is really rare in the Peace River.
  10. Hey fellow TFF Members! Accidentally posted this in the wrong section earlier.... Back again with another video and I'll get straight to it. I found one of the nicest megs I have found here in Florida! The way this thing was found is just amazing as well. Give it a watch when you get some time
  11. Hey fellow TFF Members! Back again with another video and I'll get straight to it. I found one of the nicest megs I have found here in Florida! The way this thing was found is just amazing as well. Give it a watch when you get some time
  12. I am not sure, where to post this, please feel free to move it to the appropriate topic. I made the schematic drawing of mollusc habitats already more then 2 years ago, now I have pepped it up with shell pics of the most abundant species. All shells are self collected and in my collection, but no scale, no names... The largest pics are the most abundant molluscs in this area, there are only about 5 of them, that are really super-abundant. There is a lot of hidden info in this pic, but is it discernible without any further explanation? Maybe you have at least some fun ! Franz Bernhard
  13. Sharks' teeth from Belgium

    Dear teeth and bones' experts I need some help to ID a lot of sharks' teeth that I got from Belgium. 90% of them have no ID. Here is the overall picture of the lot (with numbers of groups): The seller put them in separate packages, so I took the pictures as he grouped them. This is the most numerous group no.1 - to the right on the first picture:
  14. I've been hearing about Chippokes Plantaion State Park in Surry, VA for the last year or so. Finally got out there this weekend. Being a shell person, I was rather disappointed that the only thing one is allowed to collect at that park is shark teeth. But, they do allow something to be collected and pictures don't require more shelves to be installed in the family room. Here's a video I did f the trip: Plus a few still highlights: I I think the vultures were waiting for the cliff to fall on my head. Sun up, sundown and a beautiful day in-between The shells just carpet the beach at low tide! Look, Ma! Both valves! There was definitely more to that Ecphora. I just didn't take a picture after I pulled it out. All it was missing was the protoconch.
  15. My Giant Alopiid Collection

    Hello Everyone, I’m rather fond of Giant Alopiids, and I have taken to collecting them. I find it strange that such a wonderful, yet mysterious creature remains relatively unknown and scantly studied. I may have space in my high school schedule for an independent study senior year, and I’ve considered using it to make a poster or paper on their morphology, taxonomy, phylogeny and such for The Rostrum or something. However, I’ve heard tell that there is already a comprehensive paper on giant alopiids in the works. We’ll see if there will be anything left for me to discuss. Anyway, collecting them is a slow process as they are quite rare and I am quite cheap (I have yet to find one myself). I thought I’d make a thread to show off what I have thus far and to keep them cataloged for myself. Hopefully this page will grow as time goes on Dashes are around 1 inch apart. South Carolina Alopias grandis
  16. Oh, and one other tooth that I (actually my dig-happy girlfriend found the Tiger) found at Ernst yesterday. It looks like a relatively common lower Mako, but has such a bulbous root on it that I originally thought it was the elusive Paratodus Benendeni. However, it not having a bourlette leads me to believe that it's truly a false, False Mako. Thoughts? The blue cube is 1" square. Many thanks. I just realized that the false False Mako even has a false bourlette (Mineral staining) on it.
  17. Took a jaunt out to Shark Tooth Hill area, Ersnt Quarries to be specific, yesterday. Not too productive, but a few decent Makos, a little (7mm) fish vert, and the one inquired about here. It has the look of a Tiger shark of some sort, but is only 11mm across the root (cube it's on is 1" square). It has serrations on the cusp(let), distal and mesial sides. I don't recall the Galeocerdo Contortus I've seen having all three surfaces with serrations. It looks a lot like a Hammerhead, but I don't see serrations on the distal side on the crown on it. Can someone tell me what this is? Many thanks. Cheers.
  18. Bone ID request

    Good afternoon, I have now found a total of four bones with this same shape. Found in Jacksonville, NC at Onslow Beach. I posted one over a year ago that was too worn to identify. Since then I have found these three with two in much better shape. Any idea what this bone has come from in relation to location on body and hopefully what animal? Thank you
  19. INSANE Megalodon Shark Tooth Hunt

    Hey TFF Members! Got another insane video for you here! We had some friends join us for some shark tooth hunting and we struck pure gold! It was great to share the passion with good folks, and hopefully inspire their kids to be future fossil enthusiasts! Give the video a watch when you can. I'll also post a photo of some of the best teeth below!
  20. Mystery items from LC: Marine mammal?

    Here are a pair of head-scratchers that I found i at LC. The first is from the Pungo River Fm I thought was a bivalve steinkern, but it is not carbonate, which one would expect in the lime layers of the formation (that, or phosphate, and itisnt phosphate). There is still some matrix on it. So that leaves me with maybe some portion of the bulla/ear region of a marine mammal, but that's purely a guess. The second is from the Pliocene Yorktown Fm, and the material appears to be the same as that of cetacean tympanic bulla. But it doesn't look like one, or like anything Ive seen from a cetacean. Any ideas? thanks
  21. Over the past few months work has been crazy (although in a VERY good way) and I haven't had the time to post summaries of my past few trips to the Calvert Cliffs formation. Long stories short, I was able to get down to the cliffs on a few occasions between Feb-April 2019. Most of the time I was able to go when tides were good, however on my most recent trip they were horrible. I've met a lot of awesome people along the beach and developed many good friendships...in fact I think that 95% of the people I met have been extremely friendly, genuine, willing to give advice, and just plain good people, which is something I love about this hobby. I was even able to talk the wifey into coming down once...of course she loved it, and of course she found a larger tooth than I ever have. About half my trips were to Brownies and the other half were to a private site that I have access to. The beaches have changed dramatically over these few months with numerous falls and spills, which highlights the importance of keeping your head on a swivel and always respecting the cliffs. On one occasion I made the 3 hour trip just to turn around about 2 hours later because the cliffs were so unstable. Hopefully we have a dry summer, the piles get a chance to wash out, and the cliffs become a bit more stable. Anyway, enough rambling. Below are some pics of my better finds from the two sites, I hope you enjoy them. No complete Meg yet, but I hope that changes when I make another trip down next week!
  22. Brownie Beach Fossil ID

    We found a number of possible fossils we can not id at Brownie Beach, MD. Would you help us id these? Turtles, Crocodies, Sponges, nut pods, ? May I post more pics with this? Thank you.
  23. It's been a while since I posted a trip but today was one that I won't forget in a long time, I was lucky enough to be there when my wife found a 4 3/4" meg...that my dumb butt walked by at least twice! DOH! Beautiful day on the river, falling water all day long and the temperature was awesome. Total haul of teeth The megs Too bad this one was missing the root. I dug the rib bone out of a chunk of matrix Atlas found by my wife Love the colors on this Found a couple of teeth hiding in some chunks of matrix
  24. Florida gastropod ID help

    Hey Gang, Looking for some help on what these guys are. Family and/or Genus would be great. Probably Tampa member of the Arcadia formation? Hillsborough county, Florida. Miocene? Here's unfortunately a real lousy comparative photo of the other specimen, but with a much better view of the shape of the aperature. Any help is appreciated. Thanks! Regards, Chris
  25. Petrified Wood Under UV

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood Family Cupressaceae Miocene New Castle County, Delaware
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