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Found 1,196 results

  1. rapp creek hunting

    Tried to get out before the ice storm in search of cowshark teeth (found none and hunted hard). Lots of small sand tiger teeth, including a crooked one and a symphyseal, and lots of split teeth. Lots of drum teeth, (the dull side is more interesting than the glossy side). Four angel teeth that stand up on their triangular base, two whose root is damaged. Two or three mako (broken). Lots of small triangular teeth (dusky, bull, gray? not sure what all they are). Lots of batoid/ skate teeth, but no stingers or denticles. One whole vert and a small disc echinoid. Lots ofsmall 'whale bone' and bits to go through. Not what I was after, but quantity if not quality was good.
  2. Sand Tiger shark

    From the album Fossil Collection

  3. Hey Everyone! This is the 3rd and final video we did with our buddy Bob from Canada. We hunted sharks teeth for 2 days and this was definitely the more productive of the two! We found a beautiful little juvenile Meg, a huge crocodile toe bone, and a bunch of beautiful teeth and other fossils. It was a great time and we can't wait for Bob to make it back down south!
  4. Our Marine Mammal Classification Lab

    This is our 6th-8th grade fossil program. I was not going to start running these until the fall of this year but thanks to an awesome donation and a few identifications from @Boesse , I am going to do a few with these with displaced students from Paradise really soon. They need creative education and I need a few opportunities to do the lab and make tweaks. I am super excited and extremely nervous about this lab. Marine mammals are so well adapted to an aquatic life that they really present a great opportunity for presenting complex scientific concepts to kids. The difficulty in using fossils is that I lack the expertise to be able to identify a lot of it but at the same time, I have a number of fossils that are perfect for kids to handle. I do have a basic idea of what fossils I have now so I can start working out a presentation. The first part of the presentation is going to be a quick run down on the basics of classification, using mammals, and the basics of marine mammal biology. We are only discussing two orders of marine mammal, cetacea and carnivora because we only have fossils from those orders. I do have a Desmostylus tusk but I am not going to use that yet. I need a considerable amount more knowledge about that species and its relationship to sirens before I present. We do not have any Odobenidae fossils and I am not sure we ever will. I plan on running down the basic characteristics that separate the two orders. Once we have covered the basics of the two orders, we will discuss the whales in bit more more depth. At each point in the presentation we will present them with fossils that represent the two orders. This is only going to be about 20 minutes. The rest of the time, they will be examining fossils ! Then comes the lab. We will have stations set up that feature some fossils from each order and a visual guide in helping them identify the fossils. Essentially we want them to enjoy checking out the miocene fossils and learning through a hands-on approach. We want them exploring and coming to their own conclusions using the tools they have. The final station will be the students getting a chance to test their abilities by determining if a Cetacean ear bone belongs to an odontoceti or mysticeti type whale. This is the basic outline and I have quite a bit of work to do on this but I really like the potential. I would like to get a few more STH mammal teeth so we have more for the kids to examine and a few more cetacean ear bones as they are diagnostic which is a good thing to have in an education program but overall I feel good about the fossils we have. We have some with identifications but also a few things that are not known which is a good mix. Some of the fossils... Pic 1- a number of different vertebra. There is a shark vert, several cetacean verts and at least one that looks like it might be from carnivora. I have a few more that are not in the picture too. Pic 2- 4 STH Allodesmus teeth, 4 small STH Odontoceti indet teeth ( I will probably suggest Kentriodon to the kids), a STH Aulophyseter tooth, a much different STH Odontoceti indet tooth, and just for fun, a pretty wicked looking sperm whale tooth from North Carolina. This gives the students a chance to visualize the difference between carnivora and cetacea. Pic 3- A few ear bones that will be the final part of the lab. The two STH fossils are the key. One is a mysticeti and the other is an odontoceti. The big one from North Carolina is more for visual flair. It is a big ear bone, the kids will dig it I think. not pictured, the box of bones the kids will handle, the majority of which came via donation.
  5. Globidens alabamaensis?

    While collecting at a location in SE Virginia which produces a mixture of material from the Eocene Nanjemoy Formation and late Miocene/early Pliocene Yorktown Formation, I was shocked to find what I believe to be a cretaceous Globidens sp. anterior tooth fragment. My only explanation for this would be that it must have been redeposited into the Eocene beds and finally exposed with rest of the material. The texture is classic Globidens. The only other species with a slightly similar texture found within these formations (though still markedly different), would be Squalodon sp., however if the tooth were more complete it would clearly prove to be hollow with a conical interior consistent with squamates like mosasaurs. The fragment is approximately 7/8" x 1/2". This is the first bit of possibly cretaceous material I have found from these exposures, so it would be quite interesting if the general consensus is a Globidens sp. Your thoughts would be much appreciated! Thanks, Ash
  6. This Gastropod does not seem to be in Ellen Moore's book and there seems to be different opinions as to what it might be. Is there anyone who can tell me exactly what this is and show me a picture of the specimen they refer to? Miocene Astoria Formation Oregon
  7. hello i like to have replicas of the animals that i have so this is collaboration work on Gomphotherium if there is interest maybe ill make plastic resin casts for you guys that want it
  8. Hey TFF Members! If you saw the last video I shared, we took our buddy Bob from Canada out Echinoid hunting in Yankeetown recently. He was in town for a few days so we also had a chance to take him shark tooth hunting! We didn't find anything huge, but we found a lot of really great fossils. The teeth here are very colorful and there are a lot of them. Of course, this video isn't lacking in Cris and I's strange shenanigans Even though we didn't find anything insane, it was an amazing day spent with great people, and we found tons of cool fossils. This beats a day at the office any day! Give it a watch if you are interested and have some time
  9. Rapp beach hunting

    Headed to the beach hoping the weatherman was right and could get to the edge of the shells piled at the shoreline just out of reach. The wind was predicted from the SW, but was calm then switched to the NE, and the tide stopped falling. The temperature stayed about 5 degrees lower than predicted as well. Couldn't get to the line of shells where I expected the bigger teeth should be, but with the wind causing a slow wash, teeth started appearing and I got a good variety, colorful and in good shape, though no big ones (and no cowshark, think I lost one in the wash). Will post the whale vertebra tomorrow after it dries. Weather is supposed to be warm tomorrow, may try another beach.
  10. Finally another fossil hunt!

    I’m quite busy these days, so it’s been a few months but I finally found a few hours to dart out and get a hunt in at brownies on Saturday. There had obviously been a myriad of collectors who braved the cold prior to me, so I wasn’t expecting much. However, I did end up with a few decent specimens. It feels good to get out into nature and climb over some trees once in a while. Despite my muted expression, I had a blast!
  11. rapp creek hunting

    Has been about 38 F (~4 C) or less since Sat morning and I was getting cabin fever. The tides are running high for the beaches, east wind blowing in the water. So I decided to go to the creek in pouring cold rain (45F, 7C); the creek was icy cold. Was probably stupid, it was difficult to work some new spots in water high over my ankles and both waterproof shoes eventually filled with water. Both quality and quantity of teeth were low. However I was lucky and found TWO nice cow shark teeth (without roots), a small mako (no serrations) along with the usual sand shark spikes and some small gray shark teeth. No angel shark and few drum teeth? Hopefully will turn up when the water quiets down.
  12. Isurus sp. "in situ"

    From the album Fossil Collection

  13. Okay, I finally unpacked some boxes a couple of weeks with the intent of finally getting this officially named. I believe it is Palmoxylon Mohavensis and I believe from the Miocene. Found in the Mojave Desert in California, north and east of Red Rock Canyon and north and west of Last Chance Canyon about 40 years ago. Size of overall specimen is approximately 4" x 5" x 6" In addition to not knowing the true identity, I think this is also down by the roots? Starting with the end that has been cut and somewhat polished. Graining is confused leading me to think root end of tree?? Opposite end
  14. Odd Shark Tooth

    Hey everyone, I found this tooth in the spoil piles at the Aurora fossil museum in NC a few years ago. It's been sitting on my desk for a while and I haven't gotten around to getting it ID'd on the forum, but there's no time like the present. I have no idea what it could be from, maybe a pathological Carcharhinus or Physogaleus? The root is about 2.5 cm wide and the overall length (measured by the blade angle) is about 2 cm.
  15. Isle of Sheppey

    Today I am heading out for the first time to investigate the Miocene of England, previously I had only hunted the Jurassic I am going to the isle of sheppey and later today I will post the results of my trip
  16. Our final stop in the Shark program is of course the giant Sharks of the Miocene. We wrap our adventure through the timeline of shark evolution by giving the kids what they expect to see, big shark teeth. Truthfully, we do not have many large shark teeth. I went for interesting teeth not big teeth but we have a few that will grab the kids attention. We give a very brief introduction to the giant sharks with a 2 inch Otodus tooth. We can spend too much time on Otodus or the ancestors of Megalodon as it just do not have time ( plus we do not have teeth from Auriculatus, Angustidens, or Chubutensis). After that brief bit, we ask the kids a question.... What shark is the ancestor of the modern Great White ? We give the kids a chance to answer that question for themselves by connecting them to the sharks that swimming in the ocean off the coast of California 12 million years. I want to explore the origins of the most well known modern shark and connect them to the fossil rich area just 6 or so hours south of where they live so we journey to Sharktooth Hill to finish the program. Isurus planus was a fairly large shark and probably reached lengths of over 20 feet. I have not found a lot of material about planus but I would think that based on tooth size, 20 feet seems possible. I have seen 2 inch planus teeth though I have nothing that big myself. We also show the kids a couple Isurus desori teeth only to mention that they MIGHT be related to modern Short-fin Makos. We then jump into another species that is present at STH and the one the kiddos will be most familiar with, Megalodon. This is obviously a super important species to talk about because it is the most popular prehistoric shark. It is the T-rex of sharks. Biggest teeth of any shark found so far. Most likely the largest shark ever and quite possibly the largest fish. They ate whales. They were also common and the apex predator in the worlds oceans during their time. We do not know what they look like but my son is working on his version of Megalodon and it has elements of a basking shark to it along with the traditional Great White like appearance. I will tell the kids that for a long time, Megalodon was thought to be the ancestor of great whites but science has uncovered another possible contender for being the ancestor of great whites. Carcharodon hastalis was a large shark that probably reached 30 feet in length. They had large teeth and were probably fast swimming ambush predators. I remember reading somewhere, that evidence existed from STH that the Broad-tooth White Shark hunted early pinnipeds from underneath, just as modern white sharks do. I can not remember where I read that and I want to track that down again to verify before saying that to kids. Anyway, we explain that they were probably very similar in appearance to great whites and filled a similar ecological role. I will add that transitional teeth have been found that are a pretty conclusive link the chain of white shark evolution but we want them to check out the teeth and judge for themselves. Our presentation teeth Pic 1 I. planus and I. desori. These are not the exact teeth for program. I do have a few bigger teeth but these were in my desk as I am doing this lol Pic 2 Our 5.08 inch Megalodon tooth and the tooth that I suspect will be the most popular in the presentation. Not the prettiest nor the biggest but it is still a really big tooth to me. We also use a 3 inch tooth for the presentation but I did not photograph it. Pic 3 a 2 inch hastalis, a 2.5 inch hastalis, and one that I personally think is cooler than even Megalodon, a 2.54 inch Great White. It is blue. It just looks cool and I think 2.54 is pretty large for a white shark tooth. We wrap it up with questions from the kids while we go around the classroom handing out shark teeth to the students. If you happened to read all of these, you are a good soul because these are long winded posts I know lol Thank you to all who commented and offered encouragement. I will probably start putting up the marine mammal stuff next.
  17. Mammal tooth, Mastodon?

    Hey guys, I was thinking this was some sort of mastodon related baby tooth however I am now unsure. Right around 2" in diameter, 1.5" in width and maybe .75" in height. Thanks, corgi
  18. MIOCENE ISLAND

    I should have posted this long ago, but am going to do it now, in the hope that then it is behind me and then I can look forward to future adventures. Due to ill health from 2012, finances and responsibilities, I have been unable to do any personal collecting except for this one wonderful trip which reminded me that I've still got it in me. In October 2016 wifey and I were relaxing in a bar on Tarifa beach, the southernmost point in mainland Europe, located at the south-western corner of Spain, opposite Tangier, the two Pillars of Hercules that are the entrance to the Mediterranean from the Atlantic. I noticed an island connected to the mainland by a man made causeway. it had a lighthouse on and some ruins, so I thought that being only a little distance, I'd go and explore. Here is the location, to the left of the picture is the Mediterranean, to the right, the Atlantic. There are no more location pics, I'm afraid, as wifey can't be prised away from bars very easily and she has the camera phone, but the island was closed to visitors without a guide or permit as it's a place for protected birds, the lighthouse and Napoleonic fortress ruins. But to the left of the causeway was a small beach with exposed rocks and even a little notice board explaining that the rocks were a Miocene oyster bed 5 to 10 million years old. My interest was aroused so I clambered about the beach and found the fossils in the next post. Very pleased with myself, I was, especially as I had no tools and the rock was really seriously hard. Had to use other bits of rock as hammer and chisels. And my breathing held out pretty well. I can still do this! Life's Good.
  19. French Sand Dollars

    Recently I purchased France sand dollars from @Coco. See this thread http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/92032-diverse-french-fossils-to-be-sold/ The 5 Parascutella_producta arrived Tuesday safe and sound with well designed packaging. One was a double and Coco added a sixth that she had polished on her club's water based buffing machine. In addition, a bonus of a little sea urchin Arbacina monilis was unexpected. I was greatly pleased for an excellent transaction. Polished Parascutella_producta Arbacina monilis Now I must figure out how to remove the sand-limestone like Coco did. I have a friend who has a vast collection of echinoderms and asked for advice. He uses no mechanical device beyond water and a knife and he has cleaned thousands of fossils, which he shows off at Fossil Club shows. It seems that there is only a light covering of sand_limestone so I will try his method on one of my 5. In Process. I also have a dremel and a compressor-air blaster which I have never used. Maybe I will get to them. My thanks to Coco, for beautiful new additions to my collection. I'll put the one she polished in a riker box and see if I can match the beauty on one of the others. Jack
  20. Rapp beach

    Even though the tide sucks and it was difficult to get up early with dark cloudy skies, it is WARM (though the water lags behind), so I had to get out. The tide lines of shells had been spread out more evenly on the beach and I hoped to find stuff there. But first I walked the incoming tide with surprisingly little to show for it (three sand shark, one decent tiger shark and three shrimp coprolite burrows (still drying). Lots of small "whale bone" pieces. Also a flat piece with scales(?) almost painted with enamel, that is flaking off?? (I default always to turtle.) Walking the beaches I was disappointed; possibly the lack of sunshine and the black bits of leaves and wood just overwhelmed my teeth spotting abilities (i'm half blind). I decided to root around where I had found my half of a megalodon a few days ago, wishful thinking, and while no meg I found a nice 2" mako lying out in the open . Don't think it was there a few days ago. Hunted the rough stuff high on the beach hard but nothing else interesting. But the nice weather and mako and shrimp coprolites turned it into a decent two hour trip trip.
  21. Possible cetacean?

    Hi folks. I found this in a river in south Georgia where there are miocene/eocene fossils. Cetaceans are found here fairly regularly. The flat portion is broken in a weird way, but I'm thinking maybe this is part of a scapula? Thanks very much for looking at it.
  22. Rapp beach trips

    Have been trying to find shrimp coprolites at several beach sites. After a few good outings, have been coming up empty. Was looking forward to getting to a beach after our latest (unexpected) snow with a week of warm weather ahead. Of course the low tide is small this week and both am and pm are in the dark. And the wind which was predicted to be from the west (blow-out tide) was from the east (our low tide this morning was actually higher than high last week's full moon). So arrived early, tide coming in fast but no breeze and no "wash" along the beach. I found a mako and the partial winged fish(?) vert immediately but fairly soon could not reach the shell edge in my boots. Several walks up and down the beach water line yielded a few small teeth. There was a huge amount of stuff-- leaves, small black pieces of wood, lots of mostly oyster shells; visual overload!-- in tide lines deposited along the beach. I gave up on the wash and wandered around picking up some small pieces of whale bone, and discarding lots of rusted metal, and rock-like chunks with scallop impressions. I noticed something leaning against a bush far up on the beach (actually guessing skate plate) and found my 'best' megalodon tooth this year, split in two and tipped but about 3" (I had heard there were no megs on this beach from several friends, but I've found several pieces; maybe they meant no "whole megs". The oyster tongers and scallop dredgers get them, possibly that's why my tooth was broken cleanly in two.) Serrations are there but a bit worn. Not much, but still fun. The two makos are pretty but small, the others are small and worn. Given conditions I was very happy with the hunt, better than my last few outings.
  23. Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood, viewed under short-wave ultraviolet light Miocene Odessa, Delaware
  24. Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood, viewed under short-wave ultraviolet light Miocene Odessa, Delaware
  25. Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood, viewed under short-wave ultraviolet light Miocene Odessa, Delaware
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