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Found 13 results

  1. Hello, I want to put together some pics of some of the reef material that I have found in Streetsville, Mississauga, Ontario on the banks of the Credit River. It is now winter and I am missing the warm days in which I can go and wade in the warm waters of the river for fun. I just want to compile and share some specimens that whose photos I have not shared with. All the fossils belong to the Georgian Bay formation, Upper Member, which is late Ordovician in age. First is the common coral that displays an enormity of growth forms, Favistella alveolata (Goldfuss, 1826).
  2. Sliced and polished nautiloids

    More from the Etobicoke creek in Mississauga. Ive been slicing and polishing some worn down nautiloid fragments and they look pretty cool.
  3. Stromatocerium huronense

    From the album Georgian Bay Formation Outside of Toronto, Ontario

    Stromatocerium huronense (Billings, 1865) Late Ordovician stromatoporoid sponge. Found along the Credit River at Streetsville, Mississauga, Ontario. Collected as a loose specimen, most likely coming from the Stromatocerium reef of the exposure this came from. Georgian Bay formation, late Ordovician. There is a tiny Favistella alveolata coral colony growing on the edge of the specimen, perhaps this was a commensalistic relationship? Specimen is 12 cm long. However this species in the exposure where it came from can grow beyond a foot in diameter as mounds.
  4. Favistella alveolata

    From the album Georgian Bay Formation Outside of Toronto, Ontario

    Favistella alveolata (Goldfuss, 1826) Found as a loose specimen at an exposure at the Credit River on Streetsville, Mississauga, Ontario. Late Ordovician, Georgian Bay formation. A rugose colonial coral. Coral approximately 10 cm excluding extra matrix.
  5. Homotrypa sp. (streetsvillensis?)

    From the album Georgian Bay Formation Outside of Toronto, Ontario

    Homotrypa sp. (streetsvillensis?, Dyer, 1925) Georgian Bay formation, late Ordovician. Plate of unidentifiable bryozoa. Found as a loose specimen on an exposure on the Credit River at Streetsville, Mississauga, Ontario. Approximately 12 cm long and 10 cm wide. Comes from the Homotrypa streetsvillensis zone layer of fossiliferous limestone full of bryozoans. The layer is around 18 inches to 2 ft thick, as described by W.S. Dyer in his "Stratigraphy and Paleontology of the Credit River" on pg. 50.
  6. Stromatoporoid Growth Forms?

    Lately if you have seen some of the topics I've started, these trips revolve around an Ordovician reef I came across by the Credit River in Mississauga, Ontario. One of the few things I discovered while exploring these spots is that there are plenty of Stromatocerium sponges which I red is a stromatoporoid. My question is, can anyone lead me to any papers about the growth forms of Ordovician stromatoporoids? I have found specimens of stromatoporoids and from the way I see it, some of the specimens I found of the same species have different growth forms. Some have those things they call monticules on the surface, and some don't exhibit them at all. Instead these specimens exhibit cracks and splits on the surface of the organism with irregular bumps and overgrowths. I'd like to know what causes this. Some of these sponges, from what I have collected, colonize some pieces of Prismostylus on the top.
  7. When I found this fossil it has some green algal growth on it as I found it on the grass. The algae did not cover the entire fossil but is there some way I can remove the yellow coating of this fossil? I've been scrubbing it with a brush under running water for a while now and some of the dirt does come off.
  8. Yesterday, after countless trips and exploring at the same old spots on the Credit River in Mississauga, Ont., I finally mustered the courage to go and wade on the water to an isolated exposure out the Georgian Bay Formation at Streetsville, Mississauga. I wanted to collect fossils that were not worn out as these were all I was finding in my old spots. I have been setting my eyes on this exposure from the other side of the Credit River for some time now ever since I started collecting along the Streetsville area and it could possibly harbour fresh material. The temperature of the afternoon was around 16-20 degrees Celsius so the water was not chilly as I was expecting it to be. I crossed the water barefoot with the water reaching up my knees at this tributary that separated the exposure from the main path. The Credit has many tributaries flowing and where the these tributaries converged the river, many exposures can be found along these places. After crossing I reached the other side without slipping on the slimy bottom. The exposure had thin footing for exploration but I was able to walk back and forth without slipping onto the water.
  9. Favistella sp.

    From the album Georgian Bay Formation Outside of Toronto, Ontario

    Favistella sp. (alveolata or calicina?) coral from the Credit River near Streetsville, Mississauga. Georgian Bay Formation, Streetsville Member, late Ordovician. Found as a loose specimen by the banks of the Credit River. This colonial rugose coral is very abundant along the site with many small loose colonies. Some colonies can be found on a limestone matrix. Please click on image sizes to see details of the corallites.
  10. Side Views of the Prismostylus sp. Specimen

    From the album Georgian Bay Formation Outside of Toronto, Ontario

    Side view of the Prismostylus sp. specimen. Credit River near the Streetsville area, Mississauga, Ontario. Georgian Bay Formation, Streetsville Member. Late Ordovician.
  11. Prismostylus sp.. (huronense?)

    From the album Georgian Bay Formation Outside of Toronto, Ontario

    Prismostylus sp. found near Streetsville, Missisauga, Ontario by the banks of the Credit River. Top view of specimen. Georgian Bay Formation, Streetsville Member, late Ordovician, Katian. Formerly called Tetradium, this algae was very common to find in the locality I found this in. Small fragments of this algae can be observed on the limestone but I have seen some specimens that are wider than 20-25 cm in diameter. This specimen is a fragment and is around 15 cm at its widest point.
  12. Yesterday on April 24 I decided to go and visit a place in Mississauga, Ontario called Streetsville which used to be a township of its own before being joined to Mississauga to form the City of Mississauga. I took public transportation to get there and it took me about 1.5 hrs to get there. I went to the Credit River near Streetsville and explored the banks. I had trouble finding a natural exposure as all I was finding were banks with worn out rocks and silt. The river's bottom does not have the same clarity as the Humber River in Etobicoke as I could not see the shale bottom of river. All I was seeing at the Credit's bottom were worn out rocks, algae and silt. The river was also wider than the Humber and in some places it seemed deeper as well which made me think twice about crossing to reach this natural exposure I found. The banks mostly had worn rocks but some nice material can be found. I was surprised at the fauna I found. The rocks are still part of the Georgian Bay Formation but the fossils are completely alien to my eyes. They were nothing that I usually encounter at the Humber River or at Mimico Creek. The place was littered with small coral bits and there lots of what appeared to be Tetradium bits. There also many brachiopod hash plates around. This hash plate here has a piece of coral at the bottom along with many brachiopod bits. There were some things familiar to me like that hash plate of bryozoans and I only found one cephalopod fragment. Where I usually hunt cephalopods are very common to find in Mimico Creek and at the Humber River. There were also these odd trace fossils lying around.