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Found 51 results

  1. Illinois fossil ids

    The first one was found in randolph county outside of Sparta.
  2. My First Trip Plan!

    Hi everyone! I just researched and planned my very first hunt ever tonight. I'm from Minnesota, but am currently living in Mississippi for work. It took some time to find the information needed in order to pick a few possible locations without driving five or more hours. Here's what I've come up with for my trip plan. All of this will be river/stream sifting, or outcroppings from the rivers/streams. All three are options, but Merrill, MS is likely my first trip due to the fact two rivers from the North converge there possibly depositing older Cretaceous fossils as well. -Waynesboro, MS (2hr) Chickasawhay River — Catahoula Formation — Oligocene — 23my - 34.9my -Merrill, MS (1.25hr) Pascagoula River — Pascagoula and Hattiesburg Formation — Miocene — 5.3my - 22.3my -McLain, MS (1.25hr) Leaf River — Pascagoula and Hattiesburg Formation — Miocene — 5.3my - 22.3my Potential Recoveries Expected: Shark/Fish Teeth Shell Fragments Inverts Snake Vertebra Echinoids Others washed downstream from Cretaceous period Thanks for reading! -C
  3. Fossil ID

    Had a load of rocks put in driveway about a month ago and have discovered some really cool rocks and fossils. Found this one am would love to know what it is. Is beautiful in the sun sparkles in every open cavity.Thanks in advance. This is my first time so hope I am doing this right.
  4. Hello everyone, this is my first post so I’m hope Im posting this in the right place. I’ve been hunting Indian artifacts here in MIssissippi for a few years now. Mostly in creeks. Just started hunting a creek on my friend’s property in Yazoo Co, MS. It is a gigantic gravel creek, it’s a little overwhelming for artifact hunting. But the creek is a treasure trove of petrified wood of all sizes. Lots of agates also. That is one rock I can identify. I go in looking for artifacts and I come out with 40 pounds of wood in my backpack. I need some suggestions on how to polish this piece of wood I found a few days ago. I know nothing about polishing or petrified wood. In the picture below, the wood is wet but of course when it dries out it’s a lot lighter. If possible, I would like it to look how it looks when it is wet, color wise. I don’t want it to be to glossy. Just want it to be a little darker and bring out the details better. Any help would be greatly appreciated. I’m sure I will be asking more questions in the future, I’m finding a lot of rocks and other things that may be fossils but I am just not sure.
  5. Osteoderm fragment?

    Hey all, This piece was found in Frankstown, MS in Cretaceous sediment. It appears (at least to me) to be a fragment of an osteoderm, maybe crocodilian. Any thoughts? thanks!
  6. Fossil ID from franstoen WM Browning

    Hey thank you for allowing me to be a member of your group I recently took a trip to WM browning fossil Park which is in Northeast Mississippi near Tupelo and I found many sharks teeth a few shell molds but one of the fossils that I found is really baffling me into the come not really sure it’s a fossil at all. Can someone identify this? (Mostly curious about the one with the two sides and one line in the middle - but these are the ones I wasn’t sure about) Thanks!
  7. Hello! I found a mysterious fossil bone while looking for shark teeth in NE Mississippi this past weekend. I believe it is from the Eutaw Formation which is Late Cretaceous. This bone appears to be complete, although maybe a bit creek-worn. It is as hard as a chert creek rock with visible minerals present in the pores. Size is 2.75" long, by 2" wide, and around 1.5" thick (including the arches on the other side). I have not studied vertebrates, and have no idea how to technically describe bones, but it looks like the largest surface is a ball (like a ball/socket) and there are two areas on either side that look like contact points. If you turn it over, it is almost heart-shaped with another ball-type surface at the bottom of the "heart shape" and two concave areas on the sides (lots of mineral "stripes" in this area). At the top of the heart shape, there is a dovetail-shaped notch. I am more than happy to take additional photos if requested! I've scoured Google and can't find much to go by, but I am guessing that it is probably some kind of marine reptile or less likely, a dino that had washed out to sea. I know it is a stretch to be able to identify one lonely little bone, but I would love to know anything I can about it, no matter how general. Thanks everyone!!!
  8. Large fossil identification help

    These were found in a North MS creek. The cut of the creek is down to the hardpan and fifteen feet below ground level. There were numerous fractures on and beyond the exposed portions of the fossils. To accommodate for this and to maintain their integrity, both of them were removed along with hard pan, as a shelf. The smaller of the two fossils was found less than an inch away from the main body. As with the larger fossil, it was fractured and fell into four pieces--the nub, the main body, a shoot, and a tip--and these can be seen in the lower right and the upper left corners, respectively. Any help would be greatly appreciated and thank you in advance.
  9. Scapanorhynchus raphiodon tenaxus 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Scapanorhynchus tenaxus Shark Tooth SITE LOCATION: 30 miles north of Tupelo, Mississippi TIME PERIOD: Upper Cretaceous Period (ca 90,000,000 yrs ago) Data: Scapanorhynchus ("Spade Snout") is an extinct genus of shark that lived from the early Cretaceous until possibly the Miocene if S. subulatus is a mitsukurinid and not a sand shark. Their extreme similarities to the living goblin shark, Mitsukurina owstoni, lead some experts to consider reclassifying it as Scapanorhynchus owstoni. However, most shark specialists regard the goblin shark to be distinct enough from its prehistoric relatives to merit placement in its own genus. Scapanorhynchus had an elongated, albeit flattened snout and sharp awl-shaped teeth ideal for seizing fish, or tearing chunks of flesh from its prey. It was a small shark normally measuring about 65 cm, though the largest species, S. texanus, is thought to have reached up to 3 m (10 ft) in length, about the size of a modern goblin shark. The largest tooth ever found is 7 cm near Atlantic Ocean. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Lamniformes Family: Mitsukurinidae Genus: †Scapanorhynchus Species: †tenaxus
  10. Scapanorhynchus raphiodon tenaxus 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Scapanorhynchus tenaxus Shark Tooth SITE LOCATION: 30 miles north of Tupelo, Mississippi TIME PERIOD: Upper Cretaceous Period (ca 90,000,000 yrs ago) Data: Scapanorhynchus ("Spade Snout") is an extinct genus of shark that lived from the early Cretaceous until possibly the Miocene if S. subulatus is a mitsukurinid and not a sand shark. Their extreme similarities to the living goblin shark, Mitsukurina owstoni, lead some experts to consider reclassifying it as Scapanorhynchus owstoni. However, most shark specialists regard the goblin shark to be distinct enough from its prehistoric relatives to merit placement in its own genus. Scapanorhynchus had an elongated, albeit flattened snout and sharp awl-shaped teeth ideal for seizing fish, or tearing chunks of flesh from its prey. It was a small shark normally measuring about 65 cm, though the largest species, S. texanus, is thought to have reached up to 3 m (10 ft) in length, about the size of a modern goblin shark. The largest tooth ever found is 7 cm near Atlantic Ocean. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Lamniformes Family: Mitsukurinidae Genus: †Scapanorhynchus Species: †tenaxus
  11. marine fossils from Woodville, MS

    I found these near Woodville MS, which is near the tunica hills region. Two of the fossils appear to be pretty common around here and I suspect they are marine fossils (a crinoid, perhaps?). If anyone recognizes them I'd love to know precisely what they are. The remaining fossil is more perplexing. I've found lots of coral in the area but nothing that looks quite like this. It reminds me of the pulp of a fern tree or something but I'm wondering if it's not just a different species of coral. Thanks for your help!
  12. I'm hoping someone will have a pdf of some fossil shark papers by Gerald Case. I'm finding that many of his papers are in journals that my university does not have a subscription to. In particular I am trying to identify sharks/rays/fish that I picked from a bucket of Bashi Formation matrix (early Eocene) so the first paper is most useful to me. However there are others that cover other sites I have collected so I'll go for broke and hope someone has some of these they are willing to share. Case, G. R. 1994. Fossil fish remains from the late Paleocene Tuscahoma and early Eocene Bashi Formations of Meridian, Lauderdale County, Mississippi. Palaeontographica Abteilung A, 230:97-138. CAPPETTA, H. & CASE, G.R. (2016)A Selachian Fauna from the Middle Eocene (Lutetian, Lisbon Formation) of Andalusia, Covington County, Alabama, USA. Palaeontographica, Abt. A, 307 (1–6): 43 – 103 CASE, G.R. & BORODIN, P.D. (2000)Late Eocene selachians from Irwinton Sand Member of the Barnwell Formation (Jacksonian), WKA mines, Gordon, Wilkinson Country, Georgia. Münchner Geowissenschaftliche Abhandlungen, (A), 39: 5–16, 5 pl., 3 fig., 1 tabl. CASE, G.R. & BORODIN, P.D. (2000)A Middle Eocene Selachian Fauna from the Castle Hayne Limestone Formation of Duplin County, North Carolina. Münchner Geowissenschaftliche Abhandlungen, (A), 39: 17–32, 7 pl., 1 fig. CASE, G.R. (1987)Borodinopristis schwimmeri, a new ganopristine sawfish from the Upper Blufftown Formation (Campanian) of the Upper Cretaceous of Georgia. Bulletin of the New Jersey Academy of Sciences, 32 (1): 25–33, 6 fig. Thanks! Don
  13. Cretaceous Tooth

    Here is a tooth that I recently found at a Late Cretaceous site in North Mississippi, in the Coon Creek Formation. I really don't know what to think of it, except that it appears to have some sort of enamel. I haven't seen anything similar before, so I am asking for some extra opinions! Most material at this site is marine, but the occasional terrestrial botanicals and fragmentary dinosaur remains do poke up around North Mississippi. The tooth is roughly 3/4 cm. Of course, I am always hoping for dinosaur! @Troodon And teeth are his namesake! @Al Dente Front of tooth (my reference point is kind of arbitrary). I apologize for the matrix still on it, it is very tough and I don't want to damage the tooth. Back of Tooth Chewing surface
  14. Hi y'all, Nothing to spectacular to report just excited to have a place to hunt since a recent move. I did enough research to know about 20 mile creek but not to know there is an actual fossil park along it. So I picked a random bridge along the creek that appeared to have some exposed bars. I was pretty excited to find a few shark tooth shards as soon as I got below the bridge. My wife and I set out to get to the exposed bars we could see in the distance. Unfortunately these bars were mostly either entirely sand or clay with little gravel to speak of. At one point I slipped on a rock and went completely in the creek. LoL Later we incountered a rather aggressive snake(appeared to be a cotton mouth) despite it having half a rat or mouse hanging out of its mouth. Since there was a good bit of gravel under the bridge I went back to the car and grabbed the sifters. After sifting for awhile we did come up on some shark teeth, a gastropod, and what looks like maybe a piece of enchodus jaw bone. I will definitely be back. We topped off the day visiting the Shiloh battle field. Here are the pics below. The first being my finds and the second the wife's finds. Anybody have any other good creeks to recommend for fossils or points in NE MS? Thanks!
  15. A new ID please

    Hello all and thanks for all of your support on another ID that I asked for. I am very new to this so I read this site a lot before I ask any questions to learn as much as possible about my area of hunting. However, I do find things that are beyond my paygrade that I hope you can help with. The pics I uploaded are of what I am digging around. We had a big rain last week that washed off the big slab that I hunt beside. It is about 30 yards wide and about 100 yards long or so. The creek runs along the side of it and is a mostly sand bottom but sifting the sand is where I find coral, shark teeth and bone. Walking in I walk on the slab and I noticed about 8 randomly circles that were raised about an inch above the surface of the slab. They are the size of manhole covers pic 1. i followed them until I found one that had something I thought was a big oyster sticking out of it in pic 2. It has drilling type marks on the perimeter of the hole and the object stuck out about 3-4". I dug it out and it was what I have in pic 3. My searching has brought the answer to be between a concretion or an egg of some sort. The dimensions are about 13" from top to bottom and a circumference of 28" or so. It weighs around 30lbs. Any help would be appreciated.
  16. Basilosaurus Tooth?

    Any opinions on this tooth? Found in Yazoo County, Mississippi. It was found in a small creek approximately 1/2 mile into the hills from the delta. It measures 2 & 3/4" in length.
  17. Mississippi Cretaceous period

    I found the following samples today in northeastern Mississippi at the Cretaceous park site. I'm curious what the little fossilized designs in item 1 are. And I'm thinking item 3 may be a tooth of sorts? I also found this tooth and was wondering if it was a modern deer tooth, or fossilized something? Does anyone have any advice on how to tell?
  18. Tooth identification

    Found small tooth at Frankstown, 20 mile creek, Mississippi. Known as a Cretaceous outcrop. Tooth was mixed among shark teeth. Any ideas is appreciated.
  19. Frankstown, MS

    I went on my very first fossil hunt today in northern Mississippi. I was excited to find fossils, but I am having trouble identifying the following 4. Thank you in advance, I cannot wait to learn more about this wonderful hobby.
  20. Thinking bison tooth

    The larger one measures 2.5" long and 1.625" wide. The smaller one measures 1.5"X1.5". I found them separately on the same creek about 4-500 yards apart near Union Church Mississippi
  21. Any ideas

    52254436485__24236803-83A5-4AFF-9371-3E7AD75CA419.MOV
  22. Starnes, J. E., 2017, Excavation of a Fossil Whale Skeleton by MDEQ in Scott County. Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality Environmental News. vol. 14, no. 6, pp. 1-3. https://www.deq.state.ms.us/mdeq.nsf/pdf/Main_06_2017externaljune2017newsletter/$File/externaljune.pdf?OpenElement https://www.deq.state.ms.us/mdeq.nsf/page/Main_NewsletterArchive?OpenDocument Related Publications are: Johnston, J. E., 1991, Fossil Whale State Fossil of Mississippi. Office of Geology, Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality, Pamphlet no. 3 https://www.deq.state.ms.us/mdeq.nsf/pdf/Geology_Pamphlet3FOSSILWHALEStateFossilofMississippi/$File/Pamphlet 3.pdf?OpenElement Daly, E., 1992, A List, Bibliography And Index Of The Fossil Vertebrates Of Mississippi. Office Of Geology, Mississippi Department Of Environmental Quality, Bulletin 128. https://www.deq.state.ms.us/mdeq.nsf/page/Geology_Bulletin128-AList,BibliographyAndIndexOfTheFossilVertebratesOfMississippi?OpenDocument https://www.deq.state.ms.us/mdeq.nsf/pdf/Geology_Bulletin128-AListBibliographyAndIndexOfTheFossilVertebratesOfMississippi/$File/Bulletin 128.pdf?OpenElement Dockery, D. T. III, and K. Lightsey, 1997, Windows Into Mississippi’s Geological Past. Circular no. 6, Mississippi Office of Geology, Jackson, Mississippi. 68 pp. https://www.deq.state.ms.us/mdeq.nsf/page/Geology_Circular-WindowsIntoMississippi’sGeologicalPast?OpenDocument http://www.deq.state.ms.us/MDEQ.nsf/pdf/Geology_Circular-WindowsIntoMississippi’sGeologicalPast/$File/Circular 6.pdf Frazier, M. K. 1980. Archaeocetes: whale-like mammals from the Eocene of Mississippi. Mississippi Geology 1:1-3. https://www.deq.state.ms.us/MDEQ.nsf/pdf/Geology_Volume1Number2December1980/$File/Vol_1_2.pdf?OpenElement Uhen, M. D., 2008., Bibliography of Archaeocete Cetaceans https://paleobiology.si.edu/pdfs/archaeocete_bibliography.pdf Yours, Paul H.
  23. Mastodon

    Is this mastodon tusk and jaw?
  24. Photo: top left Found in a small (10ft wide) woodland stream near the LA/MS border, (East Feliciana Parish, LA/Wilkinson County, MS) within the Citronelle Formation; formed during the Pliostene. While the Citronelle is oft noted to contain fewer saltwater fossils than expected for an ancient coastal plain, this stream has provided probably 95% of the marine fossils in my collection. As a longtime rockhounder but fresh off the boat newbie to fossil identification, I've struggled to find a match for this fossil. (The photo is one I had on hand, am preparing to paint and the fossil is buried in chaos right now.) Betting this ID likely is child's play for most of you, any light you can shine on this fossil would be so very much appreciated. -caroline
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