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  1. sLast weekend I took a four day trip to Kentucky to see family; parents, sister, brother-in-law, and nephew. While there arranged to get together with Herb from the Forum to collect Mississippian Age fossils which I hadn't done before. There are no fossiliferous Mississippian Age deposits in New York and the nearest are in Western Pennsylvania hours away, so this looked like a good opportunity to add some marine fossils from that age to my collection. Fortunately where my family lives is in an area of marine Mississippian deposits. On the way to our rendezvous with Herb in E-Town (Elizabethto
  2. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral, with Druzy Quartz Warsaw, Missouri Mississippian Period (358.9 to 323.2 million years ago) This is an interesting specimen with druzy quartz on the bottom of the ancient fossil coral. In the central and southern Missouri region mostly is micro-quartz filled flint and chert stones laying about and this coral is similar stone. This stone is 34mm by 22mm by 20mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  3. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral, with Druzy Quartz Warsaw, Missouri Mississippian Period (358.9 to 323.2 million years ago) This is an interesting specimen with druzy quartz on the bottom of the ancient fossil coral. In the central and southern Missouri region mostly is micro-quartz filled flint and chert stones laying about and this coral is similar stone. This stone is 34mm by 22mm by 20mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  4. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral, with Druzy Quartz Warsaw, Missouri Mississippian Period (358.9 to 323.2 million years ago) This is an interesting specimen with druzy quartz on the bottom of the ancient fossil coral. In the central and southern Missouri region mostly is micro-quartz filled flint and chert stones laying about and this coral is similar stone. This stone is 34mm by 22mm by 20mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  5. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral, with Druzy Quartz Warsaw, Missouri Mississippian Period (358.9 to 323.2 million years ago) This is an interesting specimen with druzy quartz on the bottom of the ancient fossil coral. In the central and southern Missouri region mostly is micro-quartz filled flint and chert stones laying about and this coral is similar stone. This stone is 34mm by 22mm by 20mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  6. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral, with Druzy Quartz Warsaw, Missouri Mississippian Period (358.9 to 323.2 million years ago) This is an interesting specimen with druzy quartz on the bottom of the ancient fossil coral. In the central and southern Missouri region mostly is micro-quartz filled flint and chert stones laying about and this coral is similar stone. This stone is 34mm by 22mm by 20mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  7. Dpaul7

    Archimedes Bryzoan D

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Archimedes Bryzoan in Matrix Bangor Limestone Formation, North Alabama Mississippian Period c 325,000,000 years ago Archimedes is a genus of bryozoans belonging to the family Fenestellidae. The first use of the term "Archimedes" in relation to this genus was in 1838. This genus of bryozoans is named Archimedes because of its corkscrew shape, in analogy to the Archimedes' screw, a type of water pump which inspired modern ship propellers. These forms are pretty common as fossils but they have been extinct since the Permian. Archimedes is a genus of fenestrate bryozoans with a calcified
  8. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Conostichus - Sea Anemone Burrow Fossils SITE LOCATION: Cedar Creek Lake in Franklin County, Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 350,000,000 yrs old) Data: Conostichus is an ichnogenus of trace fossil. Conostichus was first described as a marine plant by Leo Lesquereaux, a famous paleobotanist (a student of fossil plants) in 1876 from specimens found in southern Illinois. Because of their radial symmetry, however, they have more recently been thought to be molds of crinoids or burrows of sea anemones. Specimens found in place
  9. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Conostichus - Sea Anemone Burrow Fossils SITE LOCATION: Cedar Creek Lake in Franklin County, Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 350,000,000 yrs old) Data: Conostichus is an ichnogenus of trace fossil. Conostichus was first described as a marine plant by Leo Lesquereaux, a famous paleobotanist (a student of fossil plants) in 1876 from specimens found in southern Illinois. Because of their radial symmetry, however, they have more recently been thought to be molds of crinoids or burrows of sea anemones. Specimens found in place
  10. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Archimedes with fronds, in Matrix SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation, northern Alabama. TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 350,000,000 yrs old) Data: The Archimedes is also termed moss animal, the Bryozoans are colonial animals that live as filter feeders, filtering nutrition from food through it's fenestrae, a screen-like structure that went around the axis of its screw-like central structure seen here. The Bryzoan Archimedes is named after its resemblance to Archimedes’ screw, a device invented by the
  11. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Archimedes with fronds, in Matrix SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation, northern Alabama. TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 350,000,000 yrs old) Data: The Archimedes is also termed moss animal, the Bryozoans are colonial animals that live as filter feeders, filtering nutrition from food through it's fenestrae, a screen-like structure that went around the axis of its screw-like central structure seen here. The Bryzoan Archimedes is named after its resemblance to Archimedes’ screw, a device invented by the
  12. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Barylasma ovale Coral SITE LOCATION: Fort Payne Formation, Limestone Co., Alabama. TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 350,000,000 yrs old) Data: This coral was a stationary epifaunal suspension feeder. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Order: †Stauriida Family: †Plerophyllidae Genus: †Barylasma Species: †ovale
  13. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Barylasma ovale Coral SITE LOCATION: Fort Payne Formation, Limestone Co., Alabama. TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 350,000,000 yrs old) Data: This coral was a stationary epifaunal suspension feeder. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Order: †Stauriida Family: †Plerophyllidae Genus: †Barylasma Species: †ovale
  14. Dpaul7

    Crinoids - Fifeocrinus Arms a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fifeocrinus Crinoid Arms SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Data: Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". Crinoids are characterised by a mouth on the top surface that is surrounded by feeding arms. They have a U-shaped gut, and their anus is located next to the mouth. Although the basic echinoderm pattern of fivefold symmetry can be rec
  15. Dpaul7

    Crinoids - Fifeocrinus Arms a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fifeocrinus Crinoid Arms SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Data: Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". Crinoids are characterised by a mouth on the top surface that is surrounded by feeding arms. They have a U-shaped gut, and their anus is located next to the mouth. Although the basic echinoderm pattern of fivefold symmetry can be rec
  16. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Bryozoans - Septopora subsuadrans Fossil Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period c 325,000,000 years ago Bryozoans are some of the most abundant fossils in the world. They are also widespread today, both in marine and freshwater environments, living at all latitudes and at depths ranging downward to at least 27,900 feet (8,500 meters). Septopora exemplifies the branching form of some bryozoan colonies. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Bryzoa Class: Stenolaemata Order: Fenestrida Family: Septoporidae Genus: Septopora Specie
  17. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Bryozoans - Septopora subsuadrans Fossil Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period c 325,000,000 years ago Bryozoans are some of the most abundant fossils in the world. They are also widespread today, both in marine and freshwater environments, living at all latitudes and at depths ranging downward to at least 27,900 feet (8,500 meters). Septopora exemplifies the branching form of some bryozoan colonies. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Bryzoa Class: Stenolaemata Order: Fenestrida Family: Septoporidae Genus: Septopora Specie
  18. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fossil Coral - Zaphrentis spinulosum Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 years old) Zaphrentis is a genus (sometimes made the type of the family Zaphrentidae) of solitary cup-shaped tetracorals that are common in Paleozoic formations and have numerous septa radiating from a deep pit in one side of the cup. Zaphrentis is one of the most widely used names in Paleozoic coral paleontology. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Order: Rugosa Family: Zaphrentidae Genus: Zaphrentis Species:
  19. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Scaphopods -Three LAEVIDENTALIUM Matrices Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period - (ca 325,000,000 years old) Dentaliida is one of the two orders of scaphopod mollusks, commonly known as elephant's tusk shells. The order Dentaliida contains most of the larger scaphopods, and is distinguished from the other order (the Gadilidae) by the shape of its shell (the Dentaliid shell tapers uniformly from anterior to posterior; the Gadilid one has an anterior shell opening slightly smaller than the shell's widest point), the shape of th
  20. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Scaphopods -Three LAEVIDENTALIUM Matrices Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period - (ca 325,000,000 years old) Dentaliida is one of the two orders of scaphopod mollusks, commonly known as elephant's tusk shells. The order Dentaliida contains most of the larger scaphopods, and is distinguished from the other order (the Gadilidae) by the shape of its shell (the Dentaliid shell tapers uniformly from anterior to posterior; the Gadilid one has an anterior shell opening slightly smaller than the shell's widest point), the shape of th
  21. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Scaphopods -Three LAEVIDENTALIUM Matrices Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period - (ca 325,000,000 years old) Dentaliida is one of the two orders of scaphopod mollusks, commonly known as elephant's tusk shells. The order Dentaliida contains most of the larger scaphopods, and is distinguished from the other order (the Gadilidae) by the shape of its shell (the Dentaliid shell tapers uniformly from anterior to posterior; the Gadilid one has an anterior shell opening slightly smaller than the shell's widest point), the shape of th
  22. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pseudorthoceras Cephalopod in matrix Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 years old) An extinct species of cephalopod. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Order: Orthocerida Family: Pseudorthoceratidae Genus: Pseudorthoceras
  23. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Brachiopods - Composita subquadrata Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Composita is a brachiopod genus that lived from the Late Devonian to the Late Permian. Composita had a smooth shell with a more or less distinct fold and sulcus and a round opening for the pedicle on the pedicle valve. Composita is included in the family Athyrididae (Order Athyridida) and placed in the subfamily Spirigerellinae. The Rhynchonellata is a class of Lower Cambrian to Recent articulate brachiopods that combines orders from w
  24. Dpaul7

    Archimedes Bryzoan.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Archimedes Bryzoan in Matrix Bangor Limestone Formation, North Alabama Mississippian Period c 325,000,000 years ago Archimedes is a genus of bryozoans belonging to the family Fenestellidae. The first use of the term "Archimedes" in relation to this genus was in 1838. This genus of bryozoans is named Archimedes because of its corkscrew shape, in analogy to the Archimedes' screw, a type of water pump which inspired modern ship propellers. These forms are pretty common as fossils but they have been extinct since the Permian. Archimedes is a genus of fenestrate bryozoans with a cal
  25. Dpaul7

    Phestia Wortheni.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Clam Fossil, Phestia Wortheni Bangor Formation, Northern Alabama Mississippian Period (325,000,000 years ago) Nuculanoida is an order of very small saltwater clams, marine bivalve molluscs in the subclass Protobranchia. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Nuculandia Family: Nuculanidae Genus: †Phestia Species: †wortheni
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