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Found 189 results

  1. Need ID Help please!

    I found this in a stream in central Missouri, USA. Not sure what it is... in the base it appears that a crinoid existed in it and that this may have been some sort of cap or stem from a crinoid- however I can't find any pictures of anything like this. Any help would be appreciated!
  2. Found in a creek in North Central Missouri USA The hollow portion looks much like a geode inside so maybe it isn't a fossil? Would like have best guesses please Thanks so much Sorry, the only Tape we have is in feet and inches
  3. A few days ago after searching our creek for fossil specimens I came across this sticking out of the leaves. It turned out to be larger than I expected, but it was getting dark so without a second thought I hastily yanked it from the ground and ran home with it. I cleaned it up a bit - all smug and pleased with my find. Then that evening I had the good fortune to read Robert Boessenecker’s excellent post about field notes. I’ve always thought fossils were awesome, and have collected them casually since I was little. I never put any real effort into learning more though. In the last few weeks I’ve only just scratched the surface and found myself among you good people because I couldn’t stop wondering what a certain fossil I had found was. You all helped me ID it, and it really started me on this whole fossil thing. Back to the fossil. I slapped myself upside the head and vowed to return to the site the following day. Luckily I knew exactly where it was located and there was the hole from where I had found the fossil so the lesson learned was much less painful than it could have been. 20 inches from the first hole I found this: Then things got interesting... After a few days of careful notes, digging, pictures, and some light prep: In the above picture they are arranged exactly as found. With north straight left of the picture and south straight right. North is also downhill and south is uphill. They were about 7 yards from the creek and I think pieces 1 and 2 were originally exposed by flooding. After some attempts at fitting them together here is the main base: The following picture is what I believe goes on top of the base. However I can’t get it to line up perfectly yet. All the pieces that have fit together fit very well, but since piece 5 was found uphill and behind/south of piece 4 it makes me think pieces 1 and 2 were originally above the base pieces and erosion caused them to be downhill from the buried pieces. Pieces 1, 2, and 5 fit together exactly. 7 could fit on top of 6 but not as perfectly as I can get the others to fit together. A few more detail shots. The only other thing in the excavation that was interesting so far was this specimen which I think may be a piece of Echinoid spine. It was underneath piece 4. I think it may be a species of Favosites, but further research on my part is needed. I’m still working on the stratigraphy of my area. I got lucky because the creek that I found it at is currently about to break its banks and flood the site. Hopefully I’ll be able to find some more pieces of the top section. I know it's a common fossil but I can’t wait to get back out there. I will update as I dig more!
  4. Burlington Formation trip

    The sun is exposed, snows melting, and many a birds chirping means it's nice enough to go scope out some Missouri Mississippian limestone! With the randomness of the weather this state gets, this is the first chance this year I've had to return to one of my favorite spots. This is one of many Burlington Formation exposures in Missouri. There are spots where the limestone consists of almost entirely crinoidal bits and pieces! Being the picky man I am, I mainly collect and prepare calyxs and brachs. Crinoids are king here, and will be by far the most common critter. They dominated the early shallow sea Missouri once was covered by. Its cool to see how many crinoidal bits some rock has just weathering away. There is about a good 12-16 feet (guesstimate) of the limestone currently exposed, much of remains underwater still. Eventually as time takes it toll, more pieces will weather, crumble, and eventually roll down hill. This area is constantly going above and under water. There is really no reliable time to hunt this spot, unless you know when water levels are low in the area. Rarely, one may find a nice crinoid calyx among the countless stems and other crinoid pieces. Usually they are pretty weathered like this one if they don't require any prep. Many of the calyxs found are just pieces, distorted, or crushed. It usually takes my eyes a hour or so before I can recognize calyxs quickly. I thought this chunk was cool. Its a heavily weathered calyx, with a small chunk of the stem at the base. I was shirtless today with it being the nice 60 degree weather. Seems Mr. Snake was enjoying it as well. That's all of the photos I got to take out at the lake. Finds coming soon when I'm home to take better pictures. I've only got a 30 minute drive from home, so here are the finds! I'll ID most of what I found later when I'm home with literature. I found a nice assortment of crinoidal calyxs, cups, plates, stems, and a few spines. Everything in the upper portion of the photo needs cleaned with some scribe/ abbrasive work. The rest should look good after I clean them with a pick, toothbrush, and warm soapy water. I also managed to pick up a nice rugose coral, a blastoid, a bryozoan, and a few brachiopods as well. March 3, 2020. My favorite find of the day And for those of you who like minerals, I found some nice calcite crystal as well. My favorite the honey color calcite Thanks for reading.
  5. Is This Petrified Wood?

    I've just started getting interested in fossils and started collecting ones I've found. I recently found what to me looks like petrified wood in a bag of pea gravel I got from Home Depot. Is this petrified wood? I've attached a picture of each side of the piece for help with identification. Thank you for the help!
  6. Hi Everyone, I recently broke open a rock on my property and found this interesting fossil. I have tried to identify it but can’t find anything that looks similar. I know it's a long shot for an ID, but more knowledgeable thoughts on what it could be would be very much appreciated. It was found in Missouri, Jackson County, north of highway 350, south of highway I-70, east of 435, and west of 470. The rock was dug out when digging a basement and subsequently cracked apart and the fossil was within. Basement location is atop glaciated ridge. I am guessing (serious amateur here) that the rock would be somewhere in the Late Pennsylvanian Stage? The red circle in this map below is the approximate location it was found. (http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Publications/Bulletins/83/07_up.html) Here are the pictures… Thanks in advance for any info!
  7. Seed Pod #4, Fruit cone Sycamore

    Here is another ID verification request. It was listed as - Fossil seed fruit cone, from a sycamore tree, Platanus occidentalis, Pleistocene, from Glacial Clay Formation in St. Louis County, Missouri. Is this correct? It's 32mm long.
  8. Please Help ID

    I found a cave recently, located about 30 feet above a creek on a hillside. Inside the cave I found a chunk of sediment, hardened into a sort of conglomerate. I split open the rock and inside found this. I have no idea what it is, thinking maybe a seed of some sort. Also in the conglomerate were crinoids and clam shell fossils, so this stuff seems old to me. I am located in central Missouri, USA and would really appreciate your help in identifying what this is. It is just over 1 inch in length (25.4 mm) and about 1/4 inch thickness (6.35 mm). On one side, there is a sort of indention that still has some of the conglomerate material in it. The side pictured is what I consider the front and is not the side with the indention and conglomerate, just to clarify.
  9. Shell stienkern

    South central Missouri. Probably gasconade formation but possibly eminence formation (late Cambrian)
  10. What could it be?

    I found this in the creek bed near the Mississippi River in Northeast Missouri. The size is about equivalent to a milk jug. Thanks for looking!
  11. Early Ordovician fossils

    These are pretty rough fossils. I haven't found a decent specimen yet, but ive ran into a few of them the last few months. Most likely gasconade formation (earliest bed of Missouri Ordovician ) cephalopods are a guess but I'd like your opinion. Are they known in 480 million year old tropical seabeds? Im not familiar with the details. Give me the run down on these fellas.
  12. Central Missouri

    Found a few beautiful pieces in rocks dug up by the local water department.surface exposure is Gasconade dolomite so i assume these are actually late Cambrian. But im not sure how deep in the ground they came from. Either way. I love these rocks and thought I'd share them with you. A lot of the pictures are different angles of the same rock. But theres a few of a second rock. I think i found and cleaned 4 rocks. Just didnt get pictures of all of them. Hope you enjoy. Happy hunting.
  13. Found in a field in Southeast Missouri

    My boys found this rock containing what looks like multiple fossils to me. Just looking for any info I can give my boys. Doesn't need to be too detailed. Ages 6 to 11. Thanks!
  14. Hey All, I don't know if there is even enough of a fossil here to identify. I am nowhere near good enough to give a real good guess. First thought was either a small piece of a cephlapod or chiton. If it is a gastropod, it is a type that I have never found before. It was found on the side of a dry creek bed near Willow Springs, Missouri, USA in an Ordovician Formation. The remnant that remains measures 13mm wide by 15mm long. The bed the fossil remnant is laying is measures 24mm long. There is an indented type of division going horizontally across the fossil. It does not go all the way through to make the remnant two separates segments though (just an indentation type of division line). Other fossils in the same rock include gastropods, a brachiopod and what looks like a very worn rugose coral. If anyone can give me a probably identification, I would appreciate it.
  15. Bryozoa or something different?

    Hi All, I picked up this rock in my back yard a couple of days ago. I picked it up because I saw a couple cross sections of rugose coral and some fenestrate bryozoan fossil pieces. When looking at it later, I noticed this feature. I haven't found anything like this before. Is this just a different type of bryozoa? These little marks also look like some tiny Platycrinite crinoid pieces. This was found in Howell County, Missouri, USA. It came from the Ordovician Period. These lines measure approximately 23mm in length and measure approximately 0.79mm wide. The individual spots are oval in shape and measure approximately 0.38x0.79mm. I don't know if it shows well in the first image, but this feature appears to be in a fracture in the host rock. There is still some rock covering the feature in the fracture. Any assistance or direction that you can give me is greatly appreciated. Thanks for your time, Doug
  16. Tooth ID

    Found this on a sandbar in Mississippi River near St. Charles Missouri, after the main channel was dredged. Appears to be a tooth but not like a canine type tooth. I was thinking shark tooth, maybe a native american trade piece. Any help would be greatly appreciated in identifying it.
  17. Please help ID this little guy

    Hello folks. I'm back after an extended break. I've found some really cool fossils on my land in southern Missouri, Texas county, USA. Just a few miles south of cabool. A seasonal stream flows through my land exposing some cool finds, not to mention- the heavy rains are washing the topsoil away. From the hundreds of artifacts I've collected, this spot must have been an indigenous settlement. My best guess is that this item was in the hands of those early Americans. I can see why, this is my 2nd most favorite of the collection. Please help me identify what this is. Any help would be greatly appreciated. FYI, I have overcast skies at the moment and very limited internet access. These pics are the best I can do. Mm measurements are roughly 66mm x 38mm x 25mm
  18. This might be a subject that might have been discussed before. If it has, I am sorry. I was looking at a rock that I found that has multiple flat gastropods in the matrix. I noticed that some spiral clockwise and other spiral counter clockwise. I have done a little research on this and I am confused. Some sites talk about the different spiraling depends on whether it was north or south of the equator. Another site talks about one being a gastropod fossil and the other being a gastropod like fossil. This is not the case of a fossil and a mirrored imprint. Do I have two different species here or is it just a variation (similar to color variations on certain herps)?
  19. I am assuming that this feature is just geology, but I would like a second opinion on this if possible. My eyes do wonders at seeing what I want to see instead of what is actually there. Thank you. This was found in Douglas County, Missouri, USA in the Roubidoux Formation. The feature in question measures 84x31mm. The host rock is 20x12.5cm. It was found near a seasonal creek bed where gastropods, rugose coral and crinoids have been found. Numerous trace fossils have been found in the area also. Thank you for your time and help.
  20. I am really trying to learn my common invertebrate fossils. Can someone, once again, confirm my tenative identification, or correct me? I really appreciate it. The fossil in question is this oval fossil. After doing some research my guess is it is a crinoid of some sort. I am guessing that the little "nipple" in the center of the oval is where the normal hole is, but why does it have a line disecting the oval into two distinct parts? If it is not a crinoid, can someone please tell me what I am looking at, and where I went wrong on my identification? Thanks, Doug
  21. Missouri Cambrian

    Just wanted to share this lovely old shell i had the pleasure of luck to find. It has been identified as taneospira emenensis from the eminence formation of Missouri upper Cambrian. I hope you enjoy seeing it. Happy hunting.
  22. Once again, I am studying and working on my own identifications. I am just needing someone to either confirm or correct me on this one. My first guess when I saw it was it was a gastropod of some sort, but after researching and looking at images online, my guess is that it is an internal cast of a hyolith. It was found in northwest Howell County, Missouri, USA. The fossil in question measures approximately 16mm and the host rock measures 80mm across. The widest point across of the cavity where the fossil in question lies is 8mm. Once again, I am truly appreciative of any help that you are willing to give me. Doug
  23. First point, I cannot get a decent image of this fossil to save my life. That being said, I took a bunch of sub par image in hopes someone can put the pieces together to come up with an id. It measures approximately 35x22mm and is definitely a different material than the host rock. I found it in the same area that I have been finding all of my other fossils. This is outside Willow Springs, Missouri, USA. I originally thought it might be a rugose coral of some sort, but it looks to have horizontal segments or something similar. I am about 95% (or more) positive that it is a fossil and not just geology. I will continue working on attempting to get better images. If I do, I will add them to the thread. Thank you for your assistance.
  24. Crystalized fossil or a pipe dream?

    I have a rock feature that I am a bit doubtful, but hopeful about. I have a few "crystalized" fossils and have seen some very nice ones from near my hunting area also posted. This does mean that there are some out there. This little feature measures almost 11mm long and is 6mm wide. In hand, the left side really looks like a head segment of some sort with the line and what does look like two eye spots. The main area has what looks like segment end features going around the sides. The square crystal feature in the center is a totally new one for me. I have found literally hundreds, if not thousands of crystal specimens (mostly in the quartz family) and have never seen anything like this. This rock has several other fossil and fossil imprints in it. There are cephlapod fossils, rugose coral fossils, and other features that I am still researching. Researching and using the state geological map, it was found in a late ordovician period area. It was found outside of Willow Springs, Missouri, USA. My hopes are that it is a trilobite fossil of some sort or an isopod fossil. I am NOT getting my hopes up real high though.
  25. Hi everyone, I found a rock that has multiple small gastropod fossils and gastropod impressions in it. When looking at it a little closer, I saw this grouping of three fossils. Two are gastropods, but I am unsure of the third. Is it also a gastropod that still has the host rock over it where it has not eroded or is it something different? The scale is in millimeters. This was found outside of Willow Springs, Missouri, USA and is a surface find in disturbed soil. Once again, thank you for taking the time to help a rookie learn. I appreciate it. Doug
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