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Found 263 results

  1. Egg? Possibly?

    I found this along a creek here in Southeast Missouri. It looks like a fossilized egg. What do you think? I searched the site for egg with no results.
  2. Fossil? Egg?

    I’m new to the whole artifact and fossil hunting and actually forum posting! I would like to get opinions on this following find. It was found in a creek in SE Missouri. And any pointers on hunting and identifying would be greatly appreciated. Thank you
  3. Middle Pennsylvanian Nautiloid?

    I recently got to do some hunting in northern Missouri, Marmaton group and found a few large phosphatic concretions. Within one was this specimen that I am trying to identify. I am wondering if it looks like a Solenochilus sp. to anyone beside me? There may not be enough of the specimen present to determine a species ID, but I figured I'd take a shot for the sake of labeling. Thanks,
  4. Burlington Formation fossil ID

    Hey all, when I was out fossil hunting today in the Burlington Formation, I found this odd little thing. I'm pretty confident it's a fossil, but I'm really not quite sure what it is. I really don't even know where to guess on this, any ideas?
  5. Hello! I have been cracking open a few more concretions from Muncie Creek and I cracked open this bizarre fossil! I know braincases have been found in these nodules since I have found a braincase of Lawrenciella, and donated a braincase that was found to have parts of the upper jaw! My main reasoning for asking if this is a braincase is that it has a few bizarre structures I have not seen in other concretion fossils. The chance that it is an ordinary bone is very much a possibility. on the left you can see that there are these repeating structures Here is a more zoomed in image. Here is the image zoomed out for refrence. Below are images of the bizarre round patterns that are visible on the fossil Some general info on the area: Location: Missouri Timer period: Pennsylvanian Formation: Muncie Creek Shale member Size refrence:
  6. Hello! I was cracking open some more phosphate nodules from the Muncie creek shale formation and had these stored in my room for a while! I was wondering if anyone could identify these very hard to determine fossils as I cannot tell if they contain bone fragments or if the fossils are from a coprolite! I think the one on the bottom right could be a either bone or coprolitic material More images of the specimen on the left which I believe is either fish excitement or fish vomit, I am unsure as I have found similar fossils to this inside some other nodules. Unsure what this one is as well! Any guess is welcomed! Location is in Missouri The area is dated to the Pennsylvanian Formation is the Muncie Creek Shale member
  7. Hey there, I hope today was as nice for you as it was for me outside here in Henry County, Missouri. On my day off today, I decided to go on another fossil hunt. Today's location is a little arm off of Truman Lake, and is one of my favorite spots to look for crinoids. The water was relatively low right now at this location today also. I decided to take advantage of that fact and look along the bottom by the water line where scraps and eroding peices fall down, and get covered back by water for most of the year. Often times I'll find complete crinoids and blastoids down here if the water is low enough, and one's luck is high. Today was a decent day for this picky fellow. The morning started off a bit cloudy, which was nice because I have a bit of a walk before I can start scouring for fossils on the ground. Soon after starting my trek, this cute little bug landed on my hand. I think it is a mayfly. Bugs can be annoying, though this little guy wasn't. Today was particularly bad with mosquitoes though. Lazy me forgot to bring bug spray. Be prepared for ticks, mosquitoes, and other creepy crawlies when coming out here. After getting to the fossiliferous limestones, I started off by going towards the bottom of the exposure. I tend to squat down sumo style, or look like I'm doing toe touches with my butt sticking in the air a good portion of the day while looking. One's success is often due to experience here, but alot of things are small, dirty, weathered, or just easy to overlook here. It definitely pays to take your time and go low when you look. There is always at least one fisherman or kayaker usually baffled by what I'm doing, today was no different. The first find was an easy to spot crinoid, which was perfect and required no preparation at all. Sometimes its as easy as just picking it off the floor. Very lucky to say the least. All that was needed was cleaning with warm soapy water. Can you spot the crinoid in situ? The second find was just as easy! A hundred feet away or so, this blastoid was just sitting there. Again, this only needed very simple cleaning up. Here is another photo, showing how I found it next to my trusty old Estwing. There are some cherts in the Burlington Formation, as well as the crinoidal limestones already shown. I didn't find too much in the cherty sections today. It always takes scribe and abrasives to prep this material. Sometimes you can whack the chert and the fossil will pop out, but depending how it's situated in the rock and also just dumb luck depends on weather that extraction method is successful. It usually isn't, and it can be dangerous as the chert can splinter out and shoot at high speeds if you hit the rock wrong. I did find a nice Pentremites sp. blastoid though, as well as a nice Composita sp. brachiopod in cherts. It is likely complete, but not one I can just whack. Heres another blastoid, though a different type from the crinoidal limestones that needs prep. It will be much easier to finish. After a good 5 hours out, I decided to return back to my car and head for home. I won't have many opportunities to hunt my beloved Burlington much longer, so I'm trying to make the best of this and go out as often as I can. I tend to be at peace most when I'm out in nature, and finding fossils has taught me more than just about these ancient creatures. It has taught me about my current surrounding environment, the current living creatures here, patience, and more that I probably don't need to ramble off about. Anywho, here's everything I managed to clean up today. Preparation on the blastoids will have to wait until I have more time. Composita sp. brachiopod Azygocrinus rotundus and Globoblastus norwoodi Other crinoidal bits. Another Globoblastus norwoodi (needs abbraided still) Crinoid (probably Aorocrinus parvus, still needs prep) And that ends today's trip, thanks for reading. Enjoy your summer while you still can!
  8. Hello! I have found a few ferns at a road-cut and was wondering if anyone could identify these ferns below! I have found trilobites (small), Neuropteris fern leaves, many Calamites, and ocean invertebrates in the area. I was very lucky to find these plant fossils as they appear to be relatively uncommon in the road cut area! Specimen #1: I found this lovely leaf with a few imprints of fern fossil right next to it! (3.5cm) Specimen #2: A lovely... Ginkgo? I had posted this previously on a different website and noted it looked like a Gingko. I was not sure as the leaf has a more rounded edge and not a split edge like the Ginkgo I saw online Nevertheless it could be a squished Ginkgo or a related species! Specimen #3: A lovely leaf and one of my largest that I was able to find (5.3cm) Specimen #4: A beautiful fern fossil leaf (3.4cm) Some general information I was able to gather from the area! Time period: Pennsylvanian Location: Missouri Formation: Upper Winterset Limestone Thanks to Missourian For the possible Formation ID
  9. Calamite #2

    From the album Missouri Plant Fossils

    One of my favorite Calamites due to how well preserved its internal anatomy is! I gave this to a friend's little brother who loves fossils.
  10. Neuropteris Sp.

    From the album Missouri Plant Fossils

    One of my favorite finds comes in at roughly 2.8cm and has two beautiful leaves next to each other!
  11. Neuropteris Sp.

    From the album Missouri Plant Fossils

    Large Leaf with a few smaller leaf imprints from Alethopteris, sp
  12. Cyclopteris Sp.

    From the album Missouri Plant Fossils

  13. Possibly Cyclopteris, Or Neuropteris Sp.

    From the album Missouri Plant Fossils

    This specimen is roughly 5.3Cm!
  14. From the album Muncie Creek Shale Nodules

    Got lucky and found this while cracking open phosphatic nodules!
  15. Multiple Petalodus Teeth Fragments

    From the album Chondrichthians

    The more flattened version and 3 extra fragments from another Petalodus
  16. Multiple Petalodus Teeth Fragments

    From the album Chondrichthians

    A few Petalodus teeth fragments I have found
  17. Shark Dorsal Spine? ( Missouri )

    Hello and good evening! I have passed this fossil a few times and it resides in a large limestone slab. I believe it could be a spine due to presence of Chondrichthyan teeth in the area and how it appears to come to a point. For reference the teeth I have found include teeth from Petalodontiformes, Eugenodontida, and other Chondrichthyans. I will note I have found some petrified wood in the area, but none in a limestone matrix so it could be a Calamite. Location: Missouri Time period: Pennsylvanian Formation: Muncie creek shale member
  18. Location: Missouri Time period: Pennsylvanian Formation: Muncie Creek Shale Specimen 1: Fish Coprolite? 1.8cm (nodule size) Specimen 2: Coprolite? 2cm (nodule size) Specimen 3: Fish Mandible? (2.6cm) Specimen 4: Coprolite or Maybe Braincase (I think it is very unlikely that it is) 2.8cm Nodule size 1.5cm (fossil size) Specimen 5: (2.9cm) Note: The placement of the fossilized material might be wrong as this was one of my first nodules and the fossilized material fell out. I recovered what I could. (Opened roughly 2 months ago) Specimen 6: Tessellated Cartilage with some Skin impressions ? (2.5cm) Specimine 7: Fish material? Thank you for reading and viewing this, I hope I can better understand these images so I can use them as references in the future!
  19. Location: Missouri Geological time period: Pennsylvanian Formation: Muncie creek shale I believe it is some sort of cartilage or fish material but I honestly have no clue.
  20. Deltodus sp. Tooth (Top View)

    From the album Chondrichthians

    Any Id's or corrections are welcomed! Correct id by Jackson g
  21. Petalodus sp. Tooth

    From the album Chondrichthians

    Roughly 50 mm in size!
  22. Hamiltonichthys Tooth

    From the album Chondrichthians

    Often these teeth are not widely reported and this specimen is 7mm in size
  23. Hamiltonichthys Tooth Close Up

    From the album Chondrichthians

    Specimen is 7mm in size. I was told this could be Hamiltonichthys after posting it to fossilId
  24. Unidentified Possibly Cochliodus

    From the album Chondrichthians

    One of my teeth that I really want to identify. It was mentioned it could be a broken or partial Petalodont crown minus the root. 13cm in size
  25. Assumed Orodus Tooth

    From the album Chondrichthians

    I assumed due to there being multiple guesses on the fossilId section and this one best fit the description It is roughly 7mm in size It could also be a juvenile of a Petalodont but that is my theory
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