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Found 186 results

  1. So I was rooting again around in the garage and found a couple plates I had bought a few years back and never tracked down an ID for. Tentative provenance was Paleocene from Montana. I found this article recently and was wondering if it could be one of the genera/sp described or one of the other genera mentioned in the discussion section. Trapa, Trapago, Fortuna, Quereuxia. STOCKEY, R. A., AND G. W. ROTHWELL. 1997. The aquatic angiosperm Trapago angulata from the Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) St. Mary River Formation of southern Alberta. Int. J. Pl. Sci. 158: 83-94. Can be found here: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/240563741_The_Aquatic_Angiosperm_Trapago_angulata_from_the_Upper_Cretaceous_Maastrichtian_St_Mary_River_Formation_of_Southern_Alberta I also was looking at the USGS pub 375 https://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/0375/report.pdf My plates have a number of leaflets and fragments with very little venation visible and in a pale gray and a light pink color in a very fine matrix.....Many of the leaflets have small teeth... Plates: Crenulations Leaflets and partial venation Anyone have any expertise in these? Looks like the authors were indicating more study is needed in this area of aquatic plants--that was 20 years ago. Any help is appreciated. Thanks! Regards, Chris
  2. Tiny Hell Creek Theropod Tooth

    I just found this little tooth for sale. It is from the Hell Creek Formation in Montana and is 5/16" long. Assuming that includes the fake root, by measuring on my screen it appears to actually be 3/16" long along the distal edge. Serrations then are about 9 per 1/16" distal and 13.5 per 1/16" mesial and look more rod-like than chisel-like to me. There are no ridges on the sides, so it's not Acheroraptor. Could it be Dakotaraptor? This species has been #1 on my list for a while and I would love to have this in my collection if it is Dakotaraptor.
  3. Is this a genuine Triceratops frill fragment? It is from Hell Creek, MT. The seller has other frill pieces that look similar, along with other dino teeth. From what I've read in other posts, it sounds like presence of blood grooves confirm identity as a triceratops frill. I don't see overt grooves on the planar surface but I see evidence of a thin spongy bone layer in the cross section suggesting to me it is still bone of some sort. Thanks for any assistance.
  4. Crocodile Osteoderm

    From the album Judith River fm. Fossil Finds

    Here's the second piece of crocodilian osteoderm I found in Montana in the summer of 2017. It may also be from Leidyosuchus.
  5. Crocodile Osteoderm

    From the album Judith River fm. Fossil Finds

    This osteoderm may belong to Leidyosuchus.
  6. Tyrannosaurid Tooth Tip

    From the album Judith River fm. Fossil Finds

    Here we have the tooth tip from a Tyrannosaurid I found at a microsite in Northern MT. Teeth, especially fragmentary ones like these are nearly impossible to identify accurately as the differences between those of Gorgosaurus and Daspletosaurus (the two species of tyrannosaur from the JRF) are difficult to distinguish.
  7. Help with interpreting fossils

    Hi, Brand new to the site. Any help would be appreciated. I am a 6th grade Science teacher in suburban St. Louis. About 8 years ago I attended a dig with the St. Louis Science center to the Hell Creek formation outside of Jordan, Montana. I brought several fossils home to use in my classroom. I would love to get more information about them. My students absolutely love hearing about them and the more details the better! The first set of images was identified as being part of Triceratops frill. I can see the blood grooves in the bone. There also appears to be fossilized blood vessels on the surface of the bone. One starts at one side of the frill, travels through the frill and comes out the other side. Can blood vessels fossilize? Am I interpreting that correctly? Also on the "back" side of the fossil there appears to be a lot of dark almost granular material. At first I thought it was something organic (lichens) from the site where I found it. It is definitely fossilized and not something I can scrape off. Any ideas what that is? The second fossil is still unidentified. I was not able to get information about it on our trip from the paleontologist. Any information would be awesome! Thank you!
  8. Not to long ago I got a gorgosaur tooth as shown on my other post strange juvenile gorgosaurus tooth when I was studying it I did some research to make sure it’s a gorgosaur tooth I found out there are ways to indentify tyrannosaur teeth from Canada and Montana the main way is the cross section if the cross section is fat more like a circle it’s a despletosaurus if it’s more skinnier more oval shaped it’s a gorgosaur also another way is the size if it’s more then 3 inches it’s despletosaurus if it’s 3 inches or less it’s probably a gorgosaur or a small despletosaurus tooth the top tooth is a despletosaurus then the cross sections the first cross section is a despletosaurus see it looks more like a circle then the gorgosaur more of a oval then the gorgosaur tooth
  9. Collection of a new member

    Hello everyone, New member from Minnesota, post my intro in the member introduction forum. The first is my Minnesota fossils. From the Cannon Falls and Rochester area from Ordivician period. The first is a Cephalopod from Rochester. One other from Minneapolis area from Ordivician. Apologies but most of it is unprepped at the moment Will have to post images in multiple posts. The Second will be my collection from Iowa. I have stuff from Montana that I will post in a different thread.
  10. It is 47 cm in length and has a little restoration. It is from the Hell Creek formation in Montana.
  11. Troodon (Stenonychosaurus?) Tooth

    From the album Judith River fm. Fossil Finds

    This Troodon tooth is one of my favorite fossils in my whole collection. I found this at a microsite in Northern MT in the summer of 2017.
  12. Caridosuctor populosum Lund & Lund, 1984

    From the album Vertebrates

    Caridosuctor populosum Lund & Lund, 1984 Heath Shale Formation Early Carboniferous Serpukhovian Bear Gulch Montana USA
  13. Hell Creek Vertebra ID

    Looking for a little help identifying this Hell Creek vertebra I purchased a few years ago. I bought it off an individual with lots of experience hunting in Hell Creek, but unfortunately he had no idea what it might be from. Any help would be much appreciated!
  14. Hello i bought this triceratops tooth a while ago and was just double checking its authenticity. Is it real? Thanks. -Tom
  15. I need an ID for this clam. I found this clam in a concretion. it was taken from the Kevin member of the Marias formation. Th Kevin member is listed as Santonian Cretaceous. The location is 5 miles west of Loma Montana.
  16. What kind of Brachiopod is this?

    I found this brachiopod as float on the side of the road. It was very near the transition of Devonian to Mississippian Lodgepole Formation in Little Belt Mountains, in Montana. The fossils is large. I'm thinking it might be a spiriferida.
  17. Leptaena

    I collected this Leptaena brachiopod from the red brown mudstone resting three feet above the top of the first out crop of breccia limestone. The location is above the rest-stop on highway 89 S before Riceville Rd. The formation is the lower part of the Kibbey. Leptaena Brachiopods dominate along with three types of bryozoa and crinoids. Also found clams and a part of a plant fossil. The setting was once a lagoon.
  18. Looking for Id on possible bone

    Hey there I was prepping a plate of Baculites when I noticed what looking like a bone. At the time int was hidden under a crust of calcite. After removing the calcite I now need to gather ideas on what kind of bone this maybe. So, I am looking for some ID help.
  19. Reticycloceras sp.

    With soft part preservation. Lit.: Landman, N. H., and R. A. Davis, 1988. "Jaw and crop preserved in an orthoconic nautiloid cephalopod from the Bear Gulch Limestone (Mississippian, Montana)." Mapes, R. S. 1987. "Upper Paleozoic cephalopod mandibles: frequency of occurrence, modes of preservation, and paleoecological implications". Journal of Paleontology 61: 521-538.
  20. Can also be found in Mazon Creek. Lit.: F. R. Schram (1979): Worms of the Mississippian Bear Gulch Limestone of central Montana, USA. Transactions of the San Diego Society of Natural History. Volume 19, No 9, pp 107-120
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