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Found 206 results

  1. Bone ID - very specific shape

    Another find in Glendive, MT. This piece was found along with other shattered pieces of bone and we jacketed them together. I am slowly working to reconstruct, and this is the biggest whole piece I have. The shape is so specific, I am curious as to if anyone knows at least where in the body this bone was (arm, leg rib, ect) I'd appreciate it! And if you know even more, all the better! Thanks for looking
  2. Damaged bone or horn core?

    Good afternoon! I am a beginner collector and last summer I went on my first dig in Glendive, MT. I don't know the age of the rock we were digging in, but we found some fragments to cast and this piece was found under all those as we dug them out, so it was kind of by itself. We did a very quick search around the area and didn't find anything else. I notice this piece is kind of conical, but I didn't know if that shape was due to damage or if it was a horn. It's in real rough shape, very crumbly, and there is still some plaster on it you can see in a couple pictures (as well as super glue from a bad repair I attempted). There is definitely some marrow on the inside but the outside is badly split. Some groves present Any info or guesses is appreciated. Someday I hope to be as knowledgeable as you all!
  3. Hadrosaur Humerus Repair/Prep

    I recently got this lovely mess of bone, which is a mostly complete hadrosaur right humerus that only requires some assembling. I actually bought this with the idea that it might be a fun project. But then it broke even more in the shipping. So I have my work cut out for me. It's from Judith River formation, Montana. It's hard to tell at the moment, but it seems to be a rather slender humerus. So that would make it more likely to be from the saurolophinae subfamily. But I will look into that some more when I have it assembled. So I will be doing lots of reassembling on this piece as well as prepping away some excess matrix that's still present. Besides the obvious problems, the bone itself is actually in very nice condition with some really smooth cortical bone as well as some lovely visible muscle scars. This is how it looked when I first opened it. Quite a mess. Also a drawing of what it should look like in context. And here I have slightly ordered the pieces. There's 5 big main pieces, three medium pieces and a whole bunch of tiny chunks. One of the bigger pieces that includes the ulnar and radial condyles. The shaft of the bone has had a pretty bad recent fracture. This is also where most of the smaller pieces come from.
  4. Why Does the U.S. Army Own So Many Fossils?

    Why Does the U.S. Army Own So Many Fossils? Turns out massive flood control projects are a great way to find dinosaurs. by Sabrina Imbler, Atlas Obscura, August 7, 2019 https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/why-does-the-army-own-dinosaurs Yours, Paul H.
  5. These finds were reported a while back and this paper describes the finds. These two partial skeletons from Montana represent the northernmost occurrences of Stegosauria within North America ever recovered from the Morrison Formation http://app.pan.pl/article/item/app005852018.html
  6. I just wrapped up my awesome 3 week fossil hunting trip with Paleoprospectors and I'm excited to get home and share more of my finds with everyone. It was an ambitious undertaking on my part as I would be out fossil hunting in hot and dry conditions for such an extended amount of time with no parents within a thousand mile radius, that's not to say I wasn't looked after and I'd like to thank all of the staff and participants that accompanied me during this excursion. Tonight I'll share with you the pictures and stories from the last three days of my time in Montana. Wednesday involved a lot of hiking and not a lot of production in terms of fossil finds, my best finds included a shred of theropod tooth, a small fragment of theropod bone and some petrified wood pictured below- Here's a view of small portion of the area we were hunting My group decided to call it a day early as it was 105 degrees Fahrenheit in the valley at one point making hiking nearly unbearable.
  7. Hey everyone, I've entered the final week of my awesome 3 week excursion with PaleoProspectors! We finish in Northern Montana in the Judith River formation. Monday we started at microsite which was easily accessed and a location I had some success two years prior- in 2017 I found a Troodon tooth here among other nice fossils. It became readily apparent that this location was going to give us another productive day. Although I found no complete theropod teeth early on, I did find a number of partials and fragments, along with spit teeth and some crocodilian fossils. The beautiful view from where we parked. Piece of crocodilian osteoderm Some spit teeth, most likely hadrosaur. The tip of a tyrannosaurid tooth A view from the microsite And now for my big find of the day! A huge tyrannosaurid tooth. I was so excited that I had to prep it out that night and I was happy with how it came out. oh yeah I also found a lil croc tooth after this. Some more views of the site and who I'm collecting with
  8. My brother collects rocks, I however do not. I was at a local auction and there were a number of neat rocks I purchased a bunch and turns out for the most part I did really well. However, this one neither of us knew about but given they came from a museum I was hopeful, the label reads “Petrified turtle eggs, sack of three eggs, Lamedeer, Montana.” I have a whole five bucks invested into it so it won’t hurt me if it’s just a rock.
  9. I have four Ankylosaur and Nodosaur teeth for trade. Looking to trade for other dinosaur teeth. All teeth from the Judith River Formation of Montana Tooth #1 Likely Euoplocephalus sp. about 1/4"
  10. Mysterious Montana fossil

    Recently, I took a class that required me to go to Montana to study Geology. One of my finds included this fossilized object that I would consider some type of seed or pine cone of sort. Any help is greatly appreciated.
  11. I have this nautiloid/ammonite that I *think* comes from the "Bear Paw" locality of Montana (Cretaceous) - or at least that is the info I have for it. Can anyone tell me if this is correct, and what species/type of fossil ammonite this is? Thanks!
  12. Unknown fossil Montana

  13. Are dinosaur fossils ‘minerals’? The Montana Supreme Court will decide high stakes case By Jeremy P. Jacobs, E&E News, Science News, July 10, 2019 https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/07/are-dinosaur-fossils-minerals-montana-supreme-court-will-decide-high-stakes-case It should be noted, as the article states: “In April, Montana enacted a law that states "fossils are not minerals and that fossils belong to the surface estate." The law, however, does not apply to existing disputes, though the "Dueling Dinos" case is likely the only existing matter of its kind." Yours, Paul H.
  14. Unknown Hell Creek Fossils

    Any information on the following finds would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
  15. Hell Creek Fossil ID

    Hello, Last post. I found these all within a few feet in the Hellcreek formation. I'm not sure if they're at all related or not. The bone seems to be shaped like a wing. Another small piece of what appears to be scales. Two small vertebrate and a what appears to be a tooth. Thanks Again.
  16. Fossil ID Hell Creek MT

    Hello Again, Sorry about the barrage of posts but I have a few more fossils I would like to get ID. Thanks again. I really appreciate the wealth of knowledge on the site. All found in MT on the Hell Creek formation. Nic
  17. Multiple Vertebrate (Hells Creek, MT)

    Hello, I have a what I believe are a few different vertebrate that were found in the Hell Creek Formation in Montana. They were all found in different locations within a few mile radius. From left to right you can refer to them as fossil a, b, and c. Any help on the ID would be appreciated. Sorry about the multiple ID questions but I'm excited to find out what I have found. Thanks in advance. Nic
  18. Hell Creek Montana

    Hello All, I found this fossil in the Hell Creek formation in Montana. At first I thought it was a turtle but after looking closer I noticed it appeared to have a spine with with a rib cage or some sort of appendeges on each side. I have included a few pictures. Hope I can get an ID on this. Thanks in Advance. Nic
  19. Does anyone know if there is any overlap of BLM land on parts of the Hell Creek Formation in either South Dakota or Montana? Or are there other Mesozoic formations that have BLM overlap in South Dakota, Montana, or Wyoming for that matter? Judith River? Two Medicine? Morrison? Have an upcoming trip through all those states, might be nice to have the ability to collect some non vertebrate fossils along the way.
  20. Hey everyone! Today is my birthday and I’m looking to treat myself to a Nanotyrannus lancensis tooth! I’m looking at this one, but these are the only two photos that the seller has listed. It is listed as being 1 1/16 in long and collected from the Hell Creek Formation in Powder River Co., Montana. Do I need to ask for addition photos of the base and tip, or is this enough to satisfy? Thanks in advance!
  21. So I was rooting again around in the garage and found a couple plates I had bought a few years back and never tracked down an ID for. Tentative provenance was Paleocene from Montana. I found this article recently and was wondering if it could be one of the genera/sp described or one of the other genera mentioned in the discussion section. Trapa, Trapago, Fortuna, Quereuxia. STOCKEY, R. A., AND G. W. ROTHWELL. 1997. The aquatic angiosperm Trapago angulata from the Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) St. Mary River Formation of southern Alberta. Int. J. Pl. Sci. 158: 83-94. Can be found here: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/240563741_The_Aquatic_Angiosperm_Trapago_angulata_from_the_Upper_Cretaceous_Maastrichtian_St_Mary_River_Formation_of_Southern_Alberta I also was looking at the USGS pub 375 https://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/0375/report.pdf My plates have a number of leaflets and fragments with very little venation visible and in a pale gray and a light pink color in a very fine matrix.....Many of the leaflets have small teeth... Plates: Crenulations Leaflets and partial venation Anyone have any expertise in these? Looks like the authors were indicating more study is needed in this area of aquatic plants--that was 20 years ago. Any help is appreciated. Thanks! Regards, Chris
  22. Tiny Hell Creek Theropod Tooth

    I just found this little tooth for sale. It is from the Hell Creek Formation in Montana and is 5/16" long. Assuming that includes the fake root, by measuring on my screen it appears to actually be 3/16" long along the distal edge. Serrations then are about 9 per 1/16" distal and 13.5 per 1/16" mesial and look more rod-like than chisel-like to me. There are no ridges on the sides, so it's not Acheroraptor. Could it be Dakotaraptor? This species has been #1 on my list for a while and I would love to have this in my collection if it is Dakotaraptor.
  23. Is this a genuine Triceratops frill fragment? It is from Hell Creek, MT. The seller has other frill pieces that look similar, along with other dino teeth. From what I've read in other posts, it sounds like presence of blood grooves confirm identity as a triceratops frill. I don't see overt grooves on the planar surface but I see evidence of a thin spongy bone layer in the cross section suggesting to me it is still bone of some sort. Thanks for any assistance.
  24. Crocodile Osteoderm

    From the album Judith River fm. Fossil Finds

    Here's the second piece of crocodilian osteoderm I found in Montana in the summer of 2017. It may also be from Leidyosuchus.
  25. Crocodile Osteoderm

    From the album Judith River fm. Fossil Finds

    This osteoderm may belong to Leidyosuchus.
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