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Found 132 results

  1. Montana Recommendations

    I've got an upcoming trip to Montana starting in Great Falls but spending most of our time in Flathead Valley. I'm thinking of going through Bynum to stop at Two Medicine Dinosaur Center, but was wondering if anyone had recommendations for other places to hit (sites, museums, shops, etc). Thanks!
  2. An very rare Ornithomimus foot claw and digit is being offered for sale from the Hell Creek Formation of Montana. It's a beautiful claw unfortunately it belongs to a Thescelosaurus. The digit probably also belongs to a Thescelosaurus but it's a from a phalanx position 1 and therefore not next to the claw like shown in the photo. What you are spending your money here is for the claw not the digit. It's not very rare claw but nicely preserved and a great addition to any collection.
  3. Spring 2018 Dino Trip

    Anytime you can go collecting fossils its a good time and I would like to share my spring trip to South Dakota and Montana. My South Dakota site is in the upper Hell Creek Formation and full of the hadrosaur Edmontosaurus annectens. I've been collecting this site for over 20 years and its still delivering. We are on the edge of a bluff and the fossil layer can be between 2 to 4 feet. Lots of good bones are to be found but we also have lots of punky or junk bones and about 70 % is collectible. The site is quite large and like I said last year we have no idea of its size but it contains scores of hadrosaurs, all disarticulated. No skulls are found but all the elements that make up a skull can be found. I like collecting in the section where smaller bones, unguals-toe-carpal-verts, are more typical while others like to go after larger limb bones. My trip to these areas takes me through the Chile Capital of the World, Hatch, New Mexico. Greeting me is Mr Rex a good start to my trip. I hear he is harmless... all show no action Some pictures of the South Dakota site The collecting zone is between the white lines a layer of 2 to 4 feet. The layer is shown below. The top is very crumbly and full of concretions. My Collecting gear consists of a tool box with everything I need to collect My glue field consolidant, orange bottle, without strength but is easy to prep and my structural glue, red. Activator to accelerate curing which rarely used. Tips for the glue Basic Tools I like to use No its not a beach day but temperatures approaching 90 degrees (32C) can get pretty hot so some protection is needed
  4. Hadrosaur Coracoid

    Left coracoid of a young hadrosaur from the Judith River formation. Both lambeosaurine and saurolophine hadrosaurs are present in the Judith River formation. I would lean towards this coracoid belonging to a lambeosaurine hadrosaur. In this case Lambeosaurus or Corythosaurus would be good candidates.
  5. Possible Dinosaur Bones. ID Help.

    Hello, I found these 4 bones today. The three on the right were all in fairly close proximity to each other and the bone on the far left was found alone. I am having trouble figuring out if these are modern day bones or dinosaur bones. A few main reasons that lead me to believe they're not modern is the location. I found these at the base of a large hillside within the Hell Creek formation slightly buried in the dirt. This is an area that has produced dinosaur bones in the past. Also it seems to me when I find more modern day bones usually the entire animal itself or other bones can be found nearby (cattle, deer, and etc.). Any ID help would be greatly appreciated also let me know if I need to provide more detailed pictures. Thanks, Nic
  6. Petrified Wood. ID help and discussion.

    Over the past couple weeks I have seemed to find multiple variations of petrified wood. In this picture the top few pieces were all found in the same area and some of the smaller pieces that I found have little crystals throughout them (like the one in the top of this image). The piece I found on the bottom confuses me because it resembles wood but also has a mineral/rock look to it. I have read into agatized petrified wood but I still don't know much about that process. In the past I have found very large pieces of what I believed to be petrified wood but the majority of the piece resembled a crystal. Unfortunately I don't have those with me but will post a picture of them when I get home. Any info and help on the subject would be appreciated. Also sorry the picture posted weird. When i refer to the top I mean the right side of the image. Thanks, Nic
  7. Fossilized Pine Cone?

    I found this today in a stream bed and I have no clue as to what it is. It resembles a pine cone but its hard and brittle like a rock. It also has a hollow middle. Any ID help would be appreciated. Thanks. Nic
  8. Dinosaur Bone ID Help.

    I found this today in east central Montana. I believe it is a dinosaur bone. it has a hole on the one side that goes in about an inch. Thanks in advance for the help! Nic
  9. Fossil? ID help

    Any help with identification would be greatly appreciated. I was found in a stream bed in the hell creek formation area in Montana. I it pretty flat on the bottom with shell like material on the top. Its not porous like alot of the other bones I have seen. Any input would be awesome! Thanks!
  10. Fossil ID Help.

    Hello, I found this today in a creek bottom in SE Montana. Any ID help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
  11. Janvier, P. & Lund, R. 1983 – Hardistiella montaniensis from the Lower Carboniferous of Montana with remarks on the affinity of the lampreys. J. Vert. Paleont. 2, 407-413. Janvier, P. & Lund, R. 1986 – A second lamprey from the Lower Carboniferous of Bear Gulch Montana. Geobios 19, 647-652. Robert S. Sansom, Sarah E. Gabbott, and Mark A. Purnell Decay of vertebrate characters in hagfish and lamprey (Cyclostomata) and the implications for the vertebrate fossil record Proc. R. Soc. B. 2011 278 1709 1150-1157
  12. Tooth or Concretion

    Information: Squares in the background are 1/2 CM. (object is roughly 2.25X1.25X0.5 CM) (length-width-thickness) Unfortunately I don't think location information will be much use here but: Found in western Montana (United States)(near Great Falls) in a graveled driveway. No idea where it might be from, or if it was already here before the driveway. I'd be more than happy to provide more pictures/angles if it'll help. My little auto-adjusting light was being extremely temperamental with these pictures for some reason.. they are a fair bit darker than the object actually appears in-hand. The inner "tooth" is nearly pure black. I thought when I first picked it up that it was a tooth of some sort.. but the more I look at it, the more I'm thinking some sort of concretion. I don't claim to have any experience whatsoever with fossils, so I could easily be wildly wrong. Any of you more experienced folks recognize it? As a side note, if it does turn out something other than a normal rock, would I want to try to remove it from the other material? Any recommendations on doing so safely?
  13. Montana Fossil ID

    I found these today in southeastern Montana. I am located right on the edge of the Fort Union and Hell Creek formations. I am pretty sure the one on the left is an ammonite. What about the one on the right? Is that just a chunk of coral?
  14. I found this today in southeastern Montana at the bottom of a large hillside. I believe it is a dinosaur bone due to its porous nature help on ID would be appreciated.
  15. Ceratopsian tooth from Montana

    I bought this ceratopsian tooth. Is from Northwest Montana (two medicine formation) and is 0.8" in size. Species is unidentified.
  16. KU Juvenile T. rex

    I haven't been on the forum much over the last several years but I thought I'd share an article about a specimen I discovered in Montana in 2016; our KU Juvenile Tyrannosaurid. I was also hired as an assistant preparator at the KU Natural History Museum and I have been working on the specimen for several months. There is more material to the specimen than is shown in the video but we hope to share more as we move forward on our publication. https://www.history.com/news/tyrannosaurs-rex-montana-paleontology-discovery We are very proud of our KU fossil and it will hopefully answer several of the questions surrounding the Nannotyrannus debate -Kris Super
  17. Baby Tyrannosaur fossil

    http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/03/29/stunning-dinosaur-discovery-experts-may-have-unearthed-baby-tyrannosaur-fossil-in-montana.html
  18. Albertosaurus tooth for sale

    Hello everyone. I saw this nice Albertosaurus tooth fragment online being sold for relatively cheap (under 80$). I thought it had nice size,serrations and tip. It is from the Judith formation in Montana. Do you think it is worth considering? Or do you think I should keep my money. If I could get it a bit repaired and nicely reglue the fragments,It could be quite neat I think. It would be my first Tyrannosaurid in my collection (and my only for a long time). What do you think? Here are the 3 pictures I have. Thanks alot,Regards
  19. Segmented Cambrian fossil

    Hi there! I picked up this fossil while trilobite hunting over the summer along the continental divide in Montana. I keep looking at it and my curiosity is getting the better of me. I don't know if it is a trace fossil or a plant or something else. All I know is its not a trilobite. Maybe related to a stalked echinoderm or a crinoid, unfortunately I haven't found any applicable literature. This was found loose among various trilobite fragments at the base of Dearborn Limestone cliffs with Pagoda Limestone, Pentagon Shale and Steamboat Limestone above so this should be Middle Cambrian. The intriguing aspect to this fossil is the seemingly segmented appendages stemming from a central stalk. I am just another novice collector who enjoys all aspects of the natural world with limited geology experience but I more fossil hunts planned. Thanks for looking, jj
  20. Documented in this paper is baby hadrosaur that represents the first occurrence of an articulated nestling dinosaur skeleton from the latest Cretaceous (late Maastrichtian) of North America. It's from the Hell Creek of Montana, Garfield County. Edmontosaurus annectens Red... Scapula Purple.. Vert column Green..Pubis Blue.. Femur & Tibia Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. ....Paywalled for non members.. A nestling-sized skeleton of Edmontosaurus(Ornithischia, Hadrosauridae) from the Hell Creek Formation of northeastern Montana, U.S.A., with an analysis of ontogenetic limb allometry Mateusz Wosik,Mark B. Goodwin &David C. Evans http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02724634.2017.1398168?journalCode=ujvp20#.Wog2CXWObFg.twitter
  21. Hello, these teeth were sold to me as a mix of Triceratops and hadrosaur spitter teeth from Hell Creek Formation of Montana. Thanks to @Troodon, I now know these kinda teeth are ceratopsian spitter. Is there any way to tell if they belong to Triceratops, or any of ceratopsians such as Leptoceratops? Also, teeth 4 and 5 are unusually shiny. At the right angle, parts of them almost seem to be bronze. Are they pyritized? If so, is this common for Hell Creek teeth? Thank you for your time. Teeth 4 Teeth 5
  22. Permit to hunt fossils

    I've heard that there is a permit that you have to get to hunt fossils on public land in Montana now. Anyone have any news on this
  23. METASEQUOIA DAWN REDWOOD 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    METASEQUOIA DAWN REDWOOD Muddy Creek Formation, Beaver Head County, Montana Oligocene Age (5 million years ago) The Dawn Redwood (Metasequoia) is a genus that dates all the way back to the age of dinosaur it is related to the California Redwoods and was thought to be extinct until living specimens were discovered in central China in 1944. First called a “fossil tree” because it was believed extinct, the fast-growing tree is now a favorite ornamental tree. It was (and is) a deciduous conifer. Today’s Metasequoia has a full pyramidal shape, grows to 120′ high. Dimensions: 2.6 Inches Long, 2.2 Inches Wide. Dawn redwoods are fast-growing trees. They will grow too large for small gardens, but can be good in a wide range of larger gardens and parks. Although they live in wet sites in their native habitat they will also tolerate dry soils. Kingdom: Plantae Division: Pinophyta Class: Pinopsida Order: Pinales Family: Cupressaceae Subfamily: Sequoioideae Genus: Metasequoia
  24. METASEQUOIA DAWN REDWOOD 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    METASEQUOIA DAWN REDWOOD Muddy Creek Formation, Beaver Head County, Montana Oligocene Age (5 million years ago) The Dawn Redwood (Metasequoia) is a genus that dates all the way back to the age of dinosaur it is related to the California Redwoods and was thought to be extinct until living specimens were discovered in central China in 1944. First called a “fossil tree” because it was believed extinct, the fast-growing tree is now a favorite ornamental tree. It was (and is) a deciduous conifer. Today’s Metasequoia has a full pyramidal shape, grows to 120′ high. Dimensions: 2.6 Inches Long, 2.2 Inches Wide. Dawn redwoods are fast-growing trees. They will grow too large for small gardens, but can be good in a wide range of larger gardens and parks. Although they live in wet sites in their native habitat they will also tolerate dry soils. Kingdom: Plantae Division: Pinophyta Class: Pinopsida Order: Pinales Family: Cupressaceae Subfamily: Sequoioideae Genus: Metasequoia
  25. I am looking into going to a Fossil dig (looking at the Marmarth Foundation and Paleoadventures) over the summer. I have noticed that some digs specify you have to pay for some of your finds ie T Rex teeth. Anyone have any advice on how much I should spend on T Rex tooth? Or able to give me a crash course on appraising their worth? I dont want to just shell out $$ over a tooth that isnt worth half the amount I paid.
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