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Found 580 results

  1. I've had a number of questions raised via PMs and posts on Dinosaur claws from the Kem Kem Beds so here is a topic on that subject. We know very little about their morphology and that is not unexpected because this region continues to mystify everyone and new discoveries are constantly changing our understanding of these dinosaurs. Spinosaurid foot claws are the best understood but since we really do not know how many species exist, currently two, its difficult to assign the morphology shown below to any specific one. Best described as Spinosaurid indet. Note the dimple on the ventral surface The claw shown below is generally accepted as a Spinosaurid hand claw but like the foot claw cannot assign it to a specific species. Not aware of any publication showing this morphology in the Kem Kem but very similar to claws in other regions. Best described as Spinossurid indet. Abelsaurid foot claws..multiple species may exists do there may be some variation to this design Best described as Abelsaurid indet. Foot Claw of a Carcharodontosaurid. No Kem Kem claws have been described so like Spinosaurids hand claws we look at other regikns to compare agsinst. Tyrannotitan is a Carcharodontosaurid from Argentina Again there are multiple species described so best described as Carcharodontosaurid indet. Possible Reference paper http://www.academia.edu/1080746/Theropod_pedal_unguals_from_the_Late_Cretaceous_Cenomanian_of_Morocco_Africa
  2. common ground ,conflicting interests

    mighthavebeensaidbeforeandperhapsmoreleoquently,butthisisinFrench this being the article "Fossiles du Maroc : La relation incestueuse des scientifiques et des trafiquants" The author has fairly recently edited a many-paged volume(600+pages) on the fossil vertebrates of Morocco,which I believe might constitute a state-of-the-art book.I couldn't find a TOC online, but there's at least a chapter on placoderms by Rucklin/Clement(diacritics omitted) ->page ads fairly restrained<- related: morogeoconservaPlan cours André CHARRIERE.pdf the conclusion("a"conclusion?): "Bilan : patrimoine paléontologique d’intérêt mondial ; essentiel des grands bouleversements paléoenvironnementaux, paléoclimatiques et tectoniques mondiaux sont enregistrés dans le géopatrimoine marocain." freely paraphrased: Moroccan geoheritage sites contain a wealth of information on paleoclimate,tectonics,and paleoecology
  3. I had already planned on sharing this a couple days ago. With the recent posting of the Martian pseudocrinoid, the timing of this new paper is perfect! Bonus Points Question: Trombonicrinus (col.) hanshessi gen. et sp. nov. Does anyone have a suggestion for the use of the abbreviation (col.)? A colleague responded: "Odd. I imagine it is for column, but do not really know. If so, it would be as if they are regarded it as a form genus allowed in the botanical, but not the zoological code." Etymology: From the French trombone (earlier, trombon), a brass wind instrument with a slide bent in a tight U-shape (Little et al. 1983, p. 2368). The overall appearance of this crinoid stem is reminiscent of the slide of a trombone. Donovan, S.K., Waters, J.A. and Pankowski, M.S. 2018 Form and function of the strangest crinoid stem: Devonian of Morocco. Swiss Journal of Palaeontology, (ahead-of-print publication) 6 pp.
  4. Thanks to some help from @Troodon I now understand much more about Kem Kem and how little is understood there still regarding fossils and species of that area.. I tend to find that buying these fossils online becomes a difficult task because of how much eveeything is ID’d wrong. I’ve done pretty well with dodging the really bad junk stuff, like two different fossils being plastered together, fakes, etc. (At least I’m almost positive), but sometimes you buy things and of course it’s a different animal than l you expected.. I’m not sure if there is already a thread for this but anyway, this way others can benefit also... two questions: 1.) does anyone know any credible, honest, and knowledgable fossil dealers who deal moroccan fossils online, who from your experience is good to buy from? 2.) any good literature, or links online for learning more about dinosaurs and reptiles of Kem Kem?
  5. Squalicorax Pristodontus 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Squalicorax pristodontus tooth Morocco Cretaceous Period (65 - 146 Million years ago) Squalicorax is a genus of extinct lamniform shark known to have lived during the Cretaceous period. These sharks are of medium size, up to 5 m (usually around 2 m) in length. Their bodies were similar to the modern gray sharks, but the shape of the teeth is strikingly similar to that of a tiger shark. The teeth are numerous, relatively small, with a curved crown and serrated, up to 2.5 – 3 cm in height (the only representative of the Mesozoic Lamniformes with serrated teeth). Large numbers of fossil teeth have been found in Europe, North Africa, and North America. Squalicorax was a coastal predator, but also scavenged as evidenced by a Squalicorax tooth found embedded in the metatarsal (foot) bone of a terrestrial hadrosaurid dinosaur that most likely died on land and ended up in the water. Other food sources included turtles, mosasaurs, ichthyodectes, and other bony fishes and sea creatures. Squalicorax pristodontus (Agassiz, 1843) is the largest species, more than 5 m long. From the size of its largest known teeth, it can be estimated that S. pristodontus grew to 5 m (16.5 ft) in length. It lived during the late Campanian to early Maastrichtian of North America, France, the Netherlands, Egypt, Morocco, and Madagascar. The relatively complete remains (vertebrae and fragments of jaws) have been found in marine sediments in North America. It is the species with the largest teeth, these teeth being loosely spaced and relatively very large in comparison with other species. In this genus of sharks studies have shown no precise correlation between the size of the teeth and the length of the body. They could eat relatively large prey and carrion. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Lamniformes Family: †Anacoracidae Genus: †Squalicorax Species: †pristodontus
  6. Squalicorax Pristodontus 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Squalicorax pristodontus tooth Morocco Cretaceous Period (65 - 146 Million years ago) Squalicorax is a genus of extinct lamniform shark known to have lived during the Cretaceous period. These sharks are of medium size, up to 5 m (usually around 2 m) in length. Their bodies were similar to the modern gray sharks, but the shape of the teeth is strikingly similar to that of a tiger shark. The teeth are numerous, relatively small, with a curved crown and serrated, up to 2.5 – 3 cm in height (the only representative of the Mesozoic Lamniformes with serrated teeth). Large numbers of fossil teeth have been found in Europe, North Africa, and North America. Squalicorax was a coastal predator, but also scavenged as evidenced by a Squalicorax tooth found embedded in the metatarsal (foot) bone of a terrestrial hadrosaurid dinosaur that most likely died on land and ended up in the water. Other food sources included turtles, mosasaurs, ichthyodectes, and other bony fishes and sea creatures. Squalicorax pristodontus (Agassiz, 1843) is the largest species, more than 5 m long. From the size of its largest known teeth, it can be estimated that S. pristodontus grew to 5 m (16.5 ft) in length. It lived during the late Campanian to early Maastrichtian of North America, France, the Netherlands, Egypt, Morocco, and Madagascar. The relatively complete remains (vertebrae and fragments of jaws) have been found in marine sediments in North America. It is the species with the largest teeth, these teeth being loosely spaced and relatively very large in comparison with other species. In this genus of sharks studies have shown no precise correlation between the size of the teeth and the length of the body. They could eat relatively large prey and carrion. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Lamniformes Family: †Anacoracidae Genus: †Squalicorax Species: †pristodontus
  7. Offered these two toe bones from a Spinosaurus. Claw appears to be from a Spinosaurid but identifying the phalanx to one is very problematic. Not a lot of comparative material out there. Regardless that phalanx location does not have a claw next to it.. Offered these two Spinosaurus toe finger bones Both belong to a Spinosaurid but one is a foot claw the other is a hand carpal Offered these three Spinosaurus toe finger bones. Dont believe the claw belongs to a Spinosaurus and like before identifying the two phalanx to a species is very difficult Offered are a Spinosaurus hand bone and claw Very cool pair great addition to any collection. The bone looks like a phalanx not a hand bone indeterminate species but the claw is not like anything I've seen before. No idea whats its from but very nice. Offered are these two unidentified theropod bones and claw. What you have here is an Abelsaurid claw and two unknown bones one of which may not be dinosaurian. What you are buying here is that claw its very nice. There are other other digits, claws offered. If you are interested please post them here and we will give them a look before you buy
  8. Hi guys! Saw this fossil online for a cheap price and I was wondering if it was real. I’m not very familiar with these Moroccan fossils but this piece looks ok to me, I just prefer to ask. The left fragment piece looks a bit weird. It is 30cm. Thanks for the help (this is the only picture I have,sorry...) kind regards
  9. Clonograptus rigidus

    The thecae are more closely packed and shorter than in the similar Paradelograptus. Useful paper, with graptolite illustrations (Fig. 5), here: The Lower Ordovician Fezouata Konservat-Lagerstätte from Morocco
  10. This rather tasty, large graptolite just arrived after a surprise auction win. It's labelled Clonograptus rigidus Hall which seems reasonable though I'm always being caught out by these. The location is given as 25km north of Zagora (should be OK?) but the age is given as Floian stage when I'm pretty sure it should be Tremadocian, probably Murrayi Zone. ( @Spongy Joe - I guess you've seen a lot like this... )
  11. Croc Jaw

    I bought this interesting jaw which the seller said is a section of the upper croc jaw. He said it could be Elosuchus. What do you think? This is from the kemkem beds. I've lowed the size of the images so I can upload more.
  12. A number of vertebrae are up for sale from the Kem Kem beds. I would recommend if you have interest in any, please post them here for comment like some of you already have. I've commented on a few. Spinosaurs dorsal vertebra being offered for sale. Please exercise caution on this specimen. It has tons of fill and the centrum shape looks off. Hard to determine if this is a composite or from the same vertebra. Dorsal vertebra should look like this in lateral view. A Carcharodontosaurus centrum being offered for sale. Not sure one can identify this to any specific Dinosaur or Reptile. A Spinosaur caudal vertebra being offered for sale. Not sure what this is, not Spinosaurus. The centrum might be one but not the spines, look like crock. Spines may be composited Two Caudal vertebrae from a Sauropod are being offered. Unfortunately the one on the left is Crocodilian and the one on the right might also be one or theropod, needs cleaning up. Another similar group of Verts is being offered same comments. Neural spines like the one below typically are Croc. Okay not a vert but not dinosaurian as offered. Reptlian
  13. Vertebra ID?

    I am currently browsing the internet for an affordable Moroccan dinosaur vertebra, and I have (potentially) found one. However, the seller does not provide an identification for this piece. The only write up provided is: (not directly copied from the seller's writeup) It is 5.8 cm x 6.7 cm x 5.2 cm in volume, and it was found in the Kem Kem basin. Here are the images. I have absolutely no clue how to identify vertebrae, as I have only ever collected fossils from the Ordovician! Any input would be valued. Thank you! FS
  14. Found this tooth yesterday in a grouping of various Kem Kem fossils and dinosaur teeth. It has distinct small serration denticles on what I would call the posterior/distal carina. And it has a distinct anterior carinae with even smaller, but not as well defined denticles. Crenulations may be a more suitable word for the anterior/mesial one’s. It is labial-lingually compressed. And it has a lozenge shaped cross section. Any ideas on what it may be from? Croc? Dinosaur? Fish?
  15. Pterosaur cervical vertebra?

    Hi, just wondering if this is a pterosaur cervical vertebra (listed as such) since i can't find any similar specimens or references. It is from Morocco (Kem Kem Basin) and is 6.2cm (just under 2 and a half inches).
  16. Hi, Here is the photos of a "Stromatolite Fossil from Morocco" that I just going to get from a seller, but after I read a post from another member, I am confused. A member named Ebo mentioned that this is not a real Stromatolite. How is the real Stromatolite Fossil looks like? I googled "Stromatolite Fossil from Morocco" and most of the photos looks similar to my photos.
  17. I decided to (finally) spend some money and buy a mosasaur jaw section- my first jaw! I know that there are many fabricated mosasaur jaw sections out there, but I have ascertained for myself that this one is nothing to worry about. However, I still think that if there are indeed any problems with it, expert input would not hurt at all. Maybe I could even attempt extraction! (with the the proper methods, of course.) I really prefer fossils outside of their matrix- I am never content with 1/2 of a fossil while the rest remains entombed inside. Behold! Halisaurus (arambourgi?) Jaw section The section is 8.89 centimeters in length, and 3.17 centimeters in height (crown tip to the bottom of jaw) Found in: "phosphate mine region, Khouribga, Morocco." I wish they could be more specific. This would make a fine addition to my currently expanding collection. Thank you all for your input! If anybody is brave enough to figure out what part of the jaw this is from, that would be fantastic as well.
  18. ID: Large Crinoid

    Bought a nice big Crinoid from a friend of mine. Was found somewhere in Morocco, and apparently is from somewhere in the Devonian period. Is definitely not Schyphocrinites, that being what you usually see from Moroccan Crinoids. Not to good at Crinoid ID myself, so I’m seeking help. Specimen is 9.5” long at longest point, and 7” tall at tallest.
  19. NICE!!http://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article/file?id=10.1371/journal.pbio.2001663&type=printable 51 Mb,highly recommended, first description of a new species,Alcione. A cladistic analysis is included,BTW. Very ,very solid documentation of the material
  20. This fossil comes from the Phosphate Mines of Kourigba, Morocco. The fossil is 10cm and the matrix is 14 x 11cm overall. Is it possible to identify this fossil?.
  21. hello freinds today i found tgis fossil in sahara i can t identify but i think the one is a ptychodus teeth but i can confirm it plase if you can helo me. it shine wih sun . and she is solid
  22. trilobite Hamatolenus

    Hi, i've bought that trilobite last week-end in an exposition of fossils and minerals. I've forgotten to ask what trilo it was and the seller forgot to tell me. I know it's a Redlichiida, Ellipsocephalidae, Hamatolenus from the Cambrian of Morocco. If one of you had an idea about its genus, it will be welcome. P.S. appparently, it was in the ptychopariida order and would now be in the redlichiida order, or am i wrong ?
  23. new ammonite to identify

    fiends hallo again i found this ammonite but i can t identify i think it s rare or note ?
  24. Palaeocarcharodon orientalis 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Palaeocarcharodon orientalis tooth Oued Zem, Morocco Paleocene (61.7 to 55.8 Million Years Ago) Palaeocarcharodon, also known as the pygmy white shark, is a genus of sharks in the family Cretoxyrhinidae. Palaeocarcharodon orientalis is the only species of this genus. These sharks lived in the Paleocene, from 61.7 to 55.8 Ma. Teeth of Palaeocarcharodon are triangular, labio-lingually compressed, with quite irregular serrations and serrate lateral cusplets. They can reach a size of about 3–6 centimetres (1.2–2.4 in.) Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Lamniformes Family: †Cretoxyrhinidae Genus: †Palaeocarcharodon Species: †orientalis
  25. Palaeocarcharodon orientalis 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Palaeocarcharodon orientalis tooth Oued Zem, Morocco Paleocene (61.7 to 55.8 Million Years Ago) Palaeocarcharodon, also known as the pygmy white shark, is a genus of sharks in the family Cretoxyrhinidae. Palaeocarcharodon orientalis is the only species of this genus. These sharks lived in the Paleocene, from 61.7 to 55.8 Ma. Teeth of Palaeocarcharodon are triangular, labio-lingually compressed, with quite irregular serrations and serrate lateral cusplets. They can reach a size of about 3–6 centimetres (1.2–2.4 in.) Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Lamniformes Family: †Cretoxyrhinidae Genus: †Palaeocarcharodon Species: †orientalis
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