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Found 377 results

  1. Kem Kem Vertebrae ID Thread

    So, lets figure out vertebrae from the Kem Kem beds. As many of you know the Kem Kem beds has a pretty enigmatic palaeo fauna. There is some literature about it, but not a whole lot. Some of it is behind a paywall and much information is pretty scattered. So I got this idea that maybe we could combine our knowledge and information to collectively get a better picture of which bone belongs to which animal, in this case, vertebrae. I know some of you have some fantastic specimens in your collections, if we combine these in this thread we might be able to see some patterns. We probably won't be able to put a genus or species name on each type, but perhaps assigning certain vertebrae to a morphotype might be possible. With that I encourage everyone that has any vertebrae from the Kem Kem beds to share photos of their specimens and post them here so we can use this thread as a sort of library as well as an ID thread that everyone can use to better ID their Kem Kem vertebrae. So please, share your photos! And it might help to number your specimens for easier reference. I will be updating this first post as new information arises with examples to make ID easier. Theropods Spinosaurus aegyptiacus Spinosaurus is known for it's tall neural spines, which are pretty characteristic. Unlike Sigilmassasaurus, Spinosaurus does not have the ventral triangular rough plateau on the centra Spinosaurus cervical vertebrae Spinosaurus dorsal, sacral and caudal vertebrae Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis Sigilmassasaurus is a Spinosaurid that might be closely related to Baryonyx and Suchomimus. It differs from Spinosaurus in that it has a ventral keel on many vertebrae and a triangular rough plateau on the bottom back end. A is Sigilmassasaurus, B is Baryonyx Sigilmassasaurus cervical vertebrae Sigilmassasaurus dorsal vertebrae Indeterminate Spinosaurid vertebrae Not a whole lot has been published yet, so some bones can probably not be ID'd on genus level. Spinosaurid caudal vertebrae From Paleoworld-101's collection Charcharodontosaurids Due to an old paper Sigilmassasaurus vertebrae are sometimes misidentified as Carcharodontosaurid. These vertebrae should be identified on the basis of the original description by Stromer. Carcharodontosaurid cervical vertebrae Abelisaurids examples needed Deltadromeus agilis better examples needed Sauropods Rebbachisaurus Rebbachisaurus dorsal vertebrae Unnamed Titanosaurian mid caudal vertebra Crocodiles more examples needed Kemkemia This crocodile is only known by a single terminal caudal vertebra. Kemkemia caudal vertebra Turtles examples needed Pterosaurs Azhdarchids Azhdarchid (probably Alanqa) posterior fragment cervical vertebra Sources Spinosaurids https://peerj.com/articles/1323/?utm_source=TrendMD&utm_campaign=PeerJ_TrendMD_1&utm_medium=TrendMD http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0144695 Sauropods https://www.researchgate.net/publication/304214496_Evidence_of_a_derived_titanosaurian_Dinosauria_Sauropoda_in_the_Kem_Kem_beds_of_Morocco_with_comments_on_sauropod_paleoecology_in_the_Cretaceous_of_Africa Kemkemia sisn.pagepress.org/index.php/nhs/article/viewFile/nhs.2012.119/32 Pterosaurs https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.thefossilforum.com%2Fapplications%2Fcore%2Finterface%2Ffile%2Fattachment.php%3Fid%3D432009&fname=journal.pone.0010875.PDF&pdf=true
  2. Interesting coral - Morocco

    Hi all, I was perusing the gem show down in Tucson today and came across these interesting little corals. The vendor couldn't identify them except to say they were from Morocco and were coral. Anyone out there know what these are? They measure about 1 1/2" - 2" across.
  3. For those collectors that love Moroccan dinosaur material I have some good news and some not so good news. The good news is that we finally have an Abelsaurid described from Morocco its called Chenanisaurus barbaricus . The not so good news is that its NOT from the Kem Kem Beds but from the Maastrichtian Phosphate Mines in the Ouled Abdoun basin. . I reported about this theropod back in 2015 and a jaw, with teeth, was subsequently found which enabled paleontologists to describe this new species. This is what is lacking in the Kem Kem Beds. We should have a march in Morocco to protest lack of Jaws.... Two teeth from my collection Now that we have a name I raise the red flag with all collectors to be cautious of individuals trying to sell Carcharodontosaurus teeth from Kem Kem as this species. The best way insure your getting the correct locality is to have it on a matrix slab. Phosphate matrix is very different than the Kem Kem's. These teeth have been quite rare and I acquired the only two I've seen but now we have a name that always seems to attract entrepreneurs in Morocco . Dentary teeth should follow typical Abelsaurid morphology with the distal side being very perpendicular to the base. Paper: An abelisaurid from the latest Cretaceous (late Maastrichtian) of Morocco, North Africa Nicholas R. Longrich, Xabier Pereda-Suberbiola, Nour-Eddine Jalil, Fatima Khaldoune, Essaid Jourani http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195667116303706
  4. Looking for information on my abelisaur tooth.

    So I bought one of those small abelisaur teeth that came from kem kem that everyone keeps falsely calling raptor teeth. Does anyone know any more information on it? Abelisaurs have small teeth compared to their heads so the creature probably wasn't too tiny. It's about 1.5 - 2cm with even serrations. As i understand it not much is known of this animal but anything you guys know would be appreciated! -Tom
  5. Echinodermata from Morocco ID help

    Hello guys, can someone help determining the genus and species of this Protasteridae from Kaid Rami, please? 4,2 cm maximum diameter, part and counterpart. Thanks in advance, Miguel
  6. Hi guys, I've seen another 3 spinosaurus teeth form the same seller. What do you think about them? A) 120 [mm] weight: 88 [g] price: 232.93 [$] B ) 102 [mm] weight: 41 [g] price: 134 [$] C ) 143 [mm] price: 394 [$]
  7. Need ID on kemkem teeth

    Hello i have seen these teeth from kem kem in a fossil show and i was not able to know if it is pliosaur, pterosaur, fish ... ? Their size is from 2 to 4 CM. Thanks for your help
  8. Good afternoon to all! Any idea what kind of bone it might be? Any possible animal for this bone? Thanks for all the help!
  9. Updated 11/7/17 Although a lot of this has already been posted on a number of topics, I thought consolidation it might prove useful with some additional information. If you're planning to purchase theropod teeth from Morocco's Kem Kem Beds or already have some in your collection check this out. Moroccan theropods are poorly understood and not a lot has been published. Very few articulated skeletons have been found and most are partial and without a skull. There is also lots of mis-information, mostly unintentional, from some dealers but especially online auction sites. Unfortunately these are the most misidentified commercially sold dinosaur fossil around. Please post your interest here on the forum before you buy. Background: The Kem Kem Beds also known as the ‘‘Continental Intercalaire’’ or "Continental Red Beds" is composed of three formations: Akrabou, Aoufous and Ifezouane Formation. The latter two are the dinosaur producing sediments with the Ifezouane being the principal one. They are Cenomanian in age. The attached drawing gives a representation how they lay. The distribution of the different groups of fossils in the Ifezouane Formation can been see in the pie chart below. Dinosaurs make up a small percentage of what is collected. So first lets identify what is known to the best of my knowledge. Theropods that have been described across North Africa (focus on large bodied theropods) Theropods that have been described in Kem Kem: (family) Spinosaurus aegyptiacus * (Spinosaurid) *Some paleontologist believe this species is unique to Egypt and Kem Kem material should be identified as Spinosauid indet. Lots of questions exist over Ibrahim (2014) diagnosis which validated this species. Carcharodontosaurus saharicus (Carcharodontosaurid) Deltadromeus agilis (Neovenatorid) Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis (Spinosaurid) Sauroniops pachytholus (Carcharodontosaurid) Theropods that have not been described from the Kem Kem but isolated teeth exist and have been reflected in scientific papers: Dromaeosaurid sp.? Hendrickx suggested these are actually Noasaurid indet. Abelisaurid indet. Theropod teeth that are sold commercially but no scientific evidence yet to link them to the Kem Kem: Abelisaurus sp. (Not described from North Africa) Rugops sp. (Only described from Niger) Bahariasaurus sp. (Only described from Egypt) Elaphrosaurus sp. (From Jurassic of Tanzania) So what is being sold and what are the issues? Spinosaurid Teeth are well understood by both collector and dealers, see photo. Issues are typically associated with restoration and compositing a larger tooth from multiple teeth. Teeth with matrix attached to them are suspect for restoration so be careful. At least two species of Spinosaurids exits and it's currently impossible to determine if they are Spinosaurus or Sigilmassasaurus or Undescribed taxon. Conflicting taxonomic hypotheses have been proposed. Ibrahim at al (2014) suggest that all specimens found belong to Spinosaurus aegyptiacus. Evers et al (2015) regard Spinosaurus maroccanus and Sigiilmassaurus brevicollis as belonging to the same taxon Sigiilmassaurus brevicollis which is also supported by Hendrickx et al (2016). Ever at al (2015) also described additional specimens from a second unnamed Spinosaurid. Bottom line we do not have enough specimens to eliminate ontogenetic or sexual dimorphism differences and accurately describe Spinosaurids in the Kem Kem. So these teeth are best identified as: Spinosaurid indet. Carcharodontosaurid Teeth, those that are compressed and blade like, first photo. Wrinkles by the distal carina are diagnostic to this species. Mesial teeth are fat, slender and look very different (D shaped) (next three photos). Two species currently are described Carcharodontosaurus saharicus and Sauroniops pachytholus and its impossible to differentiate teeth between these taxons. Similiar to the Spinosaurid debate one exists with these two species and if Sauroniops is valid. Similiar to Spinosaurids the big issue is having enough specimens to make a proper determination in what exists.. For these reasons best identified as : Carcharodontosaurid indet. Theropod indet. There are also intermediate size teeth (1 1/2") that are being sold as Deltadromeus or another theropod. I believe these could be Deltadromeus teeth but until we see scientific evidence this morphology of tooth should be identified as Theropod indet. No skull was found with the holotype or in any other discoveries so we do not know what look like. Carcharodontosaurid serrations Theropod indet. Dromaeosaurid: Teeth being sold as Dromaeosaurus are most likely misidentified, so here is what to look for. There are a few morphologies floating around but nothing as been formally described. Teeth are typically small around 1/2" (1.2cm) to over 1" (2.5cm) One morphology of these teeth are suggested by Hendrickx to be from a Noasaurid dinosaur. Although you see many sellers using the word Raptor next to what they are offering it's unknown if there is a true raptor in the Kem Kem. Abelisaurids are not raptors This figure identifies a study of isolated teeth by Richter (2015) and identifies two morphologies (A to D) and (E to G) as Dromaeosaurid. Mesial and distal carinae show a distinct density difference in serrations. The tip of the tooth extends past the base. On morph E/F a faint but visible constriction between crown and root is visible. The later form suggested by some paleontologists is most similiar to troodontids. Morph variant 3 that I have in my collection but not seen in any papers Mesial and distal carinae range show a distinct difference. A distinct twist to the mesial carina. Abelisaurid indet. With new discoveries we can put a real species name to these teeth but currently they are indet. These are easily identifiable but can easily be misidentified with certain morphologies of Dromaeosaurid teeth. The teeth are very compressed, the cross-section is oval at the base, the mesial side is strongly curved and the distal side is almost straight to the base of the tooth, see red lines in the photo. Mesial and distal carinae range from only a slight to a distinct difference. The only morphological feature that discriminates a tooth of a dromaeosaurid from that of an abelisaurid is the unique mesial and distal curvature profile of the abelisaurid crown. These teeth could belong to Rugops since it's an Abelisaurid but we have no scientific information to support that claim. Premaxillary Bottom Line: There are NO theropod teeth in the Kem Kem Beds that you can currently definitively assign to a Genus to, no less a Species.
  10. Please, all opinions are welcome! In my bone box, I will have hit in my calculations this time? This time I'm pretty confident, because there's not a lot of other things it can be, besides the perfect morphology and hollow bone wall. I feel confident enough to call this of Thalassodromidae pterosaur undetermined. Do you agree with my ID? @Troodon @LordTrilobite
  11. Spinosaur Skull Bone!

    So I bought this piece on the internet... It was advertised as a croc limb from Kem Kem. Except it wasn't a croc limb. Upon closer inspection of the images, I figured this was a theropod quadrate bone instead of a croc limb. So now that it has arrived and I could get a proper look. I've come to the conclusion that I bought a part of a huge Spinosaurid skull. It doesn't look anything like the quadrates of Abelisaurs and Allosauroids, while it does show close similarities with those of Spinosaurids. It's a right-hand quadrate bone that is almost complete with an articulated quadratojugal fragment attached to the side. It's huge and must have come from a skull of well over a metre long. Articulated fossils from Kem Kem are really rare. And better yet, since I bought this as a croc limb, it was only like 60 euros. So needles to say, I'm quite happy with my accuisition. This will be a fun one to clean.
  12. Hello. Just another mosasaur jaw thread! This one puzzles me a little. Obviously it has the replaced teeth, as usual. But it doesn't look right to me. For starters, all of those straight edges. It looks an awful lot like a composite. Almost like three or four chunks of jaw cobbled together with some random skull bones. Am I being paranoid, could these be natural breaks? My experience tells me that jaws don't break along these straight lines, but I thought I'd throw it out there to see what people think. Thanks for your help.
  13. My Kem Kem Tooth Collection

    I just acquired some new specimens in my Moroccan Kem Kem dinosaur and reptile tooth collection. Thought i'd show you guys the lot. They are all from the Kem Kem/Tegana Formation near Taouz, Morocco. As you can see i love collecting dinosaur and reptile teeth from this area! The larger ones are incredibly rare and virtually non-existant at the formation nowadays. I'm quite proud of them! What do you guys think? P.S- that "Ankylosaur" tooth was infact looked at by Robert Bakker. He thinks it is from an Ankylosaur, which is ultra rare because no Ankylosaurs are known from the formation yet!
  14. Cetacean tooth?

    Hi folks Any idea on this tooth? Loos cetacean to me but wasn't aware cetaceans were found in Kem Kem.
  15. Doubts in Moroccan Odontopleurida

    Good morning guys, Any thoughts about this Leonaspis' species, taking into account the newly described species? What's the most updated info about this genus in Moroccan lands, please? 2,0 cm Thanks in advance to all, Miguel
  16. Doubts on Devonian Phacopids

    Hello, I think these are a Cornuproetus plus a Reedops? Am I right? They are from Atchana. If yes, are the species known? Thanks in advance to you all. Miguel
  17. Palaeocarcharodon orientalis (Sinzow 1899)

    From the album Pisces

    4cm. From the phosphate plateau in Khouribga, Morocco. Palaeocene.
  18. Kem Kem bone ID

    I know I should recognise this bone. I'm sure I've seen one just like it before, perhaps on this very forum, but an image search drew a blank. It's very distinctive. It has a completely flat, lobe shaped surface that it stands up on perfectly. 4.5cm long. Any pointers would be appreciated. Standing upon the flat surface: Flat surface sloping on the left:
  19. Hello. Could someone please help me with a guess? What bone is this? And the probable animal that may have belonged? All opinions are welcome! Thank you!
  20. Kem Kem Bone Spike/Horn?

    I recently bought a whole bunch of chunkosaur pieces. Most unidentifiable. But there was some interesting stuff in there as well. This piece in particular looks interesting. At first glance it looks like just a chunk of bone. But then I noticed that most sides still show the outside cortical bone without much damage. The two main sides which are both subtly rounded, are vertically straight and seem to converge into a point. The whole thing is roughly cone shaped. Viewing it from the pointed end it is roughly oval shaped. There is a flat bit on the "underside" of the cone. The bone structure is very dense on one side and very rugose and open near the tip and the other side of the bone, indicating possible fast growth or remodeling. The broken inside also shows a lot of open spaces and air pockets. Now the problem is, that this looks to me like some kind of spike or horn. But I don't know of anything in the Kem Kem beds that has these kinds of structures. Crocodiles have scutes and such, but this piece doesn't resemble armour as it doesn't seem dense enough. Ankylosaurs have spikes, but those aren't present in Kem Kem and their armour is denser as well. The closest thing I could find with a similar shape, was the brow horn of Carnotaurus, which is also not present in Kem Kem. It's a really weird shape that I can't seem to place. Any ideas? Side and "top" rounded surface with dense bone. Other side view and the other rounded side. Cross section of dense bone. "bottom". And broken tip of the "spike". Details.
  21. Moroccan Mosasaur teeth

    Recently collected a few mosasaur teeth near Bakrit Morocco late Cretaceous
  22. Adam's Cambrian

    A rangeomorph holdfast trace fossil from the Ediacara formation, Rawnsley quartzite of the Flinders Range, South Australia. This specimen is Medusina mawsoni, so called because it was until recently thought to be a jellyfish, but is now believed to be the attachment point of a fractal rangeomorph as Charniodiscus is the point of anchorage for Charnia sp. This one may have been the holdfast point for some species of Rangea. The diameter of the outer circle is 1.5 cm and the fossil is estimated to be 555 million years old.
  23. Kem Kem Raptor Humerus

    I bought a number of cool little Kem Kem fossils recently. There's a number of quite interesing ones in there. One of them turned out to be pretty special. As far as I know Dromaeosaurid material is pretty rare in the Kem Kem beds. But this seems to be the upper part of a right humerus of a raptor. Other Theropods are generally pretty different and those of birds while more similar also don't match. the bone is obviously hollow but the bone wall is still fairly substantial, which makes me think its Dromaeosaur instead of bird. The bone is also almost identical in shape and size to the humerus of the small Dromaeosaurid Bambiraptor. Though mine is obviously not as complete, but still very nicely preserved in 3D. I feel confident enough to call this raptor that I wanted to share this with you guys. Bambiraptor humerus. Needless to say, I'm really happy with this piece.
  24. 4 Moroccan teeth

    Hi all, At the local market yesterday I bought these 4 teeth (in total for a very low price). All 4 are said to come from Morocco, but the seller didn't say the exact location. But I suppose that they are either from Kem Kem or Khouribga. Anyways I would just like your opinion on them (what species, 100% original or slightly reconstructed, anything I could do to "improve" them, etc). Thanks in advance! Best regards, Max Tooth #1: sold as a spinosaur tooth (so I suppose it's from Kem Kem).
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