Search the Community: Showing results for tags 'morocco'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Hey Everyone :P
  • fossil maniac's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians
    • Corals
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Ammonoids & Nautiloids
    • Bivalves
    • Coleoids
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Bony Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates

Found 254 results

  1. Hello good morning to all! Are these bones bones of pterosaurs? Thanks everyone for the help! https://img4.hostingpics.net/pics/4842736408.png https://img4.hostingpics.net/pics/2357047211.png https://img4.hostingpics.net/pics/4344284011.png https://img4.hostingpics.net/pics/7976151408.png https://img4.hostingpics.net/pics/3861086508.png
  2. Tooth of a ray.
  3. Tooth of a ray.
  4. A partial left dentary (lower jaw) of a small mosasaur. On the side there is a large pathology visible on the bone surface.
  5. Anyone know the species of this fish? Skull is 3D and BIG. Thanks
  6. The seller of this piece claims that the teeth are not composited onto the matrix, but, judging by this picture, I would say the roots aren't original. They lack texture and the one on the left in the close-up seems 'smudged' up onto the bone. I would imagine the block has original bone but most of the teeth added afterwards, but I may of course be wrong. Can someone more experienced please give their opinion? Either way, it looks like a great piece to me, if a bit out of my price range! Many thanks.
  7. From the album Trilobites

    Taxonomy: Flexicalymene ouzregui (two specimens) Age: Ordovician Location: Anti-Atlas Mtns, Morocco Source: Purchased
  8. This is my first post ... patience please. I collect amber with insects under normal circumstances. I have inherited a box of different fossil teeth from a relative. I am told the pieces are from Morocco he brought back in the early 70's. The more I read and research online, the more I hear "fake Moroccan fossils". I have no idea but would like to confirm either way. I have followed several threads on this site researching this. If these are real, how is quality determined? Do I need to clean them up or will I damage them? I find a tremendous range in pricing online. I collect amber and know how to value quality but this is a different thing to me. I assume I need to get past the "fake" issue first. I can see what I think is repair (maybe glue or epoxy) on some of the teeth from being broken but not sure. There are quite a few pieces. Any help would be appreciated thanks B
  9. Over the past 2 to 2 1/2 years I have been assembling this collection of Cretaceous set. I was directly inspired by TFF user Andy, who made a set of the apex predators of the Cretaceous seas and waterways with many of the same species featured in this collection. I would like to give credit to him for this collection idea. Obviously I couldn't travel to Niger, Morocco, or even Kansas, travel is expensive and time is limited. I will plan to go to Kansas one day as my dream location, but for now, Ohio will do. While this isn't complete, I added fossils from some of my favorite prehistoric creatures. As a fossil hunter/collector, I find that marine reptile and fish teeth interest me the most. The species are as follows; Onchopristus numidus Tegana formation, Kem Kem Beds, Taouz, Morocco. acquired in the summer of 2016. This is the only piece of mine that has any repairs. In the future I'll search for one without repairs.
  10. 'Last African dinosaur' discovered in Moroccan mine University of Bath, May 3, 2017‎ http://www.bath.ac.uk/research/news/2017/05/03/last-african-dino/ https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170503213550.htm Morocco dinosaur fossil find 'like winning the lottery' Irvine Times - ‎May 4, 2017‎ http://www.irvinetimes.com/news/15264325.Morocco_dinosaur_fossil_find____like_winning_the_lottery___/ African T. rex was one of last dinosaurs alive before extinction New Scientist - ‎May 3, 2017‎ https://www.newscientist.com/article/2129767-african-t-rex-was-one-of-last-dinosaurs-alive-before-extinction/ Longrich, N.R., Pereda-Suberbiola, X., Jalil, N.E., Khaldoune, F. and Jourani, E., 2017. An abelisaurid from the latest Cretaceous (late Maastrichtian) of Morocco, North Africa. Cretaceous Research. DOI: 10.1016/j.cretres.2017.03.021 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195667116303706 Yours, Paul H.
  11. Hello! Good Night to everyone who participates in my favorite Forum! I present to you the newest member of my collection... It was discovered in Kem Kem, Morocco. Very good condition, although there are natural cracks in the enamel these do not appear to have been glued or restored. But I do not think it's a Rebbachisaurus tooth... What do you think? Thank you all!
  12. From the album Dinosaur teeth

    Theropod indet. Cretaceous (Cenomanian) Kem Kem Beds, Morocco Perfect tooth measuring an inch long. Unsure of what type of theropod it is so if anyone has any ideas I would appreciate any input.
  13. Updated 3/25/17 Although a lot of this has already been posted on a number of topics, I thought consolidation it might prove useful with some additional information. If you're planning to purchase theropod teeth from Morocco's Kem Kem Beds or already have some in your collection check this out. Moroccan theropods are poorly understood and not a lot has been published. Very few articulated skeletons have been found and most are partial and without a skull. There is also lots of mis-information, mostly unintentional, from some dealers but especially online auction sites. Unfortunately these are the most misidentified commercially sold dinosaur fossil around. Please post your interest here on the forum before you buy. Background: The Kem Kem Beds also known as the ‘‘Continental Intercalaire’’ or "Continental Red Beds" is composed of three formations: Akrabou, Aoufous and Ifezouane Formation. The latter two are the dinosaur producing sediments with the Ifezouane being the principal one. They are Cenomanian in age. The attached drawing gives a representation how they lay. The distribution of the different groups of fossils in the Ifezouane Formation can been see in the pie chart below. Dinosaurs make up a small percentage of what is collected. So first lets identify what is known to the best of my knowledge. Theropods that have been described across North Africa (focus on large bodied theropods) Theropods that have been described in Kem Kem: (family) Spinosaurus aegyptiacus * (Spinosaurid) *Some paleontologist believe this species is unique to Egypt and Kem Kem material should be identified as Spinosauid indet. Lots of questions exist over Ibrahim (2014) diagnosis which validated this species. Carcharodontosaurus saharicus (Carcharodontosaurid) Deltadromeus agilis (Neovenatorid) Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis (Spinosaurid) Sauroniops pachytholus (Carcharodontosaurid) Theropods that have not been described from the Kem Kem but isolated teeth exist and have been reflected in scientific papers: Dromaeosaurid sp.? Hendrickx suggested these are actually Noasaurid indet. Abelisaurid indet. Theropod teeth that are sold commercially but no scientific evidence yet to link them to the Kem Kem: Abelisaurus sp. (Not described from North Africa) Rugops sp. (Only described from Niger) Bahariasaurus sp. (Only described from Egypt) Elaphrosaurus sp. (From Jurassic of Tanzania) So what is being sold and what are the issues? Spinosaurid teeth are well understood by both collector and dealers, see photo. Issues are typically associated with restoration and compositing a larger tooth from multiple teeth. Teeth with matrix attached to them are suspect for restoration so be careful. At least two species of Spinosaurids exits and it's currently impossible to determine if they are Spinosaurus or Sigilmassasaurus or ?. Best identified as: Spinosaurid indet. Carcharodontosaurid teeth, those that are compressed and blade like, first photo. Wrinkles by the distal carina are diagnostic to this species. Mesial teeth are fat, slender and look very different (D shaped) (next three photos). Two species currently are described and it's impossible to differentiate between the two. Best identified as : Carcharodontosaurid indet. Theropod indet. There are also intermediate size teeth (1 1/2") that are being sold as Deltadromeus or another theropod. I believe these could be Deltadromeus teeth but until we see scientific evidence this morphology of tooth should be identified as Theropod indet. No skull was found with the holotype or in any other discoveries so we do not know what look like. Carcharodontosaurid serrations Theropod indet. Dromaeosaurus teeth... most all being sold are not, so here is what to look for. Teeth are typically small around 1/2" (1.2cm), recurved and there is a distinct difference in the serrations on both edges. These teeth are suggested by Hendrickx to be from a Noasaurid dinosaur. We currently do not have scientific evidence of a dromaeosaurid in this fauna. Although you see many sellers using the word Raptor next to what they are offering it's unknown if there is a true raptor in the Kem Kem. Abelisaurus teeth... This species does not exist in the Kem Kem but the teeth being sold as that are actually Abelisaurid indet. With new discoveries we can put a real species name to these teeth. These are easily identifiable. The teeth are very compressed, the cross-section is oval at the base, the mesial side is strongly curved and the distal side is almost straight to the base of the tooth, see red lines in the photo. These teeth are typically around an inch long but I've seen them up to 2 inches. These teeth could belong to Rugops since it's an Abelisaurid but we have no scientific information to support that claim. Bottom Line: There are NO theropod teeth in the Kem Kem Beds that you can currently assign to a Genus to, no less a Species.
  14. MAR Author&journal credibility:very high i will not post images of the fish here,but they are stunning. Instead I went for the invertebrates Textuallly speaking,this caught my eye: "A few fragments of fern fronds (Fig. 14) were encountered with additional examples seen in fossil dealers’ storehouses in Erfoud on a similar matrix. All are preserved as orange/brown goethite films similar to those encountered in plants from the Crato Formation of Brazil" NB:"After submission of this paper Cavin et al. (2010) published a paper in which the Gara Sbaa locality is discussed in the context of other Moroccan Early Cretaceous vertebrate assemblages, referring to the Gara Sbaa assemblage as the Agoulti assemblage."
  15. Back in September I posted My Jurassic Park - Theropod Claws from the Kem Kem, the link is attached and now this topic is its continuation. http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/57318-my-jurassic-park-theropod-claws-from-the-kem-kem/ There is more to the Kem Kem than just Theropod Claws (my passion) and I would like to share that with you. The Kem Kem beds consists of three formation: Ifezouane, Aoufous and Akrabou and most of the Dinosaur material comes from there but not all and I'll share a few examples of that. The Kem Kem beds are not a large area in Morocco and I've attached a map to give everyone a good understanding of that and where they are geographically. The best fossils come near the border with Algeria but most of these collecting areas are depleted and today diggers are going to more remote areas. The Kem Kem Region Lets begin with my favorite Spinosaurus aegypticacus (sp.) The most impressive feature of this dinosaur are the spines so here is a Dorsal and a close up of the process area. 3ft (.9m) High A complete Caudal Vertebra is next and this one is 18" (46cm) High My collection includes a partial Dentary with 6 associated un-erupted teeth. . The jaw is 14" long. The teeth can be massive and here are a few examples
  16. A couple of days ago I bought a couple of dozen pieces of random Kem Kem material (I suppose you'd call it the junk that couldn't be sold individually). I know that Kem Kem is a bit mysterious, and that it can be difficult or impossible to identify random bits of bone even to the type of bone, let alone the specific animal. But what that said, that's exactly what I'm hoping someone can do I could identify quite a lot of the pieces, such as sawfish teeth, a piece of shark fin spine, and some fish verts. But most of it is just a mystery. Can anyone help with these bits? This first bone is hollow. Does this mean anything, in this context? The second has a characteristic shape, and I was wondering if that meant it could be narrowed down to the type of bone? The third is just a very robust bone. I don't know if anything can be gleamed from it. Finally, this looks like some sort of scale. Fish? Thanks very much in advance.
  17. I'm trying to unravel a Kem Kem turtle mystery at the moment, but in the meantime, I have these two verts that I find myself unable to ID. Which is annoying, because I thought I'd be better able to do so, using the resources of this forum. The first, I suspect to be some kind of croc, but I don't know enough to be sure. I think it's all original - there are several repaired breaks, but I strongly suspect that they are all original bits. I have searched all over, but can't see anything that looks 100% like it, particularly in terms of the neural arch going straight up like that. Please can anyone ID it? It's 6 inches tall, 3.5 inches wide. The second one is pretty big, 6 inches long. I was hoping this would prove to be theropod, but there are no processes evident to help with ID. Thanks
  18. I'm calling in the Theropod experts for this one! I'm looking for an ID for this vertebrae, or whether the seller's ID is correct, or wishful thinking. The ID/Location information is below and is exactly as it is shown online by the seller. Since there's SoOoOo much conclusive research on Moroccan Theropods this one should be a breeze . Can this vert truly be labeled as anything more than Theropod indet? Currently the seller is labeling this vert as belonging to Rugops Primus. For size reference this vert is 4cm long. I don't own this fossil so I am currently limited to the couple of side view shots provided by the seller. Information: Cretaceous Theropod (Raptor) Tail (Caudal) Vertebra - Rugops primus Tegana Formation, Aptian Kem Kem Basin, Morocco, North Africa Creataceous - 100 Million Years Old
  19. Hi there, I bought this nice dinosaur bone from the Kem Kem basin in Morocco. Just wondering if a rough ID is possible? The seller said it looked like a rib bone but wasn't sure. Is it a theropod or crocodylomorph? It's had some repairs done to it; few gaps filled here and there. All suggestions are much appreciated. Thank you!
  20. I've been going through some Kem Kem material and trying to identify some of it, which I know is difficult even for someone that knows what they're doing. I don't, at all, but I am reasonably confident on a few bits - I wondered if anyone would be kind enough to give their opinions on my tentative IDs? 1. First of all, and definitely very tentatively, I was hoping that this was pterosaur. Wishful thinking? It's hollow and splits off in two directions at the end. 2. Secondly, this tooth - I'm daring to dream that it might be... sauropod? It only has a tiny bit of enamel left on it, but I'm going by the heavily blunted shape. Knowing me, it's probably a very poor Spinosaurus. 3 - Fish jaw #1 - I'm not at all sure about this, but it has a row of little 'post holes' that I assumed might be for teeth. But I have no idea. Has all sorts of suggestive shapes and ridges. 4. Fish Jaw #2 - this must be a fish jaw, but can anyone suggest what type of fish? 5 - Mystery tooth - at first I thought this was a scrap of bone, but upon closer examination it is clearly a tooth. The shape seems odd to me, it's very triangular, but I have very little experience with teeth to be fair. One end is very, very slightly (a couple of mm) smaller than the other, but there is no visible curvature on any edge. It needs prepping since it's still covered in matrix on every side, but I was wondering if the triangular shape was suggestive of anything. You can just make out the row of serrations on the photo below, along the top, so it must be theropod. 6. A small limb bone from a theropod maybe? The bone is hollow and oval. Needs more prep really, when my workshop is back in action. 7. Crocodile scute. I know that this is some kind of armour, but where were these plates positioned? Down the back? And were they just below the skin? Took a lot of prep to get it this far! Sorry, I didn't set out to post so many bits. Any conformation/refutation/information appreciated. Paul
  21. Trilobite from the Tiskaouine Alnif area , Atlas Mountains, Morocco. (purchased from trusted dealer)
  22. The newest addition to our dinosaur fossil collection from the Kem Kem Beds in Morocco, a rooted Spinosaurid tooth. It is 6 inches in length, and really shows the strength and size of this animal. There is some cool feed wear on the tip as well. This one is for my 7 year old son, and will be in his Easter basket on Sunday morning. Spinosaurus is is favorite dinosaur, and he's going to go bananas! Can't wait to see the look on his face! .
  23. Hi everybody, I moved my attention to this item, the price is around 550 USD. I would like your advice if the tooth is real and if the price is too high. Thank you all Greetings
  24. Hi Guys, Wanted to ping the brain trust. This tooth was listed as a Carcharocles auriculatus from Morocco ...... the serrations look more like a Paleocarcharodon orientalis from Morocco to me. Though I'm not familiar with the morphology or variation in these teeth so I was curious what others thought. It's a bit small so there's that as well. Thanks, Brett
  25. I recently bought a whole bunch of chunkosaur pieces. Most unidentifiable. But there was some interesting stuff in there as well. This piece in particular looks interesting. At first glance it looks like just a chunk of bone. But then I noticed that most sides still show the outside cortical bone without much damage. The two main sides which are both subtly rounded, are vertically straight and seem to converge into a point. The whole thing is roughly cone shaped. Viewing it from the pointed end it is roughly oval shaped. There is a flat bit on the "underside" of the cone. The bone structure is very dense on one side and very rugose and open near the tip and the other side of the bone, indicating possible fast growth or remodeling. The broken inside also shows a lot of open spaces and air pockets. Now the problem is, that this looks to me like some kind of spike or horn. But I don't know of anything in the Kem Kem beds that has these kinds of structures. Crocodiles have scutes and such, but this piece doesn't resemble armour as it doesn't seem dense enough. Ankylosaurs have spikes, but those aren't present in Kem Kem and their armour is denser as well. The closest thing I could find with a similar shape, was the brow horn of Carnotaurus, which is also not present in Kem Kem. It's a really weird shape that I can't seem to place. Any ideas? Side and "top" rounded surface with dense bone. Other side view and the other rounded side. Cross section of dense bone. "bottom". And broken tip of the "spike". Details.