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Found 227 results

  1. Hi all, New here and to the fossil collecting world--- since I was little I always loved dinosaurs and traces of the past and this is probably some of the farthest back we can reach... so, finally now looking to start up a collection with a good first dinosaur tooth. Not going to spend T-Rex money or anything like that at first so my range would be for a more common type of tooth but still in nice collectable condition. Been looking at several types... like Charcharodontosaurus, Allosaurus, possibly any of the so-called "raptor" types and this is one I've come up with that appears to be a good example of the latter; The description goes: "Pristine example of the rare giant raptor tooth,This tooth is pristine,beautiful enamel,serrated and complete with no repair or restoration.Tooth measures 45 mm Mid-Cretaceous Albian Age Kem-Kem Basin, South of Taouz , K’Sar es Souk Province , Morocco" To my newbie eyes it appears to be in nice condition and possibly also quite large for this species (?)... what do you think? Does the species label ring true and would this be a good starter? Any help would be greatly appreciated! Andreas
  2. I've been cleaning up this block of Moroccan material, and have exposed most of the central bone. I have no idea what it is, despite the fact that it looks very distinctive. Does anybody have any ideas please? Judging by the size, I would guess it could be mosasaur, but I don't know if the teeth have been placed or were there originally. Numerous fish bones are also present, as usual. Thanks in advance.
  3. These have been a long time coming but they arrived just yesterday. These are fish concretions from Morocco. Ive never had any experience with these and have only seen about 3 fish from Morocco that are any good, so this is truly a gamble. But if you don't gamble, you cant win. Im going to go on the prep attack on one of these today and see what happens. im excited and nervous at the same time. Wish me luck. RB
  4. @hxmendoza is one of the foremost dinosaur claw experts I know. I spoke to him several days ago about the "typical" dinosaur claw we see from Kem Kem. He pointed out something interesting. Let me know your thoughts!
  5. From the album Nigel's album

  6. From the album Nigel's album

  7. From the album Nigel's album

    3.65"
  8. From the album Nigel's album

  9. While browsing ... Pulled from an online site and removed from their original context to protect the innocent. It was mentioned in the description that they may have been broken and 'cemented' back together. Hunh ... ya think ? Mary Shelley would be proud though.
  10. Hello everyone, I mounted this skull, but I'm not sure you have identified the species. I think it's Mosasaurus prognathodon, but I see a strong resemblance Eremiasaurus Heterodontus. What do you think? thank you Snen
  11. Hi everyone...I have taken these two teeth from Morocco that should be of Spinosaurus. Any information is accept. Thanks
  12. I was hoping some of our Mosasaur experts (@LordTrilobite @jnoun11) could lend me their opinion on the following Mosasaur from Morocco I want to purchase. I was told it is Prognathodon, agree?
  13. The attached photos show a vertebra, probably from a dinosaur (theropod according to a very experienced collector, but no reference given) or crocodile from the Kem Kem beds in Morocco. The bone is 9,5 cm long and 9,0 cm tall. Any help to identify it to family, genus or species will be most appreciated.
  14. Hi! I would like to exchange these fossils for Miocene material or Mesozoic/Cenozoic echinoids/corals. Unfortunately, I can only trade with european members. 1-Mosasaur teeth;spinosaur tooth;otodus obliquus tooth (if you need more info, please pm me).
  15. Note: I won't post any pictures here because even with censoring and cropping, the dealer/website is too easily identifiable. As if buying properly identified fossils couldn't get any harder, I was just directed to a extremely professional website that had whole sections on identification of fake fossils, how to identify between various Moroccan dinosaurs, even books on the topic! Every fossil sold there had its own page giving details of said fossil and why it was identified as that particular species etc. I did a search on the raptor section. Less than 10% were true dromaeosaurids. What grates me is that any uninformed buyer would look at the website and go, "They sure know their stuff. Wow! I even get a certificate of authenticity on my fossil!" Cue a buyer spending wasted money. There is great misinformation today in the fossil market, especially Moroccan ones. Sometimes, both diggers and dealers are mistaken about the ID of their fossils thanks to too much hearsay and information passed down from one another. To sum it up: 1) A professional-looking website doesn't guaranteed good IDs 2) Certificates mean nothing. Anyone can print one out 3) Even if a dealer/website tries to teach you how to identify a wrongly-IDed fossil, ensure they practice what they preach. This website pointed out correctly that for raptors, the inner serrations were larger than outer ones. The teeth he sold however, did not follow this rule. Most likely he copied it from somewhere 4) The dealer being a member of AAPS doesn't mean he knows what he's selling 5) "Everyone else is unreliable! Getting from us is the only way to make sure you know you are getting the correct fossil! We visit the dig sites ourselves, we vet every specimen." Sounds familiar? Some dealers resort to fear tactics to make themselves the only legit-looking source. 6) Raptors, dinosaur eggs, tyrannosaurids are some of the fossils that are harder to properly identify. When buying one, be extra cautious about the ID If in doubt, take some pics and show it to the forums. There are plenty of experts here, we are more than happy to help spot for fakes. As the saying goes, caveat emptor "let the buyer beware".
  16. I obtained this partial crocodile skull and jaw some time ago, and haven't done anything with it yet. It's from Morocco, and was sold as sarcosuchus, though I imagine it's actually dyrosaurus. No idea whether it's just one specimen, or a mixture of bits. The teeth are glued on. Several of the pieces are also so fragile that they basically crumble when touched. Is there a method I should be using to stabilise them? I know very little about crocs, but I would love to get this to some kind of displayable state. I can digitally sculpt and 3D print missing pieces later, but my main problem at this stage is actually understanding what I have. Many of the bits are - and I assume will remain - unknown bone fragments, but many are large and identifiable - with the right references and knowledge (which I don't yet posses). Is there any advice that anyone could offer which isn't "put it in a box and forget about it"? I appreciate that I must sound like an idiot to people that know their stuff - my specialism is ammonites, which I can prep to a very high standard, but the only vertebrates you find around here are ichthyosaurs. I don't exactly need my hand held, but a few pointers would be very much appreciated!
  17. I recently acquired some bulk samples of shark teeth from Morocco. Quite a lot of them appear to be Sand Tigers or Sand sharks (Odontaspididae). I'm working on collecting references to ID these teeth before assembling tooth sets. Since teeth from Morocco are so common, I thought this would be a useful resource for others. I'm just starting out and this reference is a good place to start: ARAMBOURG, C. (1952) Les vertébrés fossiles des gisements de phosphates (Maroc-Algérie-Tunisie). Notes et Mémoires du Service Géologique du Maroc, 92: 1–372, 62 fig., 44 pl Although it is in French and I believe a lot of the taxonomy has probably progressed from this time. Is there already a post on this topic? If not I would sure appreciate contributions of references for shark teeth for this locality. There may also be references from other localities that are relevant as they deal with species found in the Moroccan deposits. After some time we could organise references into something that makes sense taxonomically and if there is a demand for it maybe pin it. Thanks everyone!
  18. Hey guys this is my koneprussia that has spines on spines!
  19. The plesiosaur has long been one of my favorite prehistoric creatures of all, especially after reading tales of the Loch Ness Monster. I've always wanted a jaw from one, thankfully @StevenJDennis recently scouted this beauty for me from Tucson. I estimate roughly 30% restoration, mainly to the rear portion of the joint(?) and some filler. Also, majority of the teeth have been planted from Zarafasaura oceanis, another elasmosaur. Still, he's earned a spot as one of my showpiece fossils. He measures 17 inches long and 7 inches wide. Plesiosaur Mandible Elasmosauridae (Libonectes atlasense Buchy, 2005) 94.3 - 89.3 million years old | Turonian, late Cretaceous Akrabou Formation Asfla Village, Goulmima, Errachidia Province, Morocco I assume this is an erupting tooth
  20. I am examining a labial section of the maxilla with 6 alveoli, it breaks off at the anterior fenestra, includes a part of the antorbital fossa, and also a part of the external naris. It's from Morocco, the Kem Kems more specifically, and that's the most information I've got on its origin, unfortunately. It's quite heavy -- dense, more specifically -- and it seems to match up as Spinosaurine anatomically. It comes with unoriginal teeth which I'm going to most likely remove in order to check for adhesives to make sure they're not original by shining it under UV light. What are some other ways to test for signs of artificial tampering with the fossil? Is there anything I should look out for in particular? I'd prefer not to attach pictures as I do not own the bone. Edit: Additionally, the bone has a rather shiny appearance, almost a translucence. I was wondering if this was the result of polishing? It is orange-red-brown, which seems to match up with the iron oxide found in the Kem Kem formation.
  21. Hi there. I got a large lot of teeth from Morocco today. They were mostly shark, but with quite a large number of mosasaur teeth, some ray plates, crocodile teeth, bone material etc. There are several pieces I couldn't identify, but this is the most puzzling one of the lot. It's obviously (to a layperson like me, and keeping in mind that I don't have a clue) a mammalian tooth. As such, it can't be contemporary to the other material. However, it does have lots of matrix jammed into the top of the tooth, which is solid rock and not just sand. It's indistinguishable from the typical phosphate bed matrix, to my eyes. My guess would still be that it's fairly modern, but does anybody have any ideas please? Thanks in advance.
  22. I bought this Trilobite from Morocco about 11 years ago. I know there are many fakes out there, so I am asking for your opinions. There is a repaired crack through the center of the matrix which made me believe that it was real. You can see the crack in the photo, it goes from the upper left, through the trilobite, and over to center right. If it is real, is the black color natural to this type of trilobite from Morocco or has it been painted?
  23. Hi All, While perusing the web I came across this Spino tooth that I would like some second opinions on. It's a good size tooth and I am wondering whether the root is authentic or if maybe this is a composite tooth. Any thoughts? Thanks as always!
  24. Hey all, Here are some two verts I have from Khouribga (Morocco). They both look very similar, so I have a good suspicion they are from the same species. Any clue what species it is? I was thinking sea snake ( Palaeophis maghrebianus), but I'm not sure. Also, I'm not sure whether it's Paleocene or Cretaceous. Please help! Best regards, Max
  25. Hello everybody I have some indeterminated Kem Kem fossils. The first one is a piece of a jaw. I think it's reptile, but I don't know for sure. Anyone suggestions? (first 2 pics) The second is also a jaw and I think this one might be a fish. (last 3 pics) Thanks already