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Found 470 results

  1. I picked up this tooth a few days. It was in a bin with plesiosaur teeth. But this one was much different. It's 2" long. One carinae, that is not serrated, likely on the mesial side. The other side is rounded. Faint striations that run up the tooth from the base, but slowly fade away towards the crown. I'm not an expert on mosasaurs, looking for help on ID.
  2. Hi everybody, I've seen this spino vertebra. I don't see any red flag but I'm not a great expert. The price is near 300$ . Thanks
  3. Good afternoon for all, in the greater Forum Fossil of the world ! Unfortunately the seller does not have much information regarding this bone. It is described in the advertisement simply as African unidentified bone of reptile, Kem Kem. Any help what that might be? Thanks for all the help!
  4. Moroccan ammonites ID help

    Hello guys, does anyone knows the species of this ammonite from the Moroccan Anti-Atlas? Thanks in advance, Miguel
  5. Moroccan Lichida doubts

    Hello there, besides the Ceratarges koumalli, C. aries and C. ziregensis, described by Van Viersen et al toJbel Zireg, what more Ceratarges species are already recognized and described to Morocco? @piranha Thanks in advance, Miguel
  6. Carcharodontosaurus Tooth from Morocco

    I had found this tooth for sale while looking in a antique mall in Virginia. The tooth appears to be in good condition, which is apparent due to the serrations still being present. And thanks to some members from this forum, it’s likely that the tooth was a tooth that would be set and ready to take a place of another tooth if it ever fell off. The tooth is also likely to have belonged to a younger animal, juvenile or sub adult is probably where the age is somewhere around.
  7. I bought this tooth from a antique mall when I was back in Virginia for a bit, and while the tooth has quite a lot of info and is in good condition, before I try to add it anywhere here. I wanna know if this tooth is real or even from a different species. (Which I highly doubt)
  8. Hello. Good afternoon to everyone here of my favorite forum! I just bought this. But the only thing the seller knows is that came from Morocco, North Africa, but the exact location, geological formation, unfortunately the seller does not know. But due to the fragmentation of red sand, I particularly suspect that this fossil is from Kem Kem. But what is this? Enchodus partial jaw section and tooth fossil? I do not know! Is this 100% real or a compound? Thank you for your help! @Troodon @Tidgy's Dad @Foozil @hxmendoza @RJB @caldigger
  9. coltraneia.jpg

    From the album Trilobites

    Coltraneia oufatenensis (Morzadec 2001) Devonian Purchased Crisp eye lenses and large palpebral area. Slight repair along diagonal discovery crack. Just overall awesome.
  10. Welcome to my first Fossil ID Post! I bought this fossil at a Market in Johannesburg. The seller claims it to be a juvenile Mosasaur. The sediment layer seems to be derived from seabed but I am no expert. Seller claims to have retrieved the specimen from Morocco. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Reptilia Order: Squamata Clade: Platynota
  11. Otodus obliquus (Agassiz 1843)

    From the album Pisces

    3cm. Eocene. From the Phosphate Beds at Qued Zem, Khouribga, Morocco.
  12. Squalicorax pristodontus (Agassiz 1843)

    From the album Pisces

    2cm. Eocene. From the Phosphate Beds at Qued Zem, Khouribga, Morocco.
  13. Moroccan Cretaceous fish

    I was told this fish nodule came from the Anti-Atlas region of Morocco, and is supposedly Cretaceous in age. Can anyone ID it?
  14. There is quite of bit Kem Kem dinosaur material coming on the market and some of it quite good. Will try address the identification issue on some items so at least you will know what your bidding on. This appears to match quite well with a Spinosaurid ilium, seller calls it a pelvic bone. Looks quite nice, complete with a concern are the areas circled in white. Not sure it's bone or matrix. Seller does comment on filled fractures and some are visible but that should not detract from the piece. What the seller is offering here is a Spinosaurus phalanx and claw toe bones. What I believe you have here is a Spinosaurid foot claw and a carpal (hand bone). So think about this listing as two separate bones not associated in any way. This is a listing of a Spinosaurus complete finger with claw. What I believe you have are 3 carpals from a Spinosaurid that are completely unassociated and are not a good match as a composite. Hard to say much about the claw other that it appears to be a foot claw of what cannot determine with photos provided. Again like the one above if you're interested in this bid it as 4 separate items. Seller has this as a Spinosaurus phalanx toe bone. I find it difficult to call this one since its a partial but looks more like a carpal. I dont think you can ID this to any specific critter, not much diagnostic and we know so little. Seller is offering these as 4 Spinosaurus phalanx toe bones. The two on the left look like carpals, probably from a Spinosaurid. The one on the far right is a phalanx but it's hard to determine from what dinosaur. The second from the right to fragmented to say. Seller here has 4 Spinosaurus phalanx toe bone for sale. They are toe bones and may be from Spinosaurid but who knows there are lots of other theropods in this region and identifying isolated bones is very difficult. If interested they should be identified as theropod indeterminate. Being offered as a Spinosaurus phalanx toe bone. It might be from a Spinosaurid but have same comments as above
  15. Gerastos tuberculatus marocensis

    From the album Trilobites

    Gerastos tuberculatus marocensis Devonian Jebel Marakib, Tafraoute, Morocco Full, partially prone, nicely inflated pustular glabella. This is a common proetid. Specimen is roughly over an inch. (This is a lower resolution image at 113 kb - the higher resolution image of 1.5 mb will not upload at this time).
  16. Adam's Cambrian

    A rangeomorph holdfast trace fossil from the Ediacara formation, Rawnsley quartzite of the Flinders Range, South Australia. This specimen is Medusina mawsoni, so called because it was until recently thought to be a jellyfish, but is now believed to be the attachment point of a fractal rangeomorph as Charniodiscus is the point of anchorage for Charnia sp. This one may have been the holdfast point for some species of Rangea. The diameter of the outer circle is 1.5 cm and the fossil is estimated to be 555 million years old.
  17. hy mosasaurs lovers i looked around on differents americans fossils web sites , and i found ,is nowhere a description or list about different species of mosasaurs from morocco . so I'll try humbly to fix it . feel free to correct me if you see something wrong. the moroccan phosphate history began in 1921 , Moroccan phosphate mines operate three layers of phosphates ,. level 1 : ypresian phosphate bed level 2 : thanetian phosphate bed level 3 ; maestrichian phosphate bed level 4 ; maestrichian grey phosphate only at sidi-chenan quarry of courses , mosasaurs belong to the level 3.and 4 different species are studied by scientists of the French Museum of Natural History in Paris . today the last record of different mosasaurs species is at list 17 and probably 20. (personal opinion ) listed like below : †Halisaurus. arambourgi .(Bardet, Pereda Suberbiola, Iarochène, Bouya & Amaghzaz, 2005) †Halisaurus.sp not described yet †Halisaurus walkeri .(Lingham-Solier, 1998) ( i used this name temporarily, until one studie about this mosasaur show-up ) †Prognathodon sp Dollo, 1889 †Prognathodon anceps ex leiodon anceps slender form massive form perhaps sexual dimorphism ( personal opinion ) †Prognathodon solvay Dollo, 1889 †prognathodon hudae kaddumi 2009 †Prognathodon. currii (Christiansen & Bonde, 2002) †Eremiasaurus heterodontus , gen. et sp. nov sp ( AR. H. LeBlanc, M. W. Caldwell, and N. Bardet. 2012) †“Mosasaurus" baugei Arambourg 1954 ( Mosasaurus beaugei Arambourg, 1952 (Squamata, Mosasauridae) from the Late Cretaceous phosphates of Morocco Nathalie Bardet , Xabier Pereda Suberbiola , Mohamed Iarochene , Fatima Bouyahyaoui , Baadi Bouya , Mbarek Amaghzaz . 2004 ) †Mosasaurus hoffmanni Mantell, 1829 †Tylosaurus Marsh, 1872 slender form like tylosaurus proriger massive form like hainosaurus personal constatation †Platecarpus ptychodon Arambourg 1954 †Globidens. phosphaticus (Bardet, Pereda Suberbiola, Iarochène, Amalik & Bouya, 2005) †carinodens belgicus ( N. Bardet, X. Pereda Suberbiola, M. Iarochène, M. Amalik, and B. Bouya. 2005) †carinodens minalmamar. (A.S. Schulp, N. Bardet& B. Bouya. 2009) †harranasaurus khuludae. (kaddumi.2009)
  18. Kem Kem chunkosaur ID

    These three bits came in the post today. They're a bit of a puzzle, and came without any definite ID. I wonder if anyone might have an idea what they are? I think at least two ought to be identifiable, but I've had no luck so far in trying to compare them to illustrations or photos of any dinosaur bones. Bone 1 No idea what this is, but hopefully the distinctive shape will make some sort of identification possible. It was tentatively described as a piece of pelvis. Here's a very quick and dirty photogrammetry 3D scan of this bone, which might help you to get a better idea of the shape. Bone 2 - This is huge and, as you can see, still needs some prep to reveal all of the surfaces. Finally, this very flat piece of bone, which I don't hold out much hope of an ID for! It's hollow, but that's about all I can tell you. @Troodon and @LordTrilobite - hope you don't mind me tagging you as two of the most knowledgeable people on this material. Any thoughts would be appreciated. Many thanks.
  19. Good morning to everyone at TFF! What exactly is this? According to the seller, this belongs to a Lepidotes pankowskii (South Taouz, Errachidia Province, South Morocco - Formation Ifezouane, Red Sandstone Beds, KemKem Basin - Upper Cretaceous, Cenomanian stage - ~96 Million Years) . It's real? Is there scientific information on this? Any and all information will be extremely useful to assist me. I thank everyone! @Troodon @LordTrilobite @Tidgy's Dad @Haravex @hxmendoza
  20. Ammonites from Morocco

    Hi all, I got those ammonites from @cheney416 in a blind trade. They come from Morocco, but the exact location is unknown. Apparently they are from the Bajocian stage of the Jurassic; 170 mya), but I can't find any Jurassic locations in Morocco containing ammonites... Does anyone know what species these are, and what location they could come from? Thanks, Max
  21. Titanosaur? tooth

    From the album Dinosaurs and Reptiles

  22. The past few weeks at the Tucson Fossil I ran across a few fake Spinosaur claws but also was surprised how many good ones there were on the market. I also understand the issues with online claws so decided to put this topic out to help collectors gain a better understanding of them since they are very expensive. These are my opinions and welcome others since no one person as all the answers. There is no bullet proof approach you can take to insure you have a claw that is not totally fake or composited. There are some things you need to consider. - First try dealing with what I call preferred Moroccan merchants, those are typically found at big shows and a few have online or FB sites, ones that specialize in Moroccan material are the best. They typically know what to look for and can point out issues with claws. Makes life a bit harder to get one but you want a good claw don't you. This does not take you off the hook its still YOUR responsibility to know what you are buying. - Unless you are an expert never buy one from Auction site. If you see one that interest you see seek assistant from an expert, not a collector friend, or post it here on the forum we have lots of opinions here. - 2D photos are not always the best to see what is going on with a claw, I prefer handling one. Composited claws can be good and photos don't show you all the issues. - Good preservation and quality are key for making life easy in deciding if its a good claw or not. There is where it pays to focus on the better claws. Claws that are deformed, partial, compressed, beat up or have matrix on them are very difficult to insure you have a good one and especially hard for experts to positively say its good. It always best to save and wait to buy a higher end one. - As a general rule try avoid claws that have matrix glued on them or have seams with matrix. The matrix is there for only one reason to hid trouble. Matrix is a red flag, just tread carefully when looking at one of these. Ask yourself why risk it and buy a potentially problem claw, there are plenty out there that are clean. PRICE = Preservation (Quality) + Size - Repairs - Real claws are expensive, simple as that. Nice ones in the 6+ inch range can easily fetch over 1K depending on quality, 7+ inches can go over 10K . So if you see big claws under 1K there must be a reason unless its the deal of a century and they exist. Most of the claws I show are in the 1-2K range for 4-6 inches. Here are a few from the Tucson show to give you an understanding what real ones look like. Focus on shape, the articulation end, blood grooves and preservation. These two are clean no matrix, no compression may have been broken and reattached, reasonable preservation. Nice claws for any collection Higher Grade - Fatter, nice surface finish, good preservation, few if any repairs. Couple of more examples. Honest merchant shows, some repair and resto. Excellent high end claw around 7 inches very very expensive Fake Claws These two were laying in the box and the merchant said he just had them fabricated. They look pretty good to a novice both reasonable size and configuration. Probably copied from a good one. Red Flags : Check out the graining its does not follow the curve of the claw but is straight. Uniform Color and looks too clean. Finish is flat with no hit of sheen seen on bone. Super long ones are the most suspect, here are two in a box. Unusually long and thin, usually the dorsal curvature is not smooth to the tip has kinks, the preservation is odd, hard to see bone, lots of surface repairs. These may be composited, faked or combo? Who knows to risky to find out. Off an auction site - terrible fake easier to spot- 6.9 inch claw One of the hardest items to replicate is the blood groove that is on either side of the claw. The groove is the widest at the articulation end and slowly tapers to a point to form a channel at the tip that extends outward beyond the dorsal surface. Here is an example of a perfectly preserved one. Here is the tip of the claw from above and you can see the blood groove is just a channel in the claw. Another Characteristic on these claws is that when looked at from the top or bottom they are shaped like an isosceles triangle. Much bigger at the articulation end than the tip. Preservation may affect this but most should be tapered. Like most theropods, hand claws vary depending on digit so there will be variations depending on that and the number of different Spinosaurids that exist in Kem Kem. This is a big unknown and we believe these type of claws all belong to the Spinosaurid family. But here are a couple more you can check out the blood grooves, articulation and shape
  23. Hollardops mesocristata

    From the album Trilobites

  24. Mrakibina cattoi

    From the album Trilobites

  25. I am definitely an amateur when it comes to collecting and need some advice: I recently purchased my first 'larger' Spinosaurus tooth from a small gem/fossil shop in Seattle. The owner told me that it had no repairs or restorations, and that it of course came from Morocco. I tested the tooth under a UV flashlight and there were no anomalies, but I just wanted some more experienced opinions. The enamel looks good- no apparent cracks or suspicious color variations, root still has some of the matrix on it, but the tip seems a little suspicious to me... maybe I'm just being paranoid, but I have read so much about fake fossils and just want to be sure! Let me know what you guys think- Thanks!
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